Name a new fact your learned about Korean culture from reading the book

Use this forum to discuss the January 2021 Book of the month, "The Vanished" by Pejay Bradley
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SorcPenz
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Re: Name a new fact your learned about Korean culture from reading the book

Post by SorcPenz »

Eutoc wrote: 11 Jan 2021, 19:48 I never knew Korea was oppressed in the hands of Japan in the early 20th century. The history shared in the book was quite captivating.
I knew there was bad blood, which is what made reading this that much more important to me. I could read history books but story makes me understand the emotional effects much better. As much as I'm falling in love with Japanese culture through their art and shows, as I fall in love with Kpop and kdramas, I am trying to understand the cultural context, understanding that I have no idea half the stuff that went down between them not that long ago.
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SorcPenz
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Post by SorcPenz »

Sararob06 wrote: 13 Jan 2021, 11:35 I learned that Korean surnames are traditionally monosyllabic. I’m not terribly familiar with Asian culture and know very little about traditional naming standards from any region. I found the part about their disdain for the multisyllabic Japanese names interesting also.
There's been an undercurrent of disdain that pops up, not often, but just out of the blue and in a way I didn't understand, from Korean and Chinese citizens. So I found reading about the time period of Japanese expansion and war really important to help me step at least slightly closer to understanding. I get the point in pride by putting another down, especially if that person/culture hurt you in the past. Like Irish and Scottish can make fun of each other mercilessly meanwhile what we have in common and how close we are, we could get along so well too. But there is a past there, of direct conflict, that feeds the bitterness a bit.
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Post by jeanmtdb »

I learned a bit of Korean history which I had never really known about - from Japanese rule, the caste system there, and the role Russia played early in the 20th century. I'll enjoy finding out more.
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Post by Swirliegirlie »

I learned so much about Korean culture while reading The Vanished. One part that stood out to me was the different types of wedding ceremony rituals performed, most specifically having to bow all the way to the ground to each of you In-Laws. EEEEEEK
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Post by Dominik_G »

I regrettably know very little about Korean culture, so I learned a lot from this book. Many things stayed with me. One that I find myself thinking about a lot is how completely unacceptable divorce was at that time. I believe Lady Sougyon was born into a family that loved and valued her (as much as their cultural norms allowed, but it's undeniable that both her father and brother cared about her), and even in her situation (or especially), she simply wasn't allowed to divorce her husband who brought her so much shame and grief.
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Post by sssns »

It was interesting to learn about their traditional inheritance law. Back then, it was the law of the land that the first-born male heir inherits everything.
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Post by Goral »

Learning about the so called "gender rules" was a big shock for me...the fact that brides have to do as they are trained during their wedding and that they are known by their husbands is just unbearable.
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Post by nikkiloveskiwi »

Having a male son during that time was very important. While having a daughter was not something they look forward to, sadly. Also, divorce was such a taboo back then as well.
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Post by theprakriti »

I never knew that just like many other countries, Koreans also had the belief wherein sons were considered superior to daughters. The mother feel pressured to give birth to a son. If the statistics are looked today, no one would ever realize that at some point of time, this was the case in Korea.
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Post by FaithMO19 »

I learned about their wedding proceedings. The woman has to bow to all members of the husband's family, and she must keep her head down throughout the ceremony.
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Post by AvidBibliophile »

While it's not surprising that young women were expected to be quiet, obedient, and patient (not short-tempered, rebellious, or outspoken) in those days, I was surprised to read about the tradition that mentioned pouring melted wax over a young bride's eyes on the day of her wedding so that she wouldn't see too deeply into her future union before the time was right. :shock:
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Post by lina_muktar31 »

That divorce was looked down upon, that the Japanese ruled over them and the gender norms.
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Post by kdstrack »

I found the details about arranged marriages to be quite interesting. First, they were married at a young age (13 and 14). Second, they had not seen each other previous to the wedding day. (I also enjoyed the detailed descriptions of the dress she wore and the food that was served! It was all very vivid and informative.)
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