Official Review: Inborn Error by Bruce R. Gilbert

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cristinaro
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Official Review: Inborn Error by Bruce R. Gilbert

Post by cristinaro » 20 Apr 2018, 09:39

[Following is an official OnlineBookClub.org review of "Inborn Error" by Bruce R. Gilbert.]
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4 out of 4 stars
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Inborn Error is a skillfully designed medical thriller building up on the old nature-versus-nurture debate. Bruce R. Gilbert uses his lifelong experience in urology and reproductive medicine to write a novel full of challenging topics, excellent twists and turns and an explosive climax.

In 1995, Dr. Barry Gifford is attacked in the parking lot of the Medical Faculty Practice Building. Before collapsing into unconsciousness, he overhears a man and a woman saying they were after Bob Ludlow’s chart and research files. To understand what has just happened, we have to travel back in time to the moment of Bob’s birth.

In 1955, Robert Ludlow becomes a father of triplets. He is the chairman of a highly profitable company and a respected member of the community. On the night of the delivery, a business meeting prevents him from reaching Bayside Hospital in Stamford, Connecticut. Unfortunately, his wife dies during childbirth because of internal bleeding. He soon learns that two of his babies were born with a genetic anomaly. Such a thing is unconceivable for Mr. Ludlow who simply cannot tolerate imperfection. He decides to give up his two babies to Bayside Children’s Home. To appease his conscience, he appoints Orin Barrow, the sleek director of the orphanage, as the trustee of the children’s generous funds.

Unaware of each other’s existence, the three Ludlow children grow up in different circumstances. The gripping storyline follows them through the ups and downs in their life’s journey. The author does an amazing job in making all three of them credible and complex characters. Bob Ludlow benefits from the advantages of a privileged world. He has many servants to care for him, but no father around. Dexter Brunswick passes through very difficult times at the orphanage where his anomaly brings him the label of “devil’s child”. Perhaps the luckiest is Kevin O’Brien who is adopted by a caring nurse and enjoys the affectionate love of a wonderful family. When they meet again, they will be dragged into a deadly game of revenge and survival.

Bruce R. Gilbert poignantly tackles stringent issues affecting the doctor-patient relationship. His intention is to raise people’s awareness with respect to the danger posed by a paternalistic type of medicine. Bob and Debra Ludlow suffer from an extreme dearth of information about their medical problems and are forced to endure humiliating and painful tests with little or no explanation. The author also sounds the alarm when it comes to genetic experiments. He wants to send the message that no breakthrough in science or dreamlike material profit could justify a lack of respect for human life or any form of illegal testing.

Nowhere in the novel did I find the medical terminology too dry or boring. On the contrary, I have learnt many things I had no idea about before. For example, Robert Ludlow’s obsessive behavior of having everything fit in with his standards of perfection is called atelophobia in psychology. If his disease had been diagnosed and treated in time, he could have accepted his children. Likewise, I have learnt that the “runt syndrome” is a deficiency in love and caring which results in stunting of growth and development. Social psychologists study the “cohort effects” or the environmental factors differently affecting the development of unique personalities in polyzygotic siblings who grow up apart from each other. Such information is naturally introduced here and there in the text for us to grasp the meaning of the characters’ actions. In this way, we could easily understand Dexter’s complete lack of empathy for others and narcissistic personality.

The simple, incisive writing style is doubled by a perfect choice of narrative strategy. There is an interesting blending of first and third person perspectives. At times, the use of flashbacks and third-person narrative provides us with more information than that of the first-person narrator. Whenever Barry Gifford assumes the role of storyteller, the plot gains in suspense and mystery. The novel is a genuine page-turner which keeps us tuned in up to the unpredictable ending. Due to its exciting plot and professional editing, I am giving Bruce R. Gilbert’s Inborn Error a rating of 4 out of 4 stars. I am recommending it to all those interested in reading a medical psychological thriller based on thought-provoking ideas, deeply buried family secrets, scientific discoveries, wickedly planned conspiracies and cold-blooded murder.

******
Inborn Error
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Post by Libs_Books » 21 Apr 2018, 04:08

Gosh - the basic scenario is just awful - I know people did this kind of thing to 'imperfect' children but it's horrendous. Does identifying Ludlum's behaviour as resulting from a phobia make it any more acceptable? Anyway, sounds like a good read, but definitely not for me, though I appreciated the review.

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Post by CommMayo » 21 Apr 2018, 09:41

This sounds like a really believable medical thriller. Sometimes the expert in a field can make a book way too dry, but it sounds like this author did a great job using his expertise to create a great novel.

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Post by CambaReviewer » 21 Apr 2018, 10:36

This is a beautifully written review. This book appears to have all the ingredients of what I would like to read about so I am going to add it to my want to read list. Well done!

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Post by cpru68 » 22 Apr 2018, 00:06

Wow! Your review makes this one sound very inviting! I find it fascinating when a book of fiction also sounds like real life. I like when a novel does a little time jumping into the past leading up to its current time as long as it’s not confusing. It sounds like the author got it right. Thank you for this descriptive review with no spoilers!
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Post by kandscreeley » 22 Apr 2018, 08:34

I love medical thrillers, and this one has such an interesting premise. I'm curious to see what happens to all three of the children. I'll have to look this one up. Thanks.
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Post by cristinaro » 22 Apr 2018, 09:15

Libs_Books wrote: ↑
21 Apr 2018, 04:08
Gosh - the basic scenario is just awful - I know people did this kind of thing to 'imperfect' children but it's horrendous. Does identifying Ludlum's behaviour as resulting from a phobia make it any more acceptable? Anyway, sounds like a good read, but definitely not for me, though I appreciated the review.
His behaviour is definitely not acceptable and the long-term consequences are irreversible. The author did not provide any excuse for such an attitude. He merely described the overlooked progress of the disease in Ludlow's behaviour. For example, he prefers discarding rather than repairing a piece of broken furniture. He refuses to hire maids because they have a lisp or a limp. However, money and wealth make people let everything pass. He is even respectfully called the governor.
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Post by cristinaro » 22 Apr 2018, 09:21

CommMayo wrote: ↑
21 Apr 2018, 09:41
This sounds like a really believable medical thriller. Sometimes the expert in a field can make a book way too dry, but it sounds like this author did a great job using his expertise to create a great novel.
I thought exactly the same. The book is not overloaded with technical descriptions. On the contrary, all the medical things I have learnt, especially on genetics, were very interesting and enlightening.
"The madness of writing is the antidote to true madness." (Hanif Kureishi)

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Post by cristinaro » 22 Apr 2018, 09:29

CambaReviewer wrote: ↑
21 Apr 2018, 10:36
This is a beautifully written review. This book appears to have all the ingredients of what I would like to read about so I am going to add it to my want to read list. Well done!
Thank you very much. I am glad you are considering the idea of reading the book because I can assure you it will give you the opportunity to ponder on many things.
"The madness of writing is the antidote to true madness." (Hanif Kureishi)

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Post by cristinaro » 22 Apr 2018, 09:35

cpru68 wrote: ↑
22 Apr 2018, 00:06
Wow! Your review makes this one sound very inviting! I find it fascinating when a book of fiction also sounds like real life. I like when a novel does a little time jumping into the past leading up to its current time as long as it’s not confusing. It sounds like the author got it right. Thank you for this descriptive review with no spoilers!
The flashbacks are not confusing at all in this case. On the contrary, they explain many things in the characters' evolution. :) I am doing my best not to reveal much although I am pretty tempted sometimes.
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Post by cristinaro » 22 Apr 2018, 09:44

kandscreeley wrote: ↑
22 Apr 2018, 08:34
I love medical thrillers, and this one has such an interesting premise. I'm curious to see what happens to all three of the children. I'll have to look this one up. Thanks.
The author relies on both genetics and psychology, so the development of all characters is veridical even if not predictable.
"The madness of writing is the antidote to true madness." (Hanif Kureishi)

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Post by fna110901 » 22 Apr 2018, 10:05

The medical psychological thriller - Inborn Error by Bruce R. Gilbert, is definetly one that I will add to my list of books to read. This is a genre that I am particulary interested , albeit fiction or non. The review deserves a Bravo and job well done.

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Post by cristinaro » 22 Apr 2018, 11:58

fna110901 wrote: ↑
22 Apr 2018, 10:05
The medical psychological thriller - Inborn Error by Bruce R. Gilbert, is definetly one that I will add to my list of books to read. This is a genre that I am particulary interested , albeit fiction or non. The review deserves a Bravo and job well done.
Just look at the cover and think of the title for one second. Both of them are definitely alluring and promise an enticing story. After reading the book, I have once again asked myself what makes us who we are and how much we are aware of our social and cultural conditioning. Thank you for reading and for your kind words!
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Post by Clinical1 » 22 Apr 2018, 12:07

I have taken post-graduate courses in embryology. This book, although fiction, hopefully there is a very realistic undertone to this work. It will make for a great read.

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Post by cristinaro » 22 Apr 2018, 12:12

Clinical1 wrote: ↑
22 Apr 2018, 12:07
I have taken post-graduate courses in embryology. This book, although fiction, hopefully there is a very realistic undertone to this work. It will make for a great read.
Wow! I think it would be great to have a specialist's view on the matter. For me, everything sounded very realistic, but an expert in the field may be more demanding. Thanks for reading!
"The madness of writing is the antidote to true madness." (Hanif Kureishi)

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