Featured Official Review: The Buried Secrets of Peonies

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lilserenity56
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Re: Official Review: The Buried Secrets of Peonies

Post by lilserenity56 » 20 Apr 2018, 13:57

This is great reading and a great learning experience. As of today things have changed to a degree but there is still war and power used to the peoples' decisions.
The book is a great reading material for our children I believe they need to know and learn from it ..Thank you writer for this book :techie-studyingbrown:

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Post by Raya raymond » 21 Apr 2018, 06:38

I love this review. I think this book is very emotive. I don't like reading stories that break my heart but something about how well written this review is, makes me wanna read it.

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Post by heliz_t » 21 Apr 2018, 11:17

This sounds fascinating! This kind of book is very important in order to understand the world and humanity. It wouldn't be an easy read though.

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Post by precious1999 » 22 Apr 2018, 12:14

The first chapter quite fascinating i love the scary part For example, in the first story prisoners plant peonies in the garden plot outside their cells as a way to cling to hop

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Post by NL Hartje » 22 Apr 2018, 20:55

precious1999 wrote:
22 Apr 2018, 12:14
The first chapter quite fascinating i love the scary part For example, in the first story prisoners plant peonies in the garden plot outside their cells as a way to cling to hop
Yes! Have you gotten to any of the other chapters yet!? Was the first your favorite!?
“So the writer who breeds more words than he needs, is making a chore for the reader who reads.”
-Dr. Seuss

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NL Hartje
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Post by NL Hartje » 22 Apr 2018, 20:56

heliz_t wrote:
21 Apr 2018, 11:17
This sounds fascinating! This kind of book is very important in order to understand the world and humanity. It wouldn't be an easy read though.
It was certainly appropriate for one quiet afternoon of soul searching and emotion :techie-studyinggray:
“So the writer who breeds more words than he needs, is making a chore for the reader who reads.”
-Dr. Seuss

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NL Hartje
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Post by NL Hartje » 22 Apr 2018, 20:59

Raya raymond wrote:
21 Apr 2018, 06:38
I love this review. I think this book is very emotive. I don't like reading stories that break my heart but something about how well written this review is, makes me wanna read it.
Thank you for the compliment to my review! It really is worth reading and it's good because its very short so the emotional turmoil can be harnessed into the scope of a few hours.
“So the writer who breeds more words than he needs, is making a chore for the reader who reads.”
-Dr. Seuss

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NL Hartje
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Post by NL Hartje » 22 Apr 2018, 21:00

lilserenity56 wrote:
20 Apr 2018, 13:57
This is great reading and a great learning experience. As of today things have changed to a degree but there is still war and power used to the peoples' decisions.
The book is a great reading material for our children I believe they need to know and learn from it ..Thank you writer for this book :techie-studyingbrown:
I like that you've notated that our children could benefit from this book. For whatever reason, this never crossed my mind, but it is such an astute obervation. This is precicelly the type of even our children should learn about.
“So the writer who breeds more words than he needs, is making a chore for the reader who reads.”
-Dr. Seuss

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NL Hartje
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Post by NL Hartje » 22 Apr 2018, 21:04

Honourable419 wrote:
20 Apr 2018, 13:43
I didn't feel a huge emotional pull in the first two stories but tas it continued and I started understanding the idea, I realized there was more emotion in the beginning than I originally attributed. This is overwhelming, the writer builds up emotion and suspense simultaneously in the readers mind spurring up a sort flashbacks and imagination.
I reacted in much the same way! I wasn't blown away until the book began to progress and it was then that I began to reflect on the power in the first chapter. Please comment on a forum I've begun about the different chapters. I would to hear your opinion. I think it's called something like "favorite story of the eight."
“So the writer who breeds more words than he needs, is making a chore for the reader who reads.”
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NL Hartje
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Post by NL Hartje » 22 Apr 2018, 21:07

Kibetious wrote:
18 Apr 2018, 16:05
Nice to see that you were able to give credit to the book and the writer with the 4 out of 4 stars rating. Indeed, the book is good and we all can draw a lesson or two. There is optimism written all over the sad stories that freedom will ring in this nation one day.
I would love to hear more about your thoughts. Which was your favorite chapter? I started a forum called "favorite story of the eight" where we can discuss the different metaphors.
“So the writer who breeds more words than he needs, is making a chore for the reader who reads.”
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Post by NL Hartje » 22 Apr 2018, 21:08

PlanetHauth wrote:
20 Apr 2018, 00:05
I have to say, I know absolutely nothing about the circumstances surrounding the events of this book, nor do I know anything about the events of this book. I fear too many around the world try to cover up events that should be public knowledge. It's a scary thought realizing just how much influence or power someone can have if they're capable of almost completely covering up the slaughter of nearly 30,000 people.

This seems like a fascinating and, in my case, an important read.
Thank you so much for reading my review, and for your comment. I hope you get a chance to read the book.
“So the writer who breeds more words than he needs, is making a chore for the reader who reads.”
-Dr. Seuss

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Post by YinDragon_76 » 23 Apr 2018, 02:06

Definitely something I would be interested in reading as I've become very interested in books written by Middle Eastern authors who can open our eyes to the horrors experienced due to growing up in war-torn cities and living under violent tyrannical regimes. I read another book last year in which the narrative centers around the same massacre, which is the only reason I knew of what you were referring to. If you would be interested in reading it, i could try and remember the name and author, I'm pretty sure it's one I own and not something I borrowed from the library. Thank you for your review, I will add this to my Want To Read shelf for sure!

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Post by Miss_BeckyG » 23 Apr 2018, 04:49

So many countries grapple with political prisoners being massacred by the government of the day. Many of these gruesome incidences are covered up and never acknowledged. "The Buried Secrets of Peonies" seeks to illuminate the occurrence of the massacre and in doing so gives voice to those who were affected in Iran. This is a must read book and it has received a worthy review.
If we encounter a man of rare intellect, we should ask him what books he reads.
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Post by Crazybud » 23 Apr 2018, 07:38

Woah! I love well researched accounts of real world happenings. I was ignorant of the Iranian massacre till now. Looks like the author did a good work with the book. Thank you for your in-depth review!
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Post by Prof_Reginald_Eke » 23 Apr 2018, 08:42

the massacre was inhuman, a tragedy indeed.

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