Review by LyorBoone -- The Reel Sisters

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LyorBoone
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Review by LyorBoone -- The Reel Sisters

Post by LyorBoone »

[Following is a volunteer review of "The Reel Sisters" by Michelle Cummings.]
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4 out of 4 stars
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The Reel Sisters is a tale of friendship. Fly fishing ultimately brings all of the characters together. First there are four of them, recruited by Sophie. They are the veterans of the group. Also, between Amanda and Rose, there is quite a bit of variety in age. Then Melody comes along as a newcomer. This allows Michelle Cummings to show the full cycle of a spectacular friendship. It begins, and then it keeps going. Each member of the group gives and takes, and their lives are better off for it. This all builds up for a beautiful conclusion that resonates with the soul.

This book is not for a child audience. This is a story about adults and sometimes they feel the need to use language as strong as the f-bomb. There is even one character that, at times, uses such language in casual conversation like a rebellious high school student. However, I feel that this story is one most people can appreciate with it’s unique cast of characters. It is by no means a mystery, but the story unfolds to the same affect of life. You have a general idea of where things are going, but there are a bunch of surprises on the way.

I really enjoyed the character’s interactions with one another. It’s neat to see a bunch of goofy friends in an environment where they are right at home. The prose flowed well, and I enjoyed the descriptions of nature. I also thought that the fly fishing analogies were used perfectly. They gave this story a deeper meaning for me, and its tale will likely live on in my memory till the day I die.

I was disappointed in moments where some of the characters seemed to be the same person, almost. The biggest differentiation in characters was their personal situations. It gave these characters a place to return to in their mind when they backed away from the present. Amanda constantly worried about her husband Mike in the military. Sophie often worried about her life, absent a husband. These worries didn’t always tread new ground. Then there were other moments where characters would admire character qualities in dialogue that didn’t stand out as much in the unfolding of the story. It struck me as showing instead of telling. In one instance, Sophie mentions meeting Rose who dropped two f-bombs in minutes of their first encounter. This made Rose a special person to her, but, in the rest of the story, this encounter seems less fitting of Rose's character. We see Rose switching words in a fun, corny fashion to avoid cursing with the names of religious figures, but she never seems to feel the need for more vulgar words. More distinguished characters traits that the reader can see would have helped the first person view, that got passed around between the quintet of characters, be a bigger masterpiece.

I didn’t find a lot of errors in this story. In fact, I encountered a few new words. I had to look up au naturale, initially thinking it a mistyped version of all natural. Then a web search confirmed I had a new word to add to my vocabulary. Much of this story's magic was in the little pieces. Each character's thread of story came together like a masterful quilt. This effect is why I award this story 4 out of 4 stars. The story grew slower at times, but I never found myself losing interest!

******
The Reel Sisters
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“History doesn’t repeat itself, but it does rhyme” - Mark Twain. Dare we say the same thing about every story that gets told in the world?

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djr6090
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Post by djr6090 »

Speaking to the high-school-like cursing, I saw the change in Melody's vocabulary to be typical of a young person socializing with mature friends for the first time. I loved this book.

LyorBoone
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Post by LyorBoone »

djr6090 wrote: ↑
07 Sep 2019, 08:38
Speaking to the high-school-like cursing, I saw the change in Melody's vocabulary to be typical of a young person socializing with mature friends for the first time. I loved this book.
I went to public school. So I think of high schoolers as the age group most likely to curse like sailors, if not more. It seems to be their way of saying they are grown no matter how their parents feel about it. Then in college, I've noticed people, that keep profanity in their regular vocabulary, start to save such words for occasions where such words belong more, to some degree. With Melody's inner thoughts, I tend to see her as the high school range, recently graduated to be living on her own, especially with her avoiding of discussions about her parents. Her situation makes me think of her as a 19 year old that decided she could do photography instead of going to college. I've also known enough high school students that couldn't graduate on time that I think the early 20s can fairly be described as high school, especially if the individual is still in the same mindset of high school regardless of whether or not they graduated. Did Melody mention taking college like classes somewhere early on? I don't recall because we mostly see her as the reluctant musician seeking out a profesion in photography. What age did you think she was as a young person?
“History doesn’t repeat itself, but it does rhyme” - Mark Twain. Dare we say the same thing about every story that gets told in the world?

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djr6090
Posts: 621
Joined: 29 Jun 2019, 10:15
2019 Reading Goal: 40
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 125
Favorite Book: From Liberty to Magnolia: In Search of the American Dream
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Bookshelf Size: 102
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-djr6090.html
Latest Review: Through the Eyes of a Black Butterfly by Karen L. Williams-Tisdel

Post by djr6090 »

LyorBoone wrote: ↑
11 Sep 2019, 14:04
djr6090 wrote: ↑
07 Sep 2019, 08:38
Speaking to the high-school-like cursing, I saw the change in Melody's vocabulary to be typical of a young person socializing with mature friends for the first time. I loved this book.
What age did you think she was as a young person?
I pictured her as at early 20's. Definitely a free spirit, and an artist who was unafraid to go against the norm. That she came from a privileged background was evident. Yet her independence kept her from dwelling on the parental norms that she was rejecting. The way she meets the 'sisters' was a hoot.

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