The Value of Education

Use this forum to discuss the July 2019 Book of the month, "Defining Moments of a Free Man from a Black Stream" by Dr Frank L Douglas.
Post Reply
User avatar
Kibetious
Previous Member of the Month
Posts: 2158
Joined: 26 Jul 2017, 01:48
2019 Reading Goal: 70
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 30
2018 Reading Goal: 100
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 49
Currently Reading: The Onam Rhyme and Other Passages from Time, (American Edition)
Bookshelf Size: 777
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-kibetious.html
Latest Review: Is God Worth a Dime by Sandra Kay Cooper

Re: The Value of Education

Post by Kibetious » 08 Jul 2019, 08:07

KristyKhem wrote:
02 Jul 2019, 21:07
The author seems to value education very much!

He wrote about how empowered he felt when he learned his father was a lawyer. He once mentioned that Auntie Gertrude showed him off to her customers because he was a 'bright boy'. He also stated that he achieved A's in every subject, he was offered free lessons because he was a promising student, and he topped the country in his exams. He even won a scholarship. In one instance, he voiced his discontent at not being recognized for placing in the top three at the Special Assembly.

Do you think there was a big focus on education? And do you think did the author wanted to set himself apart from others in his life by focusing so much on his academic achievements?
It is true that the author has focused on academics very much but I believe he enjoyed studying which is not everybody's cup of tea. For whether he wanted to set himself apart or not, I cannot tell but perhaps he saw himself being better if he performed well academically.
​​​​​​He gives strength to those who are tired; to the ones who lack power, he gives renewed energy :techie-studyinggray:

User avatar
Kibetious
Previous Member of the Month
Posts: 2158
Joined: 26 Jul 2017, 01:48
2019 Reading Goal: 70
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 30
2018 Reading Goal: 100
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 49
Currently Reading: The Onam Rhyme and Other Passages from Time, (American Edition)
Bookshelf Size: 777
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-kibetious.html
Latest Review: Is God Worth a Dime by Sandra Kay Cooper

Post by Kibetious » 08 Jul 2019, 08:12

Stephanie Elizabeth wrote:
03 Jul 2019, 09:35
KristyKhem wrote:
02 Jul 2019, 21:07
The author seems to value education very much!

He wrote about how empowered he felt when he learned his father was a lawyer. He once mentioned that Auntie Gertrude showed him off to her customers because he was a 'bright boy'. He also stated that he achieved A's in every subject, he was offered free lessons because he was a promising student, and he topped the country in his exams. He even won a scholarship. In one instance, he voiced his discontent at not being recognized for placing in the top three at the Special Assembly.

Do you think there was a big focus on education? And do you think did the author wanted to set himself apart from others in his life by focusing so much on his academic achievements?
The book was definitely focused on education and I think the author really wanted readers to see the importance of being educated. He worked hard to achieve success and maybe he wanted to toot his own horn a little bit, but I think it is warranted as he had many obstacles to overcome.
It is true that the author values education and his life points to the fact that he has been working hard himself. His profile reveals that he's been an excellent performer starting from being the best in his home country and winning a scholarship to study in the US.
​​​​​​He gives strength to those who are tired; to the ones who lack power, he gives renewed energy :techie-studyinggray:

User avatar
Wriley
Posts: 214
Joined: 06 Jan 2019, 18:09
2019 Reading Goal: 100
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 15
Favorite Book: Executive Hoodlum
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 78
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-wriley.html
Latest Review: Debt Cleanse by Jorge P. Newbery

Post by Wriley » 08 Jul 2019, 09:11

The author's achievements in education seems to be his natural ability not exactly from hard work. Science majors especially may have an above average ability to memorize. Frank may have wanted to be seen for who he was and not his acedemic achievements. With natural ability, acedemic are easy compared to some people who must work very hard for their education. So much emphasis was placed on education that Frank may have been seen as only that not who he really was. Frank had passion to help which set him apart from other doctors.
Logic will get you from A to Z
But Imagination will get you
EVERYWHERE

Albert Einstein

User avatar
Nisha Ward
Member of the Month
Posts: 1320
Joined: 04 Feb 2019, 15:00
2019 Reading Goal: 40
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 70
Favorite Author: Garth Nix
Favorite Book: A Murder is Announced
Currently Reading: Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone
Bookshelf Size: 195
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-nisha-ward.html
Latest Review: Daughter of Athena by A. Rose
Reading Device: B0794RHPZD
fav_author_id: 4351

Post by Nisha Ward » 08 Jul 2019, 11:04

The value of education is definitely inherent to this book. It was what brought him out of poverty at a time when Guyana was in tumult and it was what allowed him to see what the truth was in matters that could have gone in a very different direction. I don't think he was using it to set himself apart, however, but show how it allowed him to connect to others, like with the German lessons allowing him to create a social circle that offered their support when the time came for it. I also think the focus on awards and medals was to show others what you can be capable of if you work hard and with the kind of integrity he seemed to espouse.
"...while a book has got to be worthwhile from the point of view of the reader it's got to be worthwhile from the point of view of the writer as well." - Terry Pratchett on The Last Continent and his writing.

User avatar
briellejee
Posts: 1420
Joined: 25 Aug 2017, 23:40
2019 Reading Goal: 100
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 13
2018 Reading Goal: 120
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 80
2017 Reading Goal: 15
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 263
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-briellejee.html
Latest Review: Gringo by Dan "Tito" Davis

Post by briellejee » 08 Jul 2019, 21:59

WaryReader wrote:
05 Jul 2019, 12:16
Definitely! Education is a powerful tool. Sooner or later, if you're an intelligent person, people will have to respect you at least a little bit, despite their own prejudices. :techie-studyingbrown:
I agree. It seems like being knowledgable and wise gives you a ticket to being respected by others no matter what your past is or whatever you define yourself. I think society has high regards for educational attainment, which has its pros and cons too.
"All that is gold does not glitter, not all those who wander are lost"

User avatar
briellejee
Posts: 1420
Joined: 25 Aug 2017, 23:40
2019 Reading Goal: 100
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 13
2018 Reading Goal: 120
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 80
2017 Reading Goal: 15
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 263
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-briellejee.html
Latest Review: Gringo by Dan "Tito" Davis

Post by briellejee » 08 Jul 2019, 22:08

Kelyn wrote:
05 Jul 2019, 14:47
I think there was a definite focus on education. The author seemed to want to show readers that dedication toward education (or anything else) can open many doors to opportunity and success.
This is true. Even in jobs and opportunities like further education, people tend to value you more as an asset when your educational background is vast. Though I slightly disagree that it alone could mostly lead to success, it sure is a privilege and a stepping stone to success. :tiphat: :techie-studyingbrown:
"All that is gold does not glitter, not all those who wander are lost"

User avatar
Tiffanyli
Posts: 35
Joined: 29 Apr 2019, 19:21
2019 Reading Goal: 30
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 53
Currently Reading: Quiet
Bookshelf Size: 18
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-tiffanyli.html
Latest Review: Burn Zones by Jorge P. Newbery

Post by Tiffanyli » 08 Jul 2019, 23:25

There definitely is a big focus on education. But I don't see anything wrong them placing such a great importance on it.

cornelia_SD
Posts: 76
Joined: 24 Sep 2018, 11:27
2019 Reading Goal: 20
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 45
Currently Reading: From Liberty to Magnolia: In Search of the American Dream
Bookshelf Size: 23
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-cornelia-sd.html
Latest Review: The Fox by M. N. J. Butler

Post by cornelia_SD » 09 Jul 2019, 05:23

I can relate with the author's value on education. It's sort of hope in a person, raising your chances to have a better job which can result to a better income and life. Though sometimes, there's also politics in the educational system.
Life is a journey. Do not take for granted the people you are with for tomorrow they may turn to a different road. :techie-studyingbrown:

User avatar
Nisha Ward
Member of the Month
Posts: 1320
Joined: 04 Feb 2019, 15:00
2019 Reading Goal: 40
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 70
Favorite Author: Garth Nix
Favorite Book: A Murder is Announced
Currently Reading: Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone
Bookshelf Size: 195
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-nisha-ward.html
Latest Review: Daughter of Athena by A. Rose
Reading Device: B0794RHPZD
fav_author_id: 4351

Post by Nisha Ward » 09 Jul 2019, 06:01

cornelia_SD wrote:
09 Jul 2019, 05:23
I can relate with the author's value on education. It's sort of hope in a person, raising your chances to have a better job which can result to a better income and life. Though sometimes, there's also politics in the educational system.
Yeah. I think the author showed the political side very well with the Lehigh portion of his life. That he managed to push through it and learn from that experience just goes to show that education isn't just about learning what's in books.
"...while a book has got to be worthwhile from the point of view of the reader it's got to be worthwhile from the point of view of the writer as well." - Terry Pratchett on The Last Continent and his writing.

User avatar
Nisha Ward
Member of the Month
Posts: 1320
Joined: 04 Feb 2019, 15:00
2019 Reading Goal: 40
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 70
Favorite Author: Garth Nix
Favorite Book: A Murder is Announced
Currently Reading: Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone
Bookshelf Size: 195
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-nisha-ward.html
Latest Review: Daughter of Athena by A. Rose
Reading Device: B0794RHPZD
fav_author_id: 4351

Post by Nisha Ward » 09 Jul 2019, 06:03

briellejee wrote:
08 Jul 2019, 21:59
WaryReader wrote:
05 Jul 2019, 12:16
Definitely! Education is a powerful tool. Sooner or later, if you're an intelligent person, people will have to respect you at least a little bit, despite their own prejudices. :techie-studyingbrown:
I agree. It seems like being knowledgable and wise gives you a ticket to being respected by others no matter what your past is or whatever you define yourself. I think society has high regards for educational attainment, which has its pros and cons too.
It does, but I don't think that's the only reason for why he was respected. One can have wisdom and knowledge without compassion, which is something I think he was trying to enforce. With every mention of his education, he talked about what he would use it for, rather than just highlighting his accolades.
"...while a book has got to be worthwhile from the point of view of the reader it's got to be worthwhile from the point of view of the writer as well." - Terry Pratchett on The Last Continent and his writing.

User avatar
Nisha Ward
Member of the Month
Posts: 1320
Joined: 04 Feb 2019, 15:00
2019 Reading Goal: 40
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 70
Favorite Author: Garth Nix
Favorite Book: A Murder is Announced
Currently Reading: Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone
Bookshelf Size: 195
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-nisha-ward.html
Latest Review: Daughter of Athena by A. Rose
Reading Device: B0794RHPZD
fav_author_id: 4351

Post by Nisha Ward » 09 Jul 2019, 06:08

briellejee wrote:
08 Jul 2019, 22:08
Kelyn wrote:
05 Jul 2019, 14:47
I think there was a definite focus on education. The author seemed to want to show readers that dedication toward education (or anything else) can open many doors to opportunity and success.
This is true. Even in jobs and opportunities like further education, people tend to value you more as an asset when your educational background is vast. Though I slightly disagree that it alone could mostly lead to success, it sure is a privilege and a stepping stone to success. :tiphat: :techie-studyingbrown:
It is, but also his recognition of the system and how it was built on racism was also a form of education, I think. There are many ways to be taught and Dr. Douglas showed a lot of them.
"...while a book has got to be worthwhile from the point of view of the reader it's got to be worthwhile from the point of view of the writer as well." - Terry Pratchett on The Last Continent and his writing.

User avatar
Heatholt
Posts: 71
Joined: 07 Jun 2019, 11:32
2019 Reading Goal: 50
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 6
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 24
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-heatholt.html
Latest Review: The Undying Queen of Ur by Abraham Kawa & Arahom Radjah

Post by Heatholt » 09 Jul 2019, 11:38

The book was definitely focused on education. It was his means to enhance his existence. I think this message is really inspiring for the youth.
"We're all born naked and the rest is drag." - RuPaul Charles
:wink:

User avatar
Florence Nalianya
Posts: 297
Joined: 24 Jun 2019, 10:33
2019 Reading Goal: 15
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 60
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 45
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-florence-nalianya.html
Latest Review: Dolphins Don’t Run Marathons by Sam Brand

Post by Florence Nalianya » 10 Jul 2019, 06:43

Education is portrayed as very valuable for it made the author get to places that challenged the racists.

MysticalAngel
Posts: 10
Joined: 05 Jun 2019, 14:38
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 17
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-mysticalangel.html
Latest Review: Conflict on the Yangtze by Greg Kater

Post by MysticalAngel » 10 Jul 2019, 18:15

The author had a lot of issues with getting a good education in Guana. Memoirs to me are always good to read because you get a sense of what is going on in different time periods as well as what struggles people had to go through. The struggles the author and his family had to go through because of their color in order for him to get an education is unreal. The fact that he persevered through all of it and made something of himself is wonderful. It is a book that I would love to read later on. I have read many books like this one and enjoy reading them it gives you a sense of what people had to go through. The living conditions and the struggles just to make ends meet and how people of color were passed over for white people was wrong. I am glad that the school system has changed that people are more equal now..

User avatar
Nisha Ward
Member of the Month
Posts: 1320
Joined: 04 Feb 2019, 15:00
2019 Reading Goal: 40
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 70
Favorite Author: Garth Nix
Favorite Book: A Murder is Announced
Currently Reading: Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone
Bookshelf Size: 195
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-nisha-ward.html
Latest Review: Daughter of Athena by A. Rose
Reading Device: B0794RHPZD
fav_author_id: 4351

Post by Nisha Ward » 10 Jul 2019, 20:35

MysticalAngel wrote:
10 Jul 2019, 18:15
The author had a lot of issues with getting a good education in Guana. Memoirs to me are always good to read because you get a sense of what is going on in different time periods as well as what struggles people had to go through. The struggles the author and his family had to go through because of their color in order for him to get an education is unreal. The fact that he persevered through all of it and made something of himself is wonderful. It is a book that I would love to read later on. I have read many books like this one and enjoy reading them it gives you a sense of what people had to go through. The living conditions and the struggles just to make ends meet and how people of color were passed over for white people was wrong. I am glad that the school system has changed that people are more equal now..
I'd argue that there are still barriers in place, as evidenced by the problems experienced at MIT when he returned to working State side.
"...while a book has got to be worthwhile from the point of view of the reader it's got to be worthwhile from the point of view of the writer as well." - Terry Pratchett on The Last Continent and his writing.

Post Reply

Return to “Discuss "Defining Moments of a Free Man from a Black Stream" by Dr Frank L Douglas.”