What is your take about the author?

Use this forum to discuss the May 2019 Book of the month, "Misreading Judas" by Robert Wahler
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Uinto
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Re: What is your take about the author?

Post by Uinto » 15 May 2019, 07:14

The author's work is commendable from the perspective of the research he's done towards his book. Additionally, the book extends the boundaries of religious debate.

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Post by Sahansdal » 15 May 2019, 08:54

Nyambura Githui wrote:
15 May 2019, 03:40
I don't think the author is a Christian at all , more like he's against it. If he is a Christian, it's a betrayal to the Christian faith and the believers.
It isn't a question of being for or against anything. There is new information available! I tried to show how scholars missed it and why it is so critically important. Judas is a stand-in for James. He was a Master, a savior, one of many. It has always been this way. Christianity is an abberation.

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Post by Sahansdal » 15 May 2019, 08:57

juliusotieno02 wrote:
02 May 2019, 05:11
Kibetious wrote:
02 May 2019, 04:44
Ferdinand_otieno wrote:
02 May 2019, 03:26


I think betrayal would have been the reaction, and I think the author is way open to new ways of thinking.
It sounds like betrayal but I am sure that with the rise in relativism, most many not really care about his beliefs as long as they know the truth.
I get your point but i think many people will determine the authenticity of his claims by first determining who he is as far as religion is concerned.
I'm a Satsangi with the Radha Soami Satsang Beas.

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Post by magnoparisi » 15 May 2019, 14:31

briellejee wrote:
12 May 2019, 06:53
If the author is a Christian, I could say that he will be marked as an outcast. Growing up in the church, elders will surely label him as someone evil since his faith about the Scripture has been corrupted. I think of him as someone ultimately curious. But telling people to believe his research about Judas is something I didn't like.
Look at the new pope. Soon he will make an statement quoting "Misreading Judas". :lol2: :lol2:

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Post by Tiffanyli » 15 May 2019, 18:12

It's everyones right to believe in whatever they choose to believe. But if he's Christian, it would definitely be a big surprise to me. His take on is almost a 180 on Christianity. He has a right to believe whatever he wants and it's hard to say how somoene who was highly religious would react to his opinion. But I don't think that they would be able to have a happy conversation about their opposing beliefs.

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Post by Essie_Reviews » 15 May 2019, 21:43

Stephanie Elizabeth wrote:
02 May 2019, 04:29
Ferdinand_otieno wrote:
02 May 2019, 03:26
juliusotieno02 wrote:
02 May 2019, 02:55
Having read that book, what do you think of the author? Is he religious? Is he a christian? What do you think the reaction of the church would have been if he is/was a christian?
I think betrayal would have been the reaction, and I think the author is way open to new ways of thinking.
I agree, the church would not accept his revelation. I feel as though the author is not overly religious otherwise he would not dig so deep to find all of these secrets.
I don't think that true, personally. If being religious means you aren't open to understanding the doctrine you're dedicating your life to, I think that's to call religious people one-dimensional and a lot of religious people think that's very ignorant. I hope he's religious because that bodes well for the religious community; showing that it's okay to be curious and to understand that you have every right to figure out what it is you're claiming to believe. To avert your eyes from the possibility that something is being taught wrong or that something that's stated couldn't possibly happen, inadvertently exposes the fact that one is aware that those things might exist. Isn't that in and of itself, doubt? A true believer would want to know what it is they're believing and then to accept what they find on their own terms. The author did just that.
Imagineering.

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Post by Sahansdal » 15 May 2019, 23:01

Essie_Reviews wrote:
15 May 2019, 21:43
Stephanie Elizabeth wrote:
02 May 2019, 04:29
Ferdinand_otieno wrote:
02 May 2019, 03:26


I think betrayal would have been the reaction, and I think the author is way open to new ways of thinking.
I agree, the church would not accept his revelation. I feel as though the author is not overly religious otherwise he would not dig so deep to find all of these secrets.
I don't think that true, personally. If being religious means you aren't open to understanding the doctrine you're dedicating your life to, I think that's to call religious people one-dimensional and a lot of religious people think that's very ignorant. I hope he's religious because that bodes well for the religious community; showing that it's okay to be curious and to understand that you have every right to figure out what it is you're claiming to believe. To avert your eyes from the possibility that something is being taught wrong or that something that's stated couldn't possibly happen, inadvertently exposes the fact that one is aware that those things might exist. Isn't that in and of itself, doubt? A true believer would want to know what it is they're believing and then to accept what they find on their own terms. The author did just that.
Thanks.
Essie_Reviews wrote:
15 May 2019, 21:43
Stephanie Elizabeth wrote:
02 May 2019, 04:29
Ferdinand_otieno wrote:
02 May 2019, 03:26
I think betrayal would have been the reaction, and I think the author is way open to new ways of thinking.
I agree, the church would not accept his revelation. I feel as though the author is not overly religious otherwise he would not dig so deep to find all of these secrets.
I don't think that true, personally. If being religious means you aren't open to understanding the doctrine you're dedicating your life to, I think that's to call religious people one-dimensional and a lot of religious people think that's very ignorant. I hope he's religious because that bodes well for the religious community; showing that it's okay to be curious and to understand that you have every right to figure out what it is you're claiming to believe. To avert your eyes from the possibility that something is being taught wrong or that something that's stated couldn't possibly happen, inadvertently exposes the fact that one is aware that those things might exist. Isn't that in and of itself, doubt? A true believer would want to know what it is they're believing and then to accept what they find on their own terms. The author did just that.
Thanks, Essie. I think so, too. I am very serious about my spirituality. I am an RSSB Satsangi, rssb.org.
I present brand new period evidence that was never known before. It blew my mind. I hope it finds its mark in someone with an ability I don't have to make it of some consequence.

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Post by Shade-Tree-Reader » 16 May 2019, 15:04

On is own Facebook page the author identifies himself as a "lifelong Christian." He is writing spiritual material so he should understand that his world view is entirely incompatible with Christianity, but he appears not to. I think he is trying very hard to make a name for himself in the gnostic world and is in way over his head.

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Post by Sahansdal » 17 May 2019, 00:06

Shade-Tree-Reader wrote:
16 May 2019, 15:04
On is own Facebook page the author identifies himself as a "lifelong Christian." He is writing spiritual material so he should understand that his world view is entirely incompatible with Christianity, but he appears not to. I think he is trying very hard to make a name for himself in the gnostic world and is in way over his head.
To the contrary, Shady, it is the so-called scholars of Gnosticism who are over-extended. I PRACTICE it, daily. I know very well what I am talking about, because I have a mystic Master who taught me well. rssb dot org.

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Post by Kibetious » 17 May 2019, 03:14

There is always curiosity in us to solve what we find most disturbing and the author could have stumbled on the Gospel of Judas and thought of writing this book. No one can be crucified for expressing their beliefs.
​​​​​​He gives strength to those who are tired; to the ones who lack power, he gives renewed energy :techie-studyinggray:

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Post by Kibetious » 17 May 2019, 03:19

Shade-Tree-Reader wrote:
16 May 2019, 15:04
On is own Facebook page the author identifies himself as a "lifelong Christian." He is writing spiritual material so he should understand that his world view is entirely incompatible with Christianity, but he appears not to. I think he is trying very hard to make a name for himself in the gnostic world and is in way over his head.
I think Gnosticism and the true Gospel are incompatible. Trying to explain somethings is almost similar to trying to swim in a big ocean. Some questions cannot be answered now.
​​​​​​He gives strength to those who are tired; to the ones who lack power, he gives renewed energy :techie-studyinggray:

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Post by Fazzier » 17 May 2019, 08:20

Renu G wrote:
02 May 2019, 05:34
The author had responded to my comment on LinkedIn by stating that the findings spell the end of Christianity. What nonsense!
Oh! Even though people have freedom of expression, that seems like blatant attack to Christianity.

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Post by Fazzier » 17 May 2019, 08:23

Kibetious wrote:
17 May 2019, 03:14
There is always curiosity in us to solve what we find most disturbing and the author could have stumbled on the Gospel of Judas and thought of writing this book. No one can be crucified for expressing their beliefs.
That's right. I agree with you.

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Post by Julius_ » 17 May 2019, 08:46

To be honest, i think the author is very open minded; he presented uncompromised view of this judas and jesus' story. Or what i would call 'unsweetened' story.

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Post by Ferdinand_otieno » 17 May 2019, 09:29

Shade-Tree-Reader wrote:
16 May 2019, 15:04
On is own Facebook page the author identifies himself as a "lifelong Christian." He is writing spiritual material so he should understand that his world view is entirely incompatible with Christianity, but he appears not to. I think he is trying very hard to make a name for himself in the gnostic world and is in way over his head.
Trying very hard ro make a name for himself while immune to the "turmoil" (20%) of readers of his book, unbelievable!! :techie-studyinggray:

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