Ask the Author

Use this forum to discuss the April 2019 Book of the month, "Adrift" by Charlie Sheldon
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Re: Ask the Author

Post by Charlie Sheldon » 12 Apr 2019, 08:23

There is always some mystery when something on a ship happens unexpectedly. In this case the accident was not planned but what did happen was one of he engineers probaby failed to do his rounds and check things, and therefore missed the fire forward soon enough that they could have easily contained it....perhaps....

As far as Buckhorn and the mining, that's in the next book, which I am finishing now. It's becoming a long tale but I will get there, promise...

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Post by Lady-of-Literature » 12 Apr 2019, 16:36

Hello, I have a question.

DId the love between Louise and Larry still exists in the story or did it fizzle out?

When Lousie told her brothers why she was mad at Larry they just laughed her off and commented on her jealousy and Travis mentioned how they have bickered since before marriage. I have to wonder, were there fights and make up common?

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Post by Charlie Sheldon » 12 Apr 2019, 17:29

I'd say they were very married, but she was very pissed because she was sure he was messing around with another woman. but their love existed, strongly, they were struggling so hard to keep the business going they had no time for each other. There is another thread here speculating Larry willingly died in order to release the insurance funds for Louise (I think that is in that thread) but his accident was not something anyone can plan, believe me.....

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Post by Miriam Molina » 13 Apr 2019, 21:23

I totally enjoyed this book; not a dull moment. The ending was incredible.

But I found grammar slips. I hope you can address those. Is there somewhere I can send the errors I noted?

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Post by Charlie Sheldon » 13 Apr 2019, 22:04

Not knowing the version you got for the review, I cannot answer you, but I think if the file is not the Kindle or printed book, there were a few errors in it, which have since been corrected.

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Post by Charlie Sheldon » 13 Apr 2019, 22:04

Oh and I delighted you enjoyed the book....

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Miriam Molina
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Post by Miriam Molina » 13 Apr 2019, 22:46

Charlie Sheldon wrote: ↑
13 Apr 2019, 22:04
Oh and I delighted you enjoyed the book....
I didn't review the book. I got a Kindle copy which I downloaded a couple days ago. I hope that's not the final version then.

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Post by Charlie Sheldon » 14 Apr 2019, 08:52

It is, so whatever errors there are, are. If you listed them you can send the file to charlisheldon2@gmail.com. I think we can make Kindle corrections......

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Post by Stephanie Elizabeth » 15 Apr 2019, 18:36

Are any of the characters inspired by people you know in real-life?

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Post by Charlie Sheldon » 15 Apr 2019, 19:17

Are any of the characters inspired by people I know in real life? I would say, not really, though the spirit of some of the characters matches the spirit I know in real people. I actively avoid using real people if I can. For some reason with this series especially the characters appear to me nearly fully formed, and I just describe them. One exception is Steve Procida, the captain. In 2016 I had written Adrift and edited it several times and the story was pretty much as it is now, and Steve was my first mate on a ship I was bosun on, and we spent days in the yard together when the ship was in dry dock doing these tsks which reuired a lot of waiting around for others. Steve heard about my tales and told me to use his name for the captain, so I did. There is a real Steve Procida, great guy still sailing. The real Steve does not have a disabled son or such family issues, but weirdly enough he looks exactly like my fictional Steve who I first wrote two years earlier. I warned him of this, said it was a total coincidence. And it was and is.....

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Post by DC Brown » 16 Apr 2019, 21:45

I read Adrift before I read Strong Heart. I'd love to know more about Sarah. She seems a fascinating character. Also, like others, I'd like to see how the fire started. And what were the objects in the tunnel? What did the Blackthorn people take off the boat when it was supposed to be sequestered?
Looking forward to more of your work!!

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Post by Charlie Sheldon » 16 Apr 2019, 22:04

It is always best, I think, for a reader to want more of a character, not less. I wanted to write books with strong women, in roles women usually are not given, so for example I had Sarah as the youth in Strong Heart not a young boy (much more traditional especially a camping book). I hope my readers want to more about my characters, that means I have succeeded. Ship fires can start for many reasons, usually an electrical short of some kind, though engine room fires can happen with the heat and these are the worst. For an answer to the question about the objects in the tunnel, or what was taken off the boat, all will be revealed in the next book....perhaps....

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Post by janinewesterweel » 17 Apr 2019, 03:26

Charlie Sheldon wrote: ↑
09 Apr 2019, 07:45
Sea instead of wave or swell - in the fish sector, and the deep sea maritime sector, we talk about a "sea" the same way you'd say "wave". Must be convention, as in, "Big seas out there..." NOAA does weather forecasts four times a day and the terminology they used was not "wave height" but "sea height". But to be honest I use the word because I like it. As far as "sea boarding" the termnology is "come aboard" or "he boarded the vessel" so when a sea crashes against and onto the ship "a sea boarded" seems an excellent way of stating it...
I also noted your use of the word "sea" with interest and I love your answer! To me, that's the epitome of "poetic license"! :D
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Post by wordslinger42 » 17 Apr 2019, 10:19

What was your favorite thing about writing this book?

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Post by Charlie Sheldon » 17 Apr 2019, 10:48

I would say four things - 1) most of all the entire process, which is really an exercise in faith, that various characters and plot lines and a general vague concept of a tale evolves into a story. This takes time, thought, reflection, tinkering, and hard judgement. It takes at least one and hopefully more outside critical editors. But there is a sort of magic in watching a story become real of itself, and then something happens and the story beings to speak to the author and suggest where things should go next. This is a rare and wonderful feeling, and it is never certain it will happen; 2) I got some great advice from deep sea tug masters and others about how to seize and tow a ship, which was a gift and great fun; 3) I asked captains and sailors to read the tale and comment and was flattered and delighted they found the tale accurate and real, and I got good reviews from authors I totally respect and value; and 4) the structure I have been using of many characters and points of view, all telling pieces of the same story, with the time links being pretty linear but the points of view shifting, without a "main" character, has been a risk, is not traditional or a norm, and it has been great to see people enjoying this structure and engaged in it.

I did not answer your question, because I don't mind very well. The favorite thing in the end is that readers enjoy it, get lost in the characters. There is no higher praise or value than someone saying they wanted to know more of the characters, did not want the tale to end because they were invested in the characters....keeps me going, that....because I am using the same structure in the next tale or tales in this group of books....

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