Would you use Beljanski's Cancer Protocol?

Use this forum to discuss the January 2019 Book of the month "Winning the War on Cancer" by Sylvie Beljanski
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cristinaro
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Re: Would you use Beljanski's Cancer Protocol?

Post by cristinaro » 31 Jan 2019, 05:17

I wouldn't use them as prevention methods, but I think I'd try them if I were diagnosed with cancer. I am a strong believer in alternative means of treatment.
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Post by Mrudolph30 » 31 Jan 2019, 22:02

I would use them in conjunction with the traditional radiation and chemo treatments. She mentioned there was evidence that they worked alongside radiation and chemo, and that way you are covering your bases. I'm not sure I trust the body of research enough yet to take them on their own if I were to be diagnosed with cancer.

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Post by KSaxer » 01 Feb 2019, 14:28

If I was diagnosed with cancer, I would definitely use the supplements. I want to survive and I don't my children's childhood to be filled with memories of me being sick and weak. As for preventive, maybe. Outside of some tendonitis, I don't have big health issues.

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Post by T_stone » 02 Feb 2019, 13:31

I think Beljansji's cancer treatments as both preventive measures, and a cure as well. Preventing cancer is better than curing it.
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Post by FictionLover » 03 Feb 2019, 12:54

steigerd wrote:
28 Jan 2019, 19:20
Absolutely not. Treatment is always a guessing game as it is, but with the advancement in the patient-directed therapy, I would rather chance on the treatment based off of my gene panel or DNA panel.
Did you read the book? She explains why cancers are not always genetically based.
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Post by BelleReadsNietzsche » 03 Feb 2019, 18:29

I think it would be dangerous to use this protocol only, without also utilizing other methods recommended by one's own personal doctors. But while I personally love to use additional herbal treatments in general, I think the fact that they often cannot be relied on as the primary treatment method speaks for itself. The recommendations for cancer prevention seem mostly harmless/helpful to incorporate.
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Post by steigerd » 03 Feb 2019, 22:40

Yes, I did, but I was stating my opinion. I worked in Cancer Research for over 15 years. Not all cancers are DNA based or treatments available. One will reach a point in their treatment regimen when all that is left is comfort care. I have used alternative medicines and I have seen them work in some situations. I have also seen prayer work, as well as treatments by medicine men. But the question was would I use this protocol. My answer then is no. I would continue to support what clinical trials have proven. Also, I would make the choice of treatment lines based on the results of the research. Research also shows what does not work or make any difference in the length of life. I still lean toward DNA directed care.

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Post by FictionLover » 04 Feb 2019, 08:25

steigerd wrote:
03 Feb 2019, 22:40
Yes, I did, but I was stating my opinion. I worked in Cancer Research for over 15 years. Not all cancers are DNA based or treatments available. One will reach a point in their treatment regimen when all that is left is comfort care. I have used alternative medicines and I have seen them work in some situations. I have also seen prayer work, as well as treatments by medicine men. But the question was would I use this protocol. My answer then is no. I would continue to support what clinical trials have proven. Also, I would make the choice of treatment lines based on the results of the research. Research also shows what does not work or make any difference in the length of life. I still lean toward DNA directed care.
Thanks for answering. It seems very difficult getting any kind of dialog going in these threads.

Since you worked in cancer research, maybe you can explain to me why you would go with clinical trials over the research she presents? Do you think her research samples are too small? Or do you think they are not clinically based enough?

Even though you stated that not all cancers are DNA based, you lean toward DNA directed care. Can you explain why?

Thanks :techie-studyingbrown:
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Post by steigerd » 04 Feb 2019, 13:17

It would take pages to explain the clinical trial process which is filled with checks and balances. First impressions are that the research is in a small population and in a limited population mostly French and Belgium. A clinical trial has to have a diverse population with strict inclusion and exclusion criteria. Also, the results have to be repeatable in several clinical trials with a larger and larger diversified population. Yes, the system for the running of a clinical trial is flawed in some ways and the costs are astronomical but do we have an alternative. The stories of failures make the news, but what do you hear of the successes. I could find only 1 US Trial listed on Clinical Trials.gov researching the protocol which was only performed on 32 patients. The paper published states there was an improvement, but it was a single group assignment with no control group. Other studies are still in vitro an in vivo in mice. The protocol may be proven successful in the future, but currently, I don't see enough proof. I have seen Phase 3 trials performed on 300-1000 patients not be proven after being successful during all previous phases of clinical trials. I have even seen drugs removed from the market after being approved because of an unknown side effect or another non-pharmacological agent or treatment regimen is more beneficial. Even after treatment is approved research is still performed to continually measure effectiveness. My response to your question about DNA directed therapy. I believe in Personalized Cancer Medicine which looks at a person's genetic makeup and tumor growth. This helps find more effective ways to prevent, screen and treat. Cancer.Net has information about Personalized Cancer Medicine. So why would I go to the doctor and take chemotherapy to say breast cancer with all the side effects when it might even not work. If I do the testing for ER, PR, and HER2 then I would know which treatment is most likely to lower recurrence rate. I believe research is the answer.

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Post by FictionLover » 04 Feb 2019, 14:51

Interesting. Thanks.
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Post by Susmita Biswas » 05 Feb 2019, 02:43

Yes I would use the protocols.

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