Is this book an opinion or result of a research?

Use this forum to discuss the January 2019 Book of the month "Winning the War on Cancer" by Sylvie Beljanski
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amybo82
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Re: Is this book an opinion or result of a research?

Post by amybo82 » 22 Jan 2019, 06:34

Helen_Combe wrote:
01 Jan 2019, 17:31
edith38 wrote:
01 Jan 2019, 10:22
The author has a degree in law not in any form of medicine, research or health. However, she bases her claims on her father's work who was a molecular biologist and she is speaking in the name of a company that aim is to "brings together science and nature to create high quality, innovative health and beauty products". Do you feel that the book is based on a sufficient level of research to back its claims?
Well, my dad was a Royal Marine, but that doesn’t make me a military expert. I take a rather dim view on this kind of book. Coming from a country which has a national health service which would welcome less expensive cancer care, I’m not so open to the conspiracy theory angles.
The survival rates for breast cancer have improved considerably over the last few years, entirely down to mainstream research. I have had cancer treatment myself and had no end of people prescribing mushrooms, honey and positive thinking to me. I would just roll my eyes and go for my next chemo session.
And my hair came back curly.
RESULT!
First, I am sorry you’ve had to experience treatments. I wouldn’t wish the side effects on anyone. I’m glad you got curly hair out of the deal, though!
Secondly, you said exactly what I was thinking! My mom is a professional baker, and my dad was a chemist. I did not inherit skills in either of those fields! Despite working alongside my mother in the kitchen and watching my dad speak about molecular structures for years, I still couldn’t bake a cake without a recipe or tell you what elements compose complex forms. I know enough to be dangerous but certainly not enough to be an expert!
A book is a dream that you hold in your hand. –Neil Gaiman

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dreamthewilderness
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Post by dreamthewilderness » 23 Jan 2019, 00:47

The fact that there is not enough research is exactly the point of Sylvie Beljanski's book. However, that doesn't mean it's merely opinion, either. She cites several different papers from a variety of sources backing up her claims throughout the book. She calls for further inquiry to back up what her father has already discovered (because that's the only way the academic world will accept his discoveries as valid). Might I add, one can be a lawyer and yet have the capacity to understand basic genetics.

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Post by briellejee » 23 Jan 2019, 01:44

Al Chakauya wrote:
17 Jan 2019, 11:37
She used her father's research and they call it meta-analysis research and it's taken to be valid as long as the research follows all scientific protocol of research findings. So for me it's a valid book because the author emphasises on the need for chemotherapy on top of the natural remedies.
Yes! meta-analysis is a form of research based on other research papers, like this one. Although, this book still contains her biased opinions.
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Post by indepaintence » 23 Jan 2019, 18:22

Thank you for bringing this critical viewpoint. I think this is an important question to ask of this kind of book. I find it rides the line between an autobiography and historical fiction despite presenting itself as non-fiction - it's certainly not a scientific work. A hard look at what sources are there (though the author leaves many claims entirely unsupported) shows that the vast majority of the author's sources are insular and nepotistic. She largely pulls from her father's research, peer-reviewed or not, and her own foundation. Regardless of the author's background, she needs many, many more legitimate, published sources outside of herself and her father to have credibility.

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Post by rubinelli » 24 Jan 2019, 15:36

After reading the book, it is clear that the author put a lot of time and effort into understanding the basics of biology, even referencing biology's central dogma and reverse transcriptase. The amount of research she did on her own, even without a formal degree, is enough for me to believe that the book is based on research rather than opinion.

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Post by meghankelly009 » 24 Jan 2019, 16:04

I am generally hesitant to jump on "conspiracy theories" and I have not finished this book yet, but I will say that her writing is very convincing and she seems to bring in experts ideas as well as her own. Overall, it is still an opinion. I think in order to fully take this book as written truth, there would need to be more discussion with people and experts who refute it.

However, to answer the question, "Do you feel that the book is based on a sufficient level of research to back its claims?" I would say that is has a decent amount of research backing it, but had it been written by the people who have conducted the research, it may have been more successful in coming across as "truth" since it would probably have presented more questions against her ideas and been able to refute the critics for effectively

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Post by BeatrixPotter » 24 Jan 2019, 16:30

It seems to be mostly opinion. Although it references research, it doesn't seem to be a balanced viewpoint.
"There's so much more to a book than just the reading."
-- Maurice Sendak

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Post by Browlyns » 25 Jan 2019, 03:43

In my understanding I think this book is more of an opinion since most research here have not been accepted by contemporary medical boards.

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Post by praisecrown8 » 25 Jan 2019, 14:01

It is as result of a research.

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Post by amandathebibliophile » 25 Jan 2019, 15:22

Even though her official background was originally in law, based on her story, and more importantly, the science she ultimately learned through her journey, I would 100% argue that the book is research based. I would also argue that especially BECAUSE her original background was in law, she would know better than to make a bunch of major claims without doing all the research necessary to go public. I also think the website speaks for itself -- not to mention the enormous body of published scientific works that illustrate the many points she makes in her book. I thought this was an EXCELLENT book.

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Post by Jsovermyer » 25 Jan 2019, 20:45

The author is reporting on the research of her father, who was a medical researcher. The information in the book could be used to treat people wirh cancer, but more testing should be done to prove it's effectiveness.

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Post by briellejee » 26 Jan 2019, 04:35

indepaintence wrote:
23 Jan 2019, 18:22
Thank you for bringing this critical viewpoint. I think this is an important question to ask of this kind of book. I find it rides the line between an autobiography and historical fiction despite presenting itself as non-fiction - it's certainly not a scientific work. A hard look at what sources are there (though the author leaves many claims entirely unsupported) shows that the vast majority of the author's sources are insular and nepotistic. She largely pulls from her father's research, peer-reviewed or not, and her own foundation. Regardless of the author's background, she needs many, many more legitimate, published sources outside of herself and her father to have credibility.
This seems to be a good point and a fresh perspective. Though there were sources cited, I guess I do agree with you that they are nepotistic. Thanks for this viewpoint - it really changed the way I see this book! :tiphat:
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Post by indepaintence » 26 Jan 2019, 21:10

briellejee wrote:
26 Jan 2019, 04:35
indepaintence wrote:
23 Jan 2019, 18:22
Thank you for bringing this critical viewpoint. I think this is an important question to ask of this kind of book. I find it rides the line between an autobiography and historical fiction despite presenting itself as non-fiction - it's certainly not a scientific work. A hard look at what sources are there (though the author leaves many claims entirely unsupported) shows that the vast majority of the author's sources are insular and nepotistic. She largely pulls from her father's research, peer-reviewed or not, and her own foundation. Regardless of the author's background, she needs many, many more legitimate, published sources outside of herself and her father to have credibility.
This seems to be a good point and a fresh perspective. Though there were sources cited, I guess I do agree with you that they are nepotistic. Thanks for this viewpoint - it really changed the way I see this book! :tiphat:
Thanks! I think my original post may have been just a little harsh, there were two strong sources supporting her father's research from Columbia University. However, I still wish that there were more outside sources so that I could sit back and enjoy! I felt like I had to be skeptical while reading because of how many missing citations there seemed to be. :techie-studyingbrown:

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Post by Joe Hadithi » 30 Jan 2019, 08:29

The author's father did the hard work, the daughter has also sought help from experts in the field but it still isn't as good as if it came from the horse's mouth...

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Post by mamilla93 » 30 Jan 2019, 21:22

How about its her opinion based on her father's research? I don't think that qualifies as her research given it is her father's research and her background isn't in science.

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