Is this book convincing / attractive to sceptics?

Use this forum to discuss the January 2019 Book of the month "Winning the War on Cancer" by Sylvie Beljanski
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Taylor Danvers
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Re: Is this book convincing / attractive to sceptics?

Post by Taylor Danvers » 23 Jan 2019, 00:11

I think the title itself sounds like a marketing strategy but anyone who takes their time to actually read the book and was not convinced by the title might be convinced by the content.

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nonamer_miss
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Post by nonamer_miss » 23 Jan 2019, 16:53

As for me, who lives in a developing country, where majority of people do not have access to traditional treatments, I think people will be drawn to a lot cheaper alternatives.

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indepaintence
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Post by indepaintence » 23 Jan 2019, 20:18

I am strongly inclined to believe in the merits of natural medicines, however this book left a terrible impression on me. While before reading I was open to the possibilities that these extracts may offer, after finishing it I find myself highly skeptical. The author did not write this in a scientific fashion - it was an autobiography - and left so many important points entirely uncited. I don't think this book is going to change any skeptical minds, and the extreme unscientific-ness of it does harm to an already scrutinized field.

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Post by Jsovermyer » 25 Jan 2019, 21:22

The book is interesting and thought-provoking, but it is not enough to make me a believer.. I am still skeptical.

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Post by skindrukas » 26 Jan 2019, 16:52

When it comes to my health, I'm very skeptical about everything. I double check my doctors, I give them tonnes of annoying questions... I'm disappointed by both - western medicine and alternative as they failed me many times. There is no way I'm gonna believe something I read unless I tried it and got a positive effect. So far, I believe that our technologies are far from understanding completely how to fix our bodies.
The temple bell stops but I still hear the sound coming out of the flowers. --- Matsuo Basho

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Post by briellejee » 27 Jan 2019, 23:28

indepaintence wrote:
23 Jan 2019, 20:18
I am strongly inclined to believe in the merits of natural medicines, however this book left a terrible impression on me. While before reading I was open to the possibilities that these extracts may offer, after finishing it I find myself highly skeptical. The author did not write this in a scientific fashion - it was an autobiography - and left so many important points entirely uncited. I don't think this book is going to change any skeptical minds, and the extreme unscientific-ness of it does harm to an already scrutinized field.
It was an attempt to open some new alternatives - which may or may not work to all - and share the story if her father's dedication to research. I find that attempt pure at first, but then, after finishing the book, I realized it was also an attempt to sell their products - which was a bit shady for me. As a skeptic but with an open mind since I work in the field of science and research, I find this a little too confident, thus doubtful. :tiphat:
Comment on my reviews and I'll comment on yours too! :wink:

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Post by timd » 28 Jan 2019, 13:45

I am a bit of a sceptic mainly because of some of the preposterous claims that one sees in adverts and on popular tv shows. However, I have also seen some wonderful natural remedies that have worked. I just get annoyed when proponents of natural healing make incorrect statements such as talking about natural vitamin c and synthetic vitamin c. They are both ascorbic acid and there is no difference between the two. This sort of fault attracts unwelcome criticism from hard-boiled sceptics

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Post by indepaintence » 28 Jan 2019, 16:37

briellejee wrote:
27 Jan 2019, 23:28
indepaintence wrote:
23 Jan 2019, 20:18
I am strongly inclined to believe in the merits of natural medicines, however this book left a terrible impression on me. While before reading I was open to the possibilities that these extracts may offer, after finishing it I find myself highly skeptical. The author did not write this in a scientific fashion - it was an autobiography - and left so many important points entirely uncited. I don't think this book is going to change any skeptical minds, and the extreme unscientific-ness of it does harm to an already scrutinized field.
It was an attempt to open some new alternatives - which may or may not work to all - and share the story if her father's dedication to research. I find that attempt pure at first, but then, after finishing the book, I realized it was also an attempt to sell their products - which was a bit shady for me. As a skeptic but with an open mind since I work in the field of science and research, I find this a little too confident, thus doubtful. :tiphat:
I think it's smart to point out its confidence - that's a really good way to put it to words! The selling worries me too. Thanks for your thoughts :)

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Post by HRichards » 29 Jan 2019, 15:02

The book makes a lot of good points, but I take everything with a grain of salt.

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Post by BelleReadsNietzsche » 29 Jan 2019, 21:24

indepaintence wrote:
28 Jan 2019, 16:37
briellejee wrote:
27 Jan 2019, 23:28
indepaintence wrote:
23 Jan 2019, 20:18
I am strongly inclined to believe in the merits of natural medicines, however this book left a terrible impression on me. While before reading I was open to the possibilities that these extracts may offer, after finishing it I find myself highly skeptical. The author did not write this in a scientific fashion - it was an autobiography - and left so many important points entirely uncited. I don't think this book is going to change any skeptical minds, and the extreme unscientific-ness of it does harm to an already scrutinized field.
It was an attempt to open some new alternatives - which may or may not work to all - and share the story if her father's dedication to research. I find that attempt pure at first, but then, after finishing the book, I realized it was also an attempt to sell their products - which was a bit shady for me. As a skeptic but with an open mind since I work in the field of science and research, I find this a little too confident, thus doubtful. :tiphat:
I think it's smart to point out its confidence - that's a really good way to put it to words! The selling worries me too. Thanks for your thoughts :)
I have to agree. I find it really disheartening the current state of medicine in the West, especially in the U.S. On the one hand, the medical community and the pharmaceutical industry have lost so much trust for so many documentable, valid reasons. On the other hand, that complete loss of trust in the medical industry leaves people open to people who have no real hard data on what helps and who may just as much be looking to "make a buck" as the medical industries are.

I've heard people say that this book is trustworthy because it is written by a lawyer- and I guess lawyers are smart? They are, of course, but that's no guarantee for me. Doctors are smart too! I've also heard people say that the book is trustworthy because they aren't trying to make money like the pharmaceutical industry is; but obviously that isn't true because at minimum they are trying to sell a book! And then there's the product element you've noted. Both views strike me as misguided- but especially the latter.

The other thing with alternatives that "may or may not work at all"- often people take these recommendations as "they will work". People are often looking for guarantees that mainstream medicine (if being practiced ethically) cannot give them. Sometimes this means false hope, and sometimes this means foregoing treatments that could actually help in favor of treatments that might not do much.

However, I do think the medical industry would do well to change many things about their approach in order to leave people feeling less alone, less confused, more listened to, more in control, and to help people make choices based on what they value...

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Post by cristinaro » 31 Jan 2019, 05:34

I sincerely hope the book would attract sceptics too, especially since the author's claims are backed by scientific and statistical data as well as professional studies in the field.
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Post by KSaxer » 01 Feb 2019, 14:21

Because the author presented her story in such a non-aggressive manner, I am willing to consider it. The overall impression I got was that the Beljanski's were promoting a dual treatment approach to battling cancer. I feel there is great merit in this. I personally have benefitted from alternative medicine through chiropractic care and physical therapy. I also felt that her supporting the concepts with the science behind them did a lot to sway the part of my brain that is not so open to alternatives.

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Post by dreamthewilderness » 02 Feb 2019, 23:03

Y'know, a lot of skeptics might look at the book and scoff, never giving the book a chance. Those that do venture would probably have their convictions shaken a bit - the claims are substantiated both in the information in the text as well as in numerous citations throughout the book. That research could certainly be strengthened, but the book makes a solid argument nonetheless.

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Post by lotus784 » 04 Feb 2019, 22:09

I truly believe in the power of a good natural remedy. I personally use tea and essential oils whenever I'm feeling a little under the weather. I really do believe there are ways to fight cancer besides the typical medical route.

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Post by ShailaSheshadri » 05 Feb 2019, 00:17

We all know cancer is a deadly disease. A majority of the cancer patients prefer going for proven medical treatment rather than for alternative treatment, even though it is a natural alternative. Hence, natural treatment options carrying enough proof might attract more patients.

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