Shifting attitude to women

Use this forum to discuss the October Book of the Month "McDowell" by William H. Coles.
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Ayat paarsa
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Re: Shifting attitude to women

Post by Ayat paarsa » 22 Oct 2018, 06:52

I think overwhelming loneliness was just a cause, but the change in his behavior was an actual shift. He really was changed into a grown up human being.
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Post by Lil Reads » 24 Oct 2018, 18:54

jwalker73 wrote:
10 Oct 2018, 01:44
Did anyone else find it interesting that McDowell, a character who made it clear from the start of the novel that he held a low opinion of women, eventually learnt some of his greatest life lessons from several of the females he encountered later in the story. I felt that McDowell seemed to find his most meaningful connections with characters such as Maud, Hulga and Winona. He even risked his own personal safety to save the life of another woman. Do you think this subtle shift reflected growth in his character as a human being, or solely a response to overwhelming loneliness?
I'm wondering if his early attitude to women actually made those connections more meaningful since he underestimated them then they showed him important life lessons which stunned him.

If he had been more respectful to women in the beginning, would he have overlooked the advice from women?
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Post by Sweet Psamy » 27 Oct 2018, 11:57

It reflected a huge improvement in his character. Those were some of the noticeable transformations in his life.

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Post by asere_maryanne » 27 Oct 2018, 12:37

He probably got to learn of their value in his life and how the women changed him to a better person. This made him appreciate who they were.

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Post by Radiant3 » 30 Oct 2018, 10:48

I think as Hiram was going through a difficult time he became more in touch with his emotional side. He needed those women in his life, they helped him grow and change as a person. I think women, in general, are more connected to their emotions that is why in the book they had such a profound effect on Hiram.

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Post by HollandBlue » 30 Oct 2018, 10:57

I think Hiram totally disrespected women in the beginning of the book, and that by the end of the book, his attitude towards women had softened slightly.
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Post by writer808 » 30 Oct 2018, 11:27

yes and it was a very interesting point.Initially he was having negative impression of women but without even realizing he had taken impact from them

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Post by Amy+++ » 01 Nov 2018, 12:13

I'd say he had a shift in his opinion of women. If he was willing to save a woman and take lessons from many other women, then to me it sounds like he has changed his mind about women.

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Post by ShailaSheshadri » 01 Nov 2018, 21:44

Mc Dowell didn't ill-treat any women. However, showed more importance to males than females. You can notice that he helped his daughter Sophie when she was in trouble and financed her. Later, when he was roaming from place to place as a fugitive, he encountered a few women. The women helped him, and he too helped the females in return. I think he changed himself a bit because of his loneliness.

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Post by sarahmarlowe » 01 Nov 2018, 21:54

I believe the change was character growth. I did not like anything about his character to begin with. What a jerk! I believe he saw other people as chess pieces in his game, and he certainly didn’t think much of women. When he was on the run, he was able to see the genuine kindness of other people, and he responded to that.
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Post by lovetoread86 » 01 Nov 2018, 22:31

What a great question, is it growth or loneliness? I think that it starts with the extreme loneliness he is experiencing around the time he meets Maud but slowly he is growing and learning from such a drastic change from his former life.

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Post by cristinaro » 09 Nov 2018, 10:31

The fact that he surrounds himself with women is yet another reflection of his downgrading attitude toward them. I think he actually feels more powerful in their presence and even when he shows compassion or helps them, he does this only to reassess his superiority.
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Post by Fozia-Bajwa » 09 Nov 2018, 16:42

McDowell is the an abuser of women. Wherever he was, he is making victim to the different ladies. At home, he ignores his wife and at the place of his professional activities he plays with women like a game. He thinks women are only the source of entertainment for him and nothing more.

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Post by Farida Bali » 10 Nov 2018, 09:23

I don't think it was loneliness, I think he just became more compassionate, it's called character development.

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Post by Farida Bali » 10 Nov 2018, 09:25

Fozia-Bajwa wrote:
09 Nov 2018, 16:42
McDowell is the an abuser of women. Wherever he was, he is making victim to the different ladies. At home, he ignores his wife and at the place of his professional activities he plays with women like a game. He thinks women are only the source of entertainment for him and nothing more.
But his attitude towards women changed significantly after meeting Maud, her daughter and Hulga.

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