Women's Roles

Use this forum to discuss the September Book of the Month "Apollo's Raven" by Linnea Tanner.
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billion1
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Re: Women's Roles

Post by billion1 »

the role of the women have being fairly analized. In time past women were not given enough avenue to express and discover themselves. I realy appreciate the writer and all my fellow reviewers who believe and surport our women

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CommMayo
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Post by CommMayo »

ShareTheGift wrote:
20 Sep 2018, 11:49
I noticed that there were a couple of posts debating whether there were actually Celts or not. They were referenced by the Greek in writing as early as 500 BC as "Keltoi" and their migration patterned tracked.

Unfortunately, they themselves had no early written history. Their history and observations being written by others. Old Irish would be the most similar language. All those vowels make for some difficult pronounciation!
This is really interesting. It is a shame that we need to view the Celtic history through the lens of outsiders. I might have to go and see if I can find some YouTube videos of Old Irish now. You have me curious!

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Post by grace8031 »

Today's world is like the Celts women are respected as well as their opinion which was contrary to what Romans practiced. In their view women were like trophies

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Zain A Blade
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Post by Zain A Blade »

There was certainly a clear difference in the depiction of the way the two camps treated women. In any case, I like the authentic way that the author treated Roman misogyny. I remember that the Roman council actually debated whether women had a soul (or whether it was ok to kill them like animals). Thank God I was born in this time and age.

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Post by Rodrigo Niguez »

Celts were a more advanced society than the Romans. They unlike the Romans respected and valued their women. They sought advice from their women. I think that isa proper portrayal of their women as strong women.

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Post by AliceofX »

Rodrigo Niguez wrote:
21 Sep 2018, 15:17
Celts were a more advanced society than the Romans.
How so? I'm not saying we should take the Roman view that they were uncivilized barbarians a 100% seriously, but the Celts didn't even leave behind their own writings by which we could judge them. To say that they were more advanced than the Romans is a very bold statement.

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Post by Princeroland »

The Celt did it right by allowing the women to choose their own husband themselves, it portrays alot of equality between both genders, at least women in the novel had a great influence in the society more than Roman women, because the Romans' treated their women like trash which is not supposed to be

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Post by joycechitwa »

I always love a novel or any narrative which portrays women a strong and capable to hold their own ground. So, for this quality I highly commend the novel and encourage as many people as possible to read it.

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Post by Kgaelsdottir »

I would warmly have to disagree with the statement below about there being no such thing as Celts--one could say the same, from this perspective, that there were no such things as Greeks, or Gauls, or Moors, for that matter... With sincere respect, tribes are often associated across various territories--like the Lakota are in North America--the Celts indeed covered a great deal of ground, but their commonalities, traditions, spirituality, migrations, etc. are what bound them as a culture. There are considered to be six more recent Celtic "kingdoms" or territories: Scotland, Ireland, Wales, Cornwall, Brittany, and the Isle of Man--but before this they originated during the Iron age and can be tracked from the la Tene on.

Again, I warmly respect your opinion, but as someone who has both, genetically, Celt and Viking blood (Iceland and Northern Scotland) running through my veins, I have studied the cultures for many of my 46 years. ;)
So I've been doing some reading and from what I understand there was no such thing as "Celts." Instead, it was various different tribes and people from the British Isles to Anatolia. There is no answer to that question because there was no such thing as a Celtic system.

Besides that, as a history lover, I have grown extremely skeptical about claims of ancient matriarchal or gender-equal societies. There's no solid evidence for them, just wishful thinking that doesn't align with reality. I'm just sick of certain feminists who think rewriting history is going to "inspire women" or something like that when all it does is delegitimize the movement and makes them appear like quacks.

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Post by joshfee77 »

The Romans certainly didn't seem to value the women or treat them with as much respect as the Celts. The Roman attitude reminds me of historical novel Tyrants & Poets I read recently, where women in Ancient Greece were seen very much as commodities to be traded for money or goods. A particularly repressive view which has no valid place in a world where we are all human beings and therefore all of equal value.

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Post by AliceofX »

Kgaelsdottir wrote:
23 Sep 2018, 19:43
I would warmly have to disagree with the statement below about there being no such thing as Celts--one could say the same, from this perspective, that there were no such things as Greeks, or Gauls, or Moors, for that matter...
Looking back on my comment I realize I didn't fully elaborate on what I meant. The original poster, as well as many other commentators, seemed to imply that all Celts had the same identical culture and views on women across all of Europe. You wouldn't say Athenians and Spartans had the same beliefs about gender roles just because they were both Greek, so how can we say the same about Celts? Especially since we know so little about them compared to the Romans.

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Post by haleygerstenberg »

Zain A Blade wrote:
21 Sep 2018, 15:10
There was certainly a clear difference in the depiction of the way the two camps treated women. In any case, I like the authentic way that the author treated Roman misogyny. I remember that the Roman council actually debated whether women had a soul (or whether it was ok to kill them like animals). Thank God I was born in this time and age.
No. Kidding. There are a lot of reasons to be happy I'm not living in ancient Rome, not least of which is the deadly and rampant misogyny...

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Post by Lucas Kalinic »

Roman tradition portrays the place of women in the ancient society. Women and children are second class citizens. On the other hand, I'm marvelled by the Celts civilization.

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Post by mllamisaamadi »

Women's roles,a narration of how Romans and Celts view women,an interesting story accounts that will attracts my further reading to fully under stand the story

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Post by Jmteachmom »

I liked how Linnea Tanner portrayed the differences in how women where treated in the Roman and Celt societies. There were definitely historical differences and it is apparent the author had done her research. Making Catrin a strong warrior in love with a Roman whose culture would not have allowed her to be who she was, is what makes this story so intriguing. I can't wait to read the next installment to see where this love story goes.

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