Is suicide a viable option for Agent Sliver?

Use this forum to discuss August 2018 book of the month "World, Incorporated" by Tom Gariffo.
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Re: Is suicide a viable option for Agent Sliver?

Post by cristinaro » 27 Aug 2018, 11:29

Fozia-Bajwa wrote:
09 Aug 2018, 06:34
No I don't think so he should not think about suicide because suicide is not a viable option for Silver. Rather he should take stand in front of his responsibilities and should perform his duties by awareness.
What do you think his responsibilities would be supposing he is no longer on the supercorporation's payroll?
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Post by cristinaro » 27 Aug 2018, 11:31

Dusamae wrote:
10 Aug 2018, 08:47
No, suicide is never a viable option. He did commit a lot of murders, with mind control he really was unable to make a different choice until it began to wear off or he true self finally started coming through. There is always tomorrow, and he may be able to make a difference in the lives of others. Without the CEO things may be a little different, or not, but if suicide is the option he will never know what possible changes he has or will make.
In a world dominated by supercorporations, what are the chances of one individual to fight and even change the system or at least live independently from the system?
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Post by Beth KG » 27 Aug 2018, 11:31

Yes...and no. If there had been absolutely no other option for Sliver other than to take his own life or to continue killing, then yes. But since there were other options, I agree with a lot of other responders that the most courageous course is to try and make reparations and improve the lives of others somehow.

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Post by cristinaro » 27 Aug 2018, 11:34

msomigreat wrote:
10 Aug 2018, 14:12
Suicide has never been a viable option for anyone even when someone feels that that might be the only option. what is important is how well one can look for other alternative and better opportunities.
Allow me to be the devil's disciple and remind you that nobody has ever come back from the dead to actually tell us some stories about the other world. How do we know that death is not the best alternative?
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Post by cristinaro » 27 Aug 2018, 11:36

Muhammad1039 wrote:
11 Aug 2018, 03:27
No matter how, no matter what, no matter why, no matter when and no matter the situation suicide will never be a last option, it is better to wait for an impossible miracle than to commit suicide. 🙅
Since you're talking in general terms, please allow me to ask you one question: are you afraid to die? Suicide is either an act of great courage or an act of cowardice. It is, after all, only a matter of personal belief and interpretation.
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Post by cristinaro » 27 Aug 2018, 11:38

Michael Kevin wrote:
12 Aug 2018, 01:51
Suicide should always be the last option because if you have the courage to suicide, you will have that courage to continue your living.
Good point. If you ask me, you need more courage to live than to die.
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Post by cristinaro » 27 Aug 2018, 11:43

Tiny_Turtle wrote:
12 Aug 2018, 07:42
SPOILER ALERT: If you haven't read the book yet, you may not want to read my comments. I needed to refer to specifics to justify my conclusion.💕

Suicide is the cowards' way out. Sliver was anything but a coward. He showed that numerous times, like when he saved the Shredders and Kelly. It even took courage to hide that his ship, Franklin, had 'awoken' and become self aware. He especially showed courage when he allowed Shawn Chase to live, for then he wasn't doing something that could be justified by "What they don't know won't hurt 'em."

When he didn't kill Chase he was going against direct indoctrination, not to mention direct orders. The killing had become so deeply ingrained in him, that by not killing he was going against what he believed was the right thing to do, his 'purpose' in life. It takes tremendous courage to go against everything you have been taught to believe is the one and only truth.

So, no, suicide was not a viable option for Sliver. There was no cowardice in him.
What if I am telling you this: I think Sliver would not be a coward if he decided to commit suicide rather than kill another person. What would you do if confronted with such an option? Commit suicide or kill somebody?
P.S. I was under the impression that people commenting here have already read the book. :) No spoiler alert needed.
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Post by cristinaro » 27 Aug 2018, 11:45

Daniella C wrote:
12 Aug 2018, 09:12
In as much as he's traumatized with he's past life. Nevertheless suicide can never be an option, it's only a coward abandons his or her fears because of guilt. He should rather stand up as man and face his responsibility.
What could he do to make amends for his past? Fight against the corporations? Help the families of his victims? How should he pay for his crimes?
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Post by WendyNorth » 27 Aug 2018, 12:43

I think I wouldn't have been surprised if he had committed suicide after the variety of nasty experience he had been through, or dirty deeds he had done. Guilt catches up with people eventually. Though I think Sliver was clearly stronger than that, he didn't make that choice, and I don't think he would have.

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Post by Tiny_Turtle » 27 Aug 2018, 13:33

cristinaro wrote:
27 Aug 2018, 11:43
Tiny_Turtle wrote:
12 Aug 2018, 07:42
SPOILER ALERT: If you haven't read the book yet, you may not want to read my comments. I needed to refer to specifics to justify my conclusion.💕

Suicide is the cowards' way out. Sliver was anything but a coward. He showed that numerous times, like when he saved the Shredders and Kelly. It even took courage to hide that his ship, Franklin, had 'awoken' and become self aware. He especially showed courage when he allowed Shawn Chase to live, for then he wasn't doing something that could be justified by "What they don't know won't hurt 'em."

When he didn't kill Chase he was going against direct indoctrination, not to mention direct orders. The killing had become so deeply ingrained in him, that by not killing he was going against what he believed was the right thing to do, his 'purpose' in life. It takes tremendous courage to go against everything you have been taught to believe is the one and only truth.

So, no, suicide was not a viable option for Sliver. There was no cowardice in him.
What if I am telling you this: I think Sliver would not be a coward if he decided to commit suicide rather than kill another person. What would you do if confronted with such an option? Commit suicide or kill somebody?
P.S. I was under the impression that people commenting here have already read the book. :) No spoiler alert needed.
Wow. You made an absolutely valid point. I hadn't looked at it from that angle. If he committed suicide as the only solution to assure that he would not kill again, then I could see how it would be a viable option.

For me personally, I don't believe I would be able to either. If faced with the choice, I would probably do nothing until whomever was forcing the issue killed me.

As for the spoiler alert, I added that because in a few forums I saw people saying that they hadn't yet read the book being discussed. I do agree that anyone commenting on these particular forums should read the book first, but I'm not sure if it's a prerequisite.

Thank you for your comments. You gave me some things to think about. 💕

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Post by jgraney8 » 27 Aug 2018, 17:36

Suicide would be the easy way out, perhaps. However, agent Sliver seems to alive to choose suicide. By the end of the novel, he seems to be awakening to new possibilities. These possibilities could lead to atonement for his actions. The end of the novel suggests more to come.
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Post by Dusamae » 28 Aug 2018, 07:53

cristinaro wrote:
27 Aug 2018, 11:31
Dusamae wrote:
10 Aug 2018, 08:47
No, suicide is never a viable option. He did commit a lot of murders, with mind control he really was unable to make a different choice until it began to wear off or he true self finally started coming through. There is always tomorrow, and he may be able to make a difference in the lives of others. Without the CEO things may be a little different, or not, but if suicide is the option he will never know what possible changes he has or will make.
In a world dominated by supercorporations, what are the chances of one individual to fight and even change the system or at least live independently from the system?
Where there is one individual to fight there are usually more. It just takes someone like Sliver to start and lead.

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Post by wendos » 30 Aug 2018, 05:17

I think since he carries information that can save many people, suicide can not be a viable option. However, his lifestyle and the fact that he has disobeyed instructions haunts him and this can cause him to contemplate suicide.

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Post by Kibetious » 30 Aug 2018, 07:57

Suicide is a viable option, yes, this is because Agent Silver can kill himself if he chooses to. However, it would be meaningless. He, can instead devote his tactics and strength to help others who may be victims of the same process he was subjected to.
​​​​​​He gives strength to those who are tired; to the ones who lack power, he gives renewed energy :techie-studyinggray:

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Post by BriennaiJ » 02 Sep 2018, 15:00

He might succumb to the guilt and commit suicide, but a better way to atone for his actions if he does feel guilt would be to try to help the families of those he hurt.

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