Romance and time-how is romance different now?

Use this forum to discuss the June 2018 Book of the Month"The Girl Who Knew da Vinci" by Belle Ami
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Morganncall
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Romance and time-how is romance different now?

Post by Morganncall » 20 Jun 2018, 14:33

There are some great couples in this book from three different time periods Fioretta Gorini and Giuliano de Medici, Sophia Caro and the German officer Gerhard Jaeger, and Angela Renatus and Alex Caine. Each have their own story and their own kind of love, but are their stories that different? is romance different in 2018 than it was in the other time periods? if yes, how, and do you think that it's a bad thing that it is different?

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Post by SereneCharles » 21 Jun 2018, 07:34

I don't see much difference in romance between then and now. It has always been filled with wild thoughts/actions and stomach full of butterflies (at least thats how i see it). Its the same now, but taken more advantage of than in the past. People form romantic relationships without any real romance, probably for the money in it.
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Post by kfwilson6 » 21 Jun 2018, 11:55

I think that within this book, each couple treated romance in a very similar way. Each couple was together truly for love. Even though in modern society, in the US and Italy at least, people have 100% authority in choosing who they wish to marry (even so far as to allow same-sex marriages in certain states). In previous centuries, marriages were very contractual. Couples were matched up to benefit the families and to ensure that no one "married down."
Romance was almost forbidden in certain times and in certain cultures. Now romance is something that people strive to have. True love is so strongly sought after. Most people in the US today do not make marriages for some benefit to their finances, statuses, etc.
It's a great thing that people can choose who to spend their life with. It also helps merge people of different social classes. Although it's more likely that someone will marry within their same economic group (middle class will marry middle class) this is no rule that is set in stone. Ever seen Maid in Manhattan? :)

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Post by Dael Reader » 21 Jun 2018, 19:54

Frankly, I didn't think any of the couples in this book were in the midst of romance. Most of what we see of them has more to do with lust. Romance involves time spent together, talking, laughing, learning more about each other. All we really see about the couples here are their insatiable desire for sex.

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Post by pricklypurple » 21 Jun 2018, 20:57

I actually think romance is very different now. Nothing is done slowly anymore. Not as much time and thought are put into things. Unfortunately this is true of our modern day entertainment as well as our relationships.

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Post by holsam_87 » 22 Jun 2018, 01:49

Morganncall wrote:
20 Jun 2018, 14:33
There are some great couples in this book from three different time periods Fioretta Gorini and Giuliano de Medici, Sophia Caro and the German officer Gerhard Jaeger, and Angela Renatus and Alex Caine. Each have their own story and their own kind of love, but are their stories that different? is romance different in 2018 than it was in the other time periods? if yes, how, and do you think that it's a bad thing that it is different?
It seems that romance is a bit different, considering that people have other ways to date now. Such as the use of dating websites or apps that give people a chance to build a connection before actually meeting face to face.
Samantha Holtsclaw

“We’ve all got both light and dark inside us. What matters is the part we choose to act on. That’s who we really are.”

—J. K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix

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Post by kfwilson6 » 22 Jun 2018, 08:46

Dael Reader wrote:
21 Jun 2018, 19:54
Frankly, I didn't think any of the couples in this book were in the midst of romance. Most of what we see of them has more to do with lust. Romance involves time spent together, talking, laughing, learning more about each other. All we really see about the couples here are their insatiable desire for sex.
Matches up well with modern society though doesn't it :lol2:
Some people in every time period want a true love story and some of them just want a physical relationship. And, the book actually mimics reality in it's claim to be romance when it's really not that much about relationship building. This also happens in real-life relationships. One person thinks it's all about having a good time and the other thinks it's about building a future.

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Morganncall
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Post by Morganncall » 22 Jun 2018, 12:18

kfwilson6 wrote:
21 Jun 2018, 11:55
I think that within this book, each couple treated romance in a very similar way. Each couple was together truly for love. Even though in modern society, in the US and Italy at least, people have 100% authority in choosing who they wish to marry (even so far as to allow same-sex marriages in certain states). In previous centuries, marriages were very contractual. Couples were matched up to benefit the families and to ensure that no one "married down."
Romance was almost forbidden in certain times and in certain cultures. Now romance is something that people strive to have. True love is so strongly sought after. Most people in the US today do not make marriages for some benefit to their finances, statuses, etc.
It's a great thing that people can choose who to spend their life with. It also helps merge people of different social classes. Although it's more likely that someone will marry within their same economic group (middle class will marry middle class) this is no rule that is set in stone. Ever seen Maid in Manhattan? :)
I totally agree. I feel like even 100 years ago people didn't have the ability as much to marry for love. in the book Modern Romance by Aziz Ansari he talks about how we have to ability in the modern world to search the world over for ramance and love, but in previous generations, most people married whoever the closest, best suited person was. Also, I LOVE Maid in Manhattan.

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Post by Sarah Tariq » 22 Jun 2018, 13:10

All the love stories have different atmosphere and social circumstances. So I think these are different from each other. But the love is a universal phenomenon which is same in all ages.
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Post by Dael Reader » 22 Jun 2018, 14:12

kfwilson6 wrote:
22 Jun 2018, 08:46
Dael Reader wrote:
21 Jun 2018, 19:54
Frankly, I didn't think any of the couples in this book were in the midst of romance. Most of what we see of them has more to do with lust. Romance involves time spent together, talking, laughing, learning more about each other. All we really see about the couples here are their insatiable desire for sex.
Matches up well with modern society though doesn't it :lol2:
Some people in every time period want a true love story and some of them just want a physical relationship. And, the book actually mimics reality in it's claim to be romance when it's really not that much about relationship building. This also happens in real-life relationships. One person thinks it's all about having a good time and the other thinks it's about building a future.
Sad but true.

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Post by bclayton13 » 22 Jun 2018, 23:06

I think romance is a lot more different now, we have different expectations as to what romance really is. In the past, a girl's best hope was to marry someone she could stand. Now, we want it all. Women are certainly more empowered than they were, and we know we have a right to want more. Even more, we can fall in love with people across the world thanks to the magic of the internet! We're not isolated anymore, that's for sure.

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Post by AWANDO OGUTU » 24 Jun 2018, 07:53

For all I can remember, there is little difference between today's romance and that of the 1960s. Romance still largely remains one sided with expectations on men to be romantic in all scenarios.

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Post by princessERI » 24 Jun 2018, 09:02

In my opinion, there is surely a gap of difference in the romance from before and the current. There are still similarities found like short and long time romances, unrequited loves, love affairs, etc. I believe that the big difference are the factors added which include the norms of today, the evolving culture, laws, technology and society. No matter what timeline is, love and romances are the same they are just different in shapes and forms.

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Post by jrmeans09 » 24 Jun 2018, 11:38

I think traditions change with time- the ways that you show someone you’re interested and the courtship (is it long or short etc), and the wedding traditions... but love itself doesn’t change. It’s still feeling that infatuation, which slowly becomes deeper. You start seeing them as beautiful even when they’re all groggy from sleep. You overlook when they’re grumpy and you stop feeling like you have to impress them all the time because you know they look past your faults too.

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Post by lindsaysherlock » 24 Jun 2018, 13:11

I think romance is much better now than it used to be. Women have more freedom to choose who they love.

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