Do you think Belle Ami will write more books around Angela and Alex?

Use this forum to discuss the June 2018 Book of the Month"The Girl Who Knew da Vinci" by Belle Ami
Post Reply
User avatar
bookowlie
Special Discussion Leader
Posts: 7739
Joined: 25 Oct 2014, 09:52
2017 Reading Goal: 52
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 50
Favorite Book: The Lost Continent
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 322
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-bookowlie.html
Latest Review: Norman by Michelle Olson

Re: Do you think Belle Ami will write more books around Angela and Alex?

Post by bookowlie » 30 Jun 2018, 09:08

greenstripedgiraffe wrote:
28 Jun 2018, 15:28
Bookowlie - I agree with this. I think the problem was mostly in expecting historical fiction and finding romance :D There are plenty who would find a lot of appeal in Ami's book.
Well, judging from the lively discussion here, I think more readers liked the way the author blended the different genres. This book seemed to attract more OBC readers compared with some of the other BOTM picks. It might be because some of the previous selections contained one genre such as sci-fi or horror.
"I am not afraid of storms, for I am learning how to sail my ship" - Louisa May Alcott

User avatar
Bonnie Shelby
Posts: 346
Joined: 12 May 2018, 20:07
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 78
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-bonnie-shelby.html
Latest Review: Apollo's Raven by Linnea Tanner
Reading Device: B00IKPYKWG

Post by Bonnie Shelby » 30 Jun 2018, 09:54

Dael Reader wrote:
10 Jun 2018, 11:05
She probably will. But I wish she wouldn't. Not unless she does enough research to base the plot lines more solidly on art history. If Angela and Alex can start solving art mysterious with a more academic approach, rather than based on Angela's ridiculous past-life regression/spirit possession episodes, the stories could be a little bit more interesting. If she keeps basing the stories on sex scenes past and present, there will be very little to recommend about the books.
I agree. If she doesn't find a way to add some complexity to the plot, I'm not so sure the next book will be worth reading.

User avatar
bookowlie
Special Discussion Leader
Posts: 7739
Joined: 25 Oct 2014, 09:52
2017 Reading Goal: 52
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 50
Favorite Book: The Lost Continent
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 322
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-bookowlie.html
Latest Review: Norman by Michelle Olson

Post by bookowlie » 30 Jun 2018, 10:04

Bonnie Shelby wrote:
30 Jun 2018, 09:54
Dael Reader wrote:
10 Jun 2018, 11:05
She probably will. But I wish she wouldn't. Not unless she does enough research to base the plot lines more solidly on art history. If Angela and Alex can start solving art mysterious with a more academic approach, rather than based on Angela's ridiculous past-life regression/spirit possession episodes, the stories could be a little bit more interesting. If she keeps basing the stories on sex scenes past and present, there will be very little to recommend about the books.
I agree. If she doesn't find a way to add some complexity to the plot, I'm not so sure the next book will be worth reading.
I actually thought the plot wasn't overly simplistic. The historical aspects were interesting, especially the parts that were rooted in fact. The sex scenes were overdone and the paranormal stuff was almost comical at times. Still, I wonder if the author will take some of the feedback here and add more traditional detective work in the next installment.
"I am not afraid of storms, for I am learning how to sail my ship" - Louisa May Alcott

User avatar
bookowlie
Special Discussion Leader
Posts: 7739
Joined: 25 Oct 2014, 09:52
2017 Reading Goal: 52
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 50
Favorite Book: The Lost Continent
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 322
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-bookowlie.html
Latest Review: Norman by Michelle Olson

Post by bookowlie » 30 Jun 2018, 10:08

Dael Reader wrote:
10 Jun 2018, 11:05
She probably will. But I wish she wouldn't. Not unless she does enough research to base the plot lines more solidly on art history. If Angela and Alex can start solving art mysterious with a more academic approach, rather than based on Angela's ridiculous past-life regression/spirit possession episodes, the stories could be a little bit more interesting. If she keeps basing the stories on sex scenes past and present, there will be very little to recommend about the books.
It's probably easier to write scenes that are fantasy-based since you are pretty much write anything. In a mystery plot, I would think it's harder to craft a realistic set of clues and traditional ways for the characters to solve the mystery.
"I am not afraid of storms, for I am learning how to sail my ship" - Louisa May Alcott

User avatar
Bonnie Shelby
Posts: 346
Joined: 12 May 2018, 20:07
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 78
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-bonnie-shelby.html
Latest Review: Apollo's Raven by Linnea Tanner
Reading Device: B00IKPYKWG

Post by Bonnie Shelby » 30 Jun 2018, 10:18

bookowlie wrote:
30 Jun 2018, 10:04
Bonnie Shelby wrote:
30 Jun 2018, 09:54
Dael Reader wrote:
10 Jun 2018, 11:05
She probably will. But I wish she wouldn't. Not unless she does enough research to base the plot lines more solidly on art history. If Angela and Alex can start solving art mysterious with a more academic approach, rather than based on Angela's ridiculous past-life regression/spirit possession episodes, the stories could be a little bit more interesting. If she keeps basing the stories on sex scenes past and present, there will be very little to recommend about the books.
I agree. If she doesn't find a way to add some complexity to the plot, I'm not so sure the next book will be worth reading.
I actually thought the plot wasn't overly simplistic. The historical aspects were interesting, especially the parts that were rooted in fact. The sex scenes were overdone and the paranormal stuff was almost comical at times. Still, I wonder if the author will take some of the feedback here and add more traditional detective work in the next installment.
True. I guess what I meant was more complexity in the mystery portion. People have been comparing this book to Dan Brown's The Davinci Code when I don't think it comes even close. Not to say that I'm hoping her next book will have that level of intricacy, but a little more work added in that regard, in addition to her historical and romantic themes could really bring her books to the next level.

User avatar
bookowlie
Special Discussion Leader
Posts: 7739
Joined: 25 Oct 2014, 09:52
2017 Reading Goal: 52
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 50
Favorite Book: The Lost Continent
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 322
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-bookowlie.html
Latest Review: Norman by Michelle Olson

Post by bookowlie » 30 Jun 2018, 10:24

Bonnie Shelby, I agree the books are not similar at all. I think this book would have benefitted would a more complex set of clues and less emphasis on the silly over-the-top stuff. Like you, I like a good, juicy mystery with a bunch of clues that I can try to solve myself. There wasn't too much suspense here - just a lot of special effects (paranormal stuff) and sexy scenes.
"I am not afraid of storms, for I am learning how to sail my ship" - Louisa May Alcott

User avatar
Dael Reader
Posts: 680
Joined: 05 May 2018, 08:39
Currently Reading: The Story of Arthur Truluv
Bookshelf Size: 53
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-dael-reader.html
Latest Review: Blues for the Father by Marcel Wilson, Joseph Harrison and Barry Kohl
Reading Device: 1400697484

Post by Dael Reader » 30 Jun 2018, 12:15

bookowlie wrote:
30 Jun 2018, 10:08
Dael Reader wrote:
10 Jun 2018, 11:05
She probably will. But I wish she wouldn't. Not unless she does enough research to base the plot lines more solidly on art history. If Angela and Alex can start solving art mysterious with a more academic approach, rather than based on Angela's ridiculous past-life regression/spirit possession episodes, the stories could be a little bit more interesting. If she keeps basing the stories on sex scenes past and present, there will be very little to recommend about the books.
It's probably easier to write scenes that are fantasy-based since you are pretty much write anything. In a mystery plot, I would think it's harder to craft a realistic set of clues and traditional ways for the characters to solve the mystery.
True. Then she should just base her stories purely on fantasy, not art history, which would require a little bit of research and thought. Writers shouldn't be lazy about details!

User avatar
Emie Cuevas
Posts: 368
Joined: 07 Aug 2017, 19:03
2018 Reading Goal: 1000
2017 Reading Goal: 150
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 2
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 34
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 112
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-emie-cuevas.html
Latest Review: Trumpism: A Cultural Psycho-Genesis by Michel Valentin
Reading Device: B00JG8GOWU

Post by Emie Cuevas » 30 Jun 2018, 12:30

As with anything, the decision to write a sequel will probably be decided by economics. If the author makes a lot of money from this book then a sequel is almost certainly guaranteed. If no copies are sold then there won't be one.

What I find distressing is when it falls somewhere in between, and it seems to be a random choice whether or not to continue the series. I have read many series that I wanted to continue but the author didn't bother because the sales weren't there. I find this sad when some of us are invested in the characters and storyline but get left high and dry.
Whether you Think you can,
or you Think you can't,
You are Right

Napoleon Hill

User avatar
bookowlie
Special Discussion Leader
Posts: 7739
Joined: 25 Oct 2014, 09:52
2017 Reading Goal: 52
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 50
Favorite Book: The Lost Continent
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 322
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-bookowlie.html
Latest Review: Norman by Michelle Olson

Post by bookowlie » 30 Jun 2018, 12:35

Actually, some of the historical info about the characters was fact-based - Fioretta and Giuliano's story, at least much of it. In historical fiction, writers always mix fact and fiction.
"I am not afraid of storms, for I am learning how to sail my ship" - Louisa May Alcott

SweetMelissaV2131
Posts: 95
Joined: 21 May 2018, 16:32
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 21
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-sweetmelissav2131.html
Latest Review: Becoming the Dragon by Alex Sapegin
Reading Device: 1400697484

Post by SweetMelissaV2131 » 30 Jun 2018, 13:56

kfwilson6 wrote:
12 Jun 2018, 19:37
SweetMelissaV2131 wrote:
11 Jun 2018, 10:38
Sushan wrote:
10 Jun 2018, 18:59
I think there is nothing for us to wonder since, amazon has revealed that this is the 1st book of a series, in the book description. :lol:
:D I do realize that now :lol2: That will teach me to post a question without reading the whole Amazon description of a book. I also wanted to see if this question would raise some opinions on whether or not the readers/reviewers here would like to see this book as the beginning of a series. It will be interesting to see how the author continues the storyline I think.
Thanks for taking the time to comment on my post. :D
Don't trust what Amazon says!!! LOL. I'm joking but how many years have we been waiting for the next Game of Thrones book?? Also Superhighway is classified as a trilogy, but I have seen no mention of a third book yet. I'm stumped as to whether or not that will actually be a trilogy. I think it was a reasonable question to ask simply based on how the book ended. I think some people may see it as an opening for a series and some may think it was just a nice way to end the book with a little intrigue.
I recently read Superhighway and loved it so much that I jumped right into reading the second one. Heck, I even signed up for Kindle Unlimited so I could read the second one right away. I do hope they do a third one but have not seen any mention of it either :(

SweetMelissaV2131
Posts: 95
Joined: 21 May 2018, 16:32
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 21
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-sweetmelissav2131.html
Latest Review: Becoming the Dragon by Alex Sapegin
Reading Device: 1400697484

Post by SweetMelissaV2131 » 30 Jun 2018, 14:00

bookowlie wrote:
13 Jun 2018, 20:11
The two past lives in this story already requires a suspension of disbelief. If Angela is going to have other past lives in Book 2, that would be mind-boggling. That's why I would have preferred she just had visions rather than past-life regression. Then it would make more sense to have visions about different people or artwork in the next books in the series.
Ah yes, good point with the difference between visions and past-life regression. Maybe she has the ability to do both? is that possible I wonder? :eusa-think:

SweetMelissaV2131
Posts: 95
Joined: 21 May 2018, 16:32
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 21
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-sweetmelissav2131.html
Latest Review: Becoming the Dragon by Alex Sapegin
Reading Device: 1400697484

Post by SweetMelissaV2131 » 30 Jun 2018, 14:10

Emie Cuevas wrote:
30 Jun 2018, 12:30
As with anything, the decision to write a sequel will probably be decided by economics. If the author makes a lot of money from this book then a sequel is almost certainly guaranteed. If no copies are sold then there won't be one.

What I find distressing is when it falls somewhere in between, and it seems to be a random choice whether or not to continue the series. I have read many series that I wanted to continue but the author didn't bother because the sales weren't there. I find this sad when some of us are invested in the characters and storyline but get left high and dry.
That always seems to be my problem, I get so invested in the characters of the books I love and when the book is over I'm like, 'Ok...I want more!! That was awesome!' but then there are no more books with this characters :(

User avatar
CinWin
Posts: 306
Joined: 29 Apr 2018, 18:42
2018 Reading Goal: 30
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 56
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 50
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-cinwin.html
Latest Review: Prayers, Affirmations and Meditations by Rev. Cindy Paulos

Post by CinWin » 30 Jun 2018, 14:24

I would say YES she plans on writing a sequel. It appears that way from the way the book ended. And if she isn't planning on writing another book about Angela and Alex, she should. It was a great read!
----"Life is like a box of chocolates. You never know what you're gonna get."----

User avatar
bookowlie
Special Discussion Leader
Posts: 7739
Joined: 25 Oct 2014, 09:52
2017 Reading Goal: 52
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 50
Favorite Book: The Lost Continent
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 322
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-bookowlie.html
Latest Review: Norman by Michelle Olson

Post by bookowlie » 30 Jun 2018, 15:52

SweetMelissaV2131 wrote:
30 Jun 2018, 14:00
bookowlie wrote:
13 Jun 2018, 20:11
The two past lives in this story already requires a suspension of disbelief. If Angela is going to have other past lives in Book 2, that would be mind-boggling. That's why I would have preferred she just had visions rather than past-life regression. Then it would make more sense to have visions about different people or artwork in the next books in the series.
Ah yes, good point with the difference between visions and past-life regression. Maybe she has the ability to do both? is that possible I wonder? :eusa-think:
I am very curious about how the author will deal with the paranormal stuff in Book 2, given the way the way this book ended. Mixing visions and past-life regression would be a bit much. It would be like saying someone is both a vampire and has psychic visions. I know writers take liberties when writing fantasy elements, but I would prefer some consistency. Of course, Angela having tons of previous lives with each successive book would also be wild!
"I am not afraid of storms, for I am learning how to sail my ship" - Louisa May Alcott

SweetMelissaV2131
Posts: 95
Joined: 21 May 2018, 16:32
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 21
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-sweetmelissav2131.html
Latest Review: Becoming the Dragon by Alex Sapegin
Reading Device: 1400697484

Post by SweetMelissaV2131 » 01 Jul 2018, 15:49

bookowlie wrote:
30 Jun 2018, 15:52
SweetMelissaV2131 wrote:
30 Jun 2018, 14:00
bookowlie wrote:
13 Jun 2018, 20:11
The two past lives in this story already requires a suspension of disbelief. If Angela is going to have other past lives in Book 2, that would be mind-boggling. That's why I would have preferred she just had visions rather than past-life regression. Then it would make more sense to have visions about different people or artwork in the next books in the series.
Ah yes, good point with the difference between visions and past-life regression. Maybe she has the ability to do both? is that possible I wonder? :eusa-think:
I am very curious about how the author will deal with the paranormal stuff in Book 2, given the way the way this book ended. Mixing visions and past-life regression would be a bit much. It would be like saying someone is both a vampire and has psychic visions. I know writers take liberties when writing fantasy elements, but I would prefer some consistency. Of course, Angela having tons of previous lives with each successive book would also be wild!
I agree! I'm looking forward to a second book!

Post Reply

Return to “Discuss "The Girl Who Knew da Vinci" by Belle Ami”