Why is da Vinci’s name on the cover?

Use this forum to discuss the June 2018 Book of the Month"The Girl Who Knew da Vinci" by Belle Ami
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lindsaysherlock
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Re: Why is da Vinci’s name on the cover?

Post by lindsaysherlock » 24 Jun 2018, 13:23

Personally, I think that using Da Vinci is more of a marketing tactic. I mean, when I see Da Vinci on a cover, it makes it look more "official" looking.

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Post by anwidmer » 24 Jun 2018, 14:26

As i begin to read the book it seems to make perfect sense. Dhe seems to "know" the artist. I cant say much more without spoilers but yes i believe a tad bit if da vincis name specifically was a marketing tool. But i wouldnt call it a tactic. That implys deceit and the name of the book isnt completely dissociated from its content like some ive seen.

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Post by kfwilson6 » 24 Jun 2018, 20:37

Tracey Madeley wrote:
19 Jun 2018, 05:04
I'm a little late picking up the book, but my first thought was Dan Brown when I saw the title. Fortunately, I'm not taken in just by the title. There is a similar problem with Jane Austen and Mr Darcy being used in book titles. I wonder if anyone else noted the author's name 'Belle Ami' is also close to Belle Andre, the NY Times and USA Today bestselling author. Could be a coincidence, but it unlikely to be her birth name.
Belle Ami means beautiful friend in French. I figured the author just thought that was a pretty name to use. I'm not familiar with Belle Andre. There are lots of "play on words" with book titles that can include the names of people or the title of someone else's book. I hardly think Belle Ami is the first to invoke this strategy.

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Post by AWANDO OGUTU » 25 Jun 2018, 11:54

That's just an attributions of the pieces of art therein to Da Vinci. Some of his works have been used in coming up with the book.

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Post by bookowlie » 25 Jun 2018, 13:14

I think it's becoming more common that authors are using catchy titles that sometimes aren't the major part of the plot. The same goes for the cover artwork. The artwork might be salacious even if the sexy parts of the story are very minor.
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Post by Lil Reads » 25 Jun 2018, 16:59

cristinaro wrote:
04 Jun 2018, 08:06
Dolor wrote:
03 Jun 2018, 20:59
Since da Vinci is a very well-known artist, it might spark as a marketing strategy but there's nothing unethical in doing so despite the fact that the author is using his name. I agree with what Dael Reader said, "The name is in the title because the "alleged" missing painting by da Vinci is a thread that holds the storylines together."
For the sake of argument, have patience with me for a second. When I read the title "The Girl Who Knew da Vinci", what do I think of? I imagine I would learn a lot of things about da Vinci, things from his personal as well as his professional life. You've already said what a famous artist da Vinci was. Besides, there are so many things we don't know about his complex personality. He expressed himself in so many domains. Does the novel rise to the level of my expectations as promised by the title? I would say no, considering it turns out to be nothing more than a romance which uses da Vinci's name and the paranormal elements to lure more readers.
I agree with you, cristinaro; the title implies the focus would be on the man himself, take place around his lifetime, or would focus on someone researching his work. da Vinci is probably an artist almost everyone knows and people could probably name several of his paintings so even people who are not art connoisseurs want to know more about him. Several people probably picked up the book for that, then got frustrated when the store moved away from him.

I might read something else before I read this one.
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Post by Leyla » 26 Jun 2018, 00:39

The use of Da Vinci's name is a great marketing strategy given his popularity. However, the fact that the book can be compared to Brown's book may be a turn off for many of Brown's readers. There is nothing unethical about it, but just may be a turnoff.

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Post by anwidmer » 26 Jun 2018, 09:48

Leyla wrote:
26 Jun 2018, 00:39
The use of Da Vinci's name is a great marketing strategy given his popularity. However, the fact that the book can be compared to Brown's book may be a turn off for many of Brown's readers. There is nothing unethical about it, but just may be a turnoff.
I agree there's nothing unethical about using his name especially when the book is based on one of his famous paintings. I'm confused as to why this is even a question

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Post by Jkhorner » 26 Jun 2018, 10:16

The question of ethics is an interesting one. I did wonder why his name was in the title as well, considering the main character is not really the girl who knew him. If the story had been primarily set in his time period with an occasional glimpse into the future investigation, then absolutely it would have worked. As it is, I think perhaps it was the best title for the story, yet more reworking could have done to the story to make his work more prominent.

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Post by anwidmer » 26 Jun 2018, 11:25

I think Da Vincis name was used more in lue of a better option. The girl who knew Fioretta or Sophia would simply not have worked, thus the author focused on the paintings owner which is a main part of the plot. Still i agree it was marketing strategy but i dont think the author can be blamed for that. Who doesnt think of marketing while naming their work?

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Post by Bookwormgirl1 » 26 Jun 2018, 11:28

I began the book expecting to learn more of da Vinci and to see how his life may have been, but I quickly realized that the story is not centered on da Vinci at all and in fact, the person da Vinci does not have much to do with the story. I do think that this title is misleading and confusing, but not that it is unethical or wrong. The author may have simply been trying to draw in readers who enjoy history and the works of da Vinci.

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Post by Cyie22love » 26 Jun 2018, 12:07

JR Mercier wrote:
06 Jun 2018, 01:33
Dolor wrote:
03 Jun 2018, 20:59
Since da Vinci is a very well-known artist, it might spark as a marketing strategy but there's nothing unethical in doing so despite the fact that the author is using his name. I agree with what Dael Reader said, "The name is in the title because the "alleged" missing painting by da Vinci is a thread that holds the storylines together."
I agree. It's not exactly clickbait but it does help the selling of the book. Unethical? I don't think so. But it is good to question these things.
it does make sense .

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Post by kfwilson6 » 26 Jun 2018, 12:28

Bookwormgirl1 wrote:
26 Jun 2018, 11:28
I began the book expecting to learn more of da Vinci and to see how his life may have been, but I quickly realized that the story is not centered on da Vinci at all and in fact, the person da Vinci does not have much to do with the story. I do think that this title is misleading and confusing, but not that it is unethical or wrong. The author may have simply been trying to draw in readers who enjoy history and the works of da Vinci.
I think the disappoint readers feel about not getting more text about da Vinci is the worst part of the title of this book. It didn't personally bother me, but I can definitely see how it was misleading, especially if someone doesn't read the book summary. I think Ami could have mitigated this issue with a few more scenes depicting the relationship between Fioretta and da Vinci.

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Post by anwidmer » 26 Jun 2018, 13:15

All the more reason to actually read a synopsis before reading a book not just judging it by a title or its cover

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Post by AnnaKathleen » 26 Jun 2018, 13:27

This could be seen as misleading and a marketing strategy. However, it can be argued that referencing the art, personality and mindset of da Vinci can be just as potent to the story as his physical appearance would have been. As someone who studied art, I always consider an artist's work to have some if not as much spirit as the actual person. In a way it offers a different perspective, I think.
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