Why is da Vinci’s name on the cover?

Use this forum to discuss the June 2018 Book of the Month"The Girl Who Knew da Vinci" by Belle Ami
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daniya__shah3
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Re: Why is da Vinci’s name on the cover?

Post by daniya__shah3 » 08 Jun 2018, 04:01

To be honest, that's the first thing that came to my mind, it could be a developed strategy to aid in the marketing of the book. However, I don't think of it as being unethical since it doesn't relate to recreation of Vinci's art, it's a narrative trying to find the missing painting.
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Post by NRoach » 08 Jun 2018, 09:18

I was flabbergasted when it dawned on me that da Vinci, personally, has nothing to do with the plot. Who is "The Girl Who Knew da Vinci", when he doesn't appear in the book?

I'm not sure I'd go so far as to call it unethical, but it does lower my opinion of the author even further than the writing already did.

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Post by bookowlie » 08 Jun 2018, 09:21

I don't like that the painter's name was used in the title. Although the missing painting was done by him, he is an extemely minor character in the story. I also feel the title is misleading. It makes the reader assume the book is about a girl who knew da Vinci. Technically, Fioretta knew him, but that part of the plot is minor. I think the author used da Vinci's name in the title to benefit from the success of Dan Brown's book. It's the same thing with the central plot of searching for a missing piece of art. Although the rest of the story is original, I don't like it when an author capitalizes on another author's success.
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Post by sanjus » 08 Jun 2018, 09:57

may be that author wanted a storyline which is mix of present day life and historical mystics in which Da Vinci code mystery is well known to many, so thats why he included
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Post by Lundemelia » 08 Jun 2018, 10:22

It's clear to see that it is a marketing strategy, his name is used to draw in prospective readers who are interested in him. Although I wouldn't say its unethical.

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Post by kfwilson6 » 08 Jun 2018, 14:23

I have to admit that my initial interest in this book was a result of the obvious attempt to make readers think about The Da Vinci Code. I really enjoyed that book and anything that claims to be "in the spirit" of something I already enjoyed is bound to capture my interest. I in no way expected Ami's writing to be the same as Brown's, but I did want to see what was meant by "in the spirit of." I don't think there is anything wrong with using da Vinci's name in the title. The first book I reviewed is called Breaking Sandcastles. That title related back to a theme of the book, but I wouldn't say that was the most relevant title possible. But it managed to make me think about it and wonder what does it mean...? Not all titles are immediately obvious or are linked to the most obvious theme, plot point, or character. The title of this book provoked interest from multiple angles. I wouldn't say it is unethical. It is clear this is not a book by Dan Brown so anyone assuming any similarity is responsible for any connection they expect that may not pan out.

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Post by pricklypurple » 08 Jun 2018, 14:26

Dael Reader wrote:
04 Jun 2018, 11:47
cristinaro wrote:
04 Jun 2018, 07:57
Dael Reader wrote:
03 Jun 2018, 10:00
I wouldn't say there's anything unethical about it. The name is in the title because the "alleged" missing painting by da Vinci is a thread that holds the storylines together.
You may be right about that, but think of the resemblance between the cover of this book and that of Dan Brown's book. Such a resemblance coupled with da Vinci's name in the title induces the idea that the two books are similar. In this case, fans of Dan Brown would be quick to check it out. I did the same only to discover they are completely different in terms of the writing style as well as character and plot development. This is the reason why I called it a potential marketing strategy and I wondered whether it was ethical or not.
Dael Reader wrote: I see what you mean now. You're right, it is reminiscent of the Dan Brown cover and very much could be a potential marketing strategy. Which does make the author seem bit sneaky. I personally would not do such a thing, but unethical is a strong term.

I thought the same thing when I saw the cover of this book. It definitely reminded me of Dan Brown's and I do not think the usage of da Vinci in the title is a coincidence. Clearly this is a marketing strategy hoping to target fans of Dan Brown's book to pick up a copy. I don't think there's anything uethical about trying to appeal to the masses though.

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Post by Lolababs94 » 09 Jun 2018, 03:37

Dolor wrote:
03 Jun 2018, 20:59
Since da Vinci is a very well-known artist, it might spark as a marketing strategy but there's nothing unethical in doing so despite the fact that the author is using his name. I agree with what Dael Reader said, "The name is in the title because the "alleged" missing painting by da Vinci is a thread that holds the storylines together."
I do agree with you. It is an obvious marketing strategy, but nothing unethical about it. Besides, the mention of da Vinci was what piqued my interest in the first place.

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Post by Jillpillbooknerd » 09 Jun 2018, 06:34

The cover of the book is very close to the cover of The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown which would trick a lot of casual readers into picking it up. I think it was a good strategy on the part of the marketing team for this book. I don't think it's unethical though. I've picked up many books because the cover looked similar to something that I liked already hoping that I would like that book too. And the book IS about a missing da Vinci so the name makes sense.

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Post by Lunastella » 09 Jun 2018, 08:03

I don´t think it´s unethical, but it´s clearly a marketing strategy to appeal to all the The Da Vinci Code fans. I actually don´t like the cover at all, I don´t think it really exploits all that this book has to offer (and it´s a very good book, in my opinion) and all of Ami´s original work and it just makes it look like another The Da Vinci Code knockoff, which is not.

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Post by its bri » 09 Jun 2018, 09:17

Although ‘clickbate’ is a growing and accepted thing I do not think it is something that should be applied to books. People take titles and book covers often into consideration while looking for a book to read and if it is portrayed as something that it is not that could be quite frustrating.

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Post by dtb » 09 Jun 2018, 15:49

All writers have to market their books if they are hoping to sell any. If Da Vinci is a part of the story, why shouldn't it be reflected in the title?

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Post by bookowlie » 10 Jun 2018, 09:38

dtb wrote:
09 Jun 2018, 15:49
All writers have to market their books if they are hoping to sell any. If Da Vinci is a part of the story, why shouldn't it be reflected in the title?
I agree writers should market their books. Still, I felt the da Vinci tie-in was a very minor part of the story. As a result, the name on the cover felt like a bait and switch. The historical elements were much less than him than about the couples in the two eras.
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Post by NRoach » 10 Jun 2018, 10:16

dtb wrote:
09 Jun 2018, 15:49
All writers have to market their books if they are hoping to sell any. If Da Vinci is a part of the story, why shouldn't it be reflected in the title?
Because it heavily implies that da Vinci will actually play a part in the book. He's basically entirely absent. It's like if JK Rowling named her famous series "Merlin and the..." he's part of the story, right? Characters mention him occasionally, after all?

This is just bad praxis on the part of the author. Titles and covers exist to attract readers that will enjoy your book; they're not bait to be spread as widely as possible. This has immediately gotten her onto my black list, and I bet a good few others feel the same way.

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Post by benmuigai » 10 Jun 2018, 11:09

since da Vinci is well known it works as a marketing strategy and also bring the characters together.

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