Why is da Vinci’s name on the cover?

Use this forum to discuss the June 2018 Book of the Month"The Girl Who Knew da Vinci" by Belle Ami
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cristinaro
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Why is da Vinci’s name on the cover?

Post by cristinaro » 03 Jun 2018, 04:12

Leonardo da Vinci is an episodic character in the novel. Considering the overabundance of fictional books using his life as a pretext, would you agree with such a marketing strategy?

Do you think that Fioretta and Giuliano’s story and the different references to Leonardo’s work are reasons enough to use his name in the title? Is it ethical or not?
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Post by Dael Reader » 03 Jun 2018, 10:00

I wouldn't say there's anything unethical about it. The name is in the title because the "alleged" missing painting by da Vinci is a thread that holds the storylines together.

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Post by Dolor » 03 Jun 2018, 20:59

Since da Vinci is a very well-known artist, it might spark as a marketing strategy but there's nothing unethical in doing so despite the fact that the author is using his name. I agree with what Dael Reader said, "The name is in the title because the "alleged" missing painting by da Vinci is a thread that holds the storylines together."

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Post by cristinaro » 04 Jun 2018, 07:57

Dael Reader wrote:
03 Jun 2018, 10:00
I wouldn't say there's anything unethical about it. The name is in the title because the "alleged" missing painting by da Vinci is a thread that holds the storylines together.
You may be right about that, but think of the resemblance between the cover of this book and that of Dan Brown's book. Such a resemblance coupled with da Vinci's name in the title induces the idea that the two books are similar. In this case, fans of Dan Brown would be quick to check it out. I did the same only to discover they are completely different in terms of the writing style as well as character and plot development. This is the reason why I called it a potential marketing strategy and I wondered whether it was ethical or not.
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Post by cristinaro » 04 Jun 2018, 08:06

Dolor wrote:
03 Jun 2018, 20:59
Since da Vinci is a very well-known artist, it might spark as a marketing strategy but there's nothing unethical in doing so despite the fact that the author is using his name. I agree with what Dael Reader said, "The name is in the title because the "alleged" missing painting by da Vinci is a thread that holds the storylines together."
For the sake of argument, have patience with me for a second. When I read the title "The Girl Who Knew da Vinci", what do I think of? I imagine I would learn a lot of things about da Vinci, things from his personal as well as his professional life. You've already said what a famous artist da Vinci was. Besides, there are so many things we don't know about his complex personality. He expressed himself in so many domains. Does the novel rise to the level of my expectations as promised by the title? I would say no, considering it turns out to be nothing more than a romance which uses da Vinci's name and the paranormal elements to lure more readers.
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Post by Dael Reader » 04 Jun 2018, 11:47

cristinaro wrote:
04 Jun 2018, 07:57
Dael Reader wrote:
03 Jun 2018, 10:00
I wouldn't say there's anything unethical about it. The name is in the title because the "alleged" missing painting by da Vinci is a thread that holds the storylines together.
You may be right about that, but think of the resemblance between the cover of this book and that of Dan Brown's book. Such a resemblance coupled with da Vinci's name in the title induces the idea that the two books are similar. In this case, fans of Dan Brown would be quick to check it out. I did the same only to discover they are completely different in terms of the writing style as well as character and plot development. This is the reason why I called it a potential marketing strategy and I wondered whether it was ethical or not.
Dael Reader wrote: I see what you mean now. You're right, it is reminiscent of the Dan Brown cover and very much could be a potential marketing strategy. Which does make the author seem bit sneaky. I personally would not do such a thing, but unethical is a strong term.

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Post by Dael Reader » 04 Jun 2018, 11:56

cristinaro wrote:
04 Jun 2018, 07:57
Dael Reader wrote:
03 Jun 2018, 10:00
I wouldn't say there's anything unethical about it. The name is in the title because the "alleged" missing painting by da Vinci is a thread that holds the storylines together.
You may be right about that, but think of the resemblance between the cover of this book and that of Dan Brown's book. Such a resemblance coupled with da Vinci's name in the title induces the idea that the two books are similar. In this case, fans of Dan Brown would be quick to check it out. I did the same only to discover they are completely different in terms of the writing style as well as character and plot development. This is the reason why I called it a potential marketing strategy and I wondered whether it was ethical or not.
"Dael Reader"user_id=732648 wrote: Also, Angela is apparently the reincarnation of Fioretta, wife of Guiliano Medici and muse of Leonardo da Vinci. Angela is "channeling" Fioretta's memories. So she is the girl who knew da Vinci. (Incidentally, I'm actually only half-way through the book, and I am not impressed with the reincarnation storyline. ) {/quote]

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Post by Miriam Molina » 04 Jun 2018, 20:11

I am sure the author wanted readers to remember Dan Brown's controversial and highly successful book. I don't know if there would be problems with copyright infringement or other laws on publishing. But I guess Belle Ami got what she wanted. Here we are comparing her book to Brown's.

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Post by Sushan » 05 Jun 2018, 05:23

I also think that the name has much marketing value than its relevance to the story. Yet, it is da vinci, the character who holds the strands of story together so, I don't think that is unethical
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Post by Mely918 » 05 Jun 2018, 17:17

I don't think there's anything unethical about using da Vinci's name for the title. I think it's simply a means to draw a prospective reader's attention since da Vinci is such a well-known painter and innovator.

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Post by alisonedgee » 05 Jun 2018, 21:15

I mean, sure it's super relevant to the plot, and that's a good excuse for the title, but I'm of a very cynical disposition and i would say it's just a marketing strategy. but not a very clever one.

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Post by starshipsaga » 05 Jun 2018, 21:19

I think this is a scenario where it can be both. As others have said, the character holds the story together, but if his name in the title also draws readers to the book or at least make them do a double take, there's nothing wrong with that either :)

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Post by Wesley Liu » 05 Jun 2018, 22:49

Although I agree that Da Vinci is part of the main cause of the overall storyline, it could have been used as a marketing strategy. Fans of Dan Brown's The Da Vinci Code (which are many) would immediately feel urged to read this book due to the similarities that seem to be connected between the two almost completely different books.

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Post by Helen_Combe » 06 Jun 2018, 00:36

Considering that I’ve seen charity shops with signs in the window saying ’please, no more Da Vinci Codes’, I’m not sure that it’s a good selling point. It might have been a bestseller, but few people hung on to it after reading it. Personally, I thought The Day Vinci Code was tripe. Brown has written much better books.
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Post by JR Mercier » 06 Jun 2018, 01:33

Dolor wrote:
03 Jun 2018, 20:59
Since da Vinci is a very well-known artist, it might spark as a marketing strategy but there's nothing unethical in doing so despite the fact that the author is using his name. I agree with what Dael Reader said, "The name is in the title because the "alleged" missing painting by da Vinci is a thread that holds the storylines together."
I agree. It's not exactly clickbait but it does help the selling of the book. Unethical? I don't think so. But it is good to question these things.
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