Fioretta – Sophia – Angela

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courage7
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Re: Fioretta – Sophia – Angela

Post by courage7 » 27 Jun 2018, 14:13

I would say that the women were emotionally strong even if one of them did face sexual harassment from Alex at work place.standing up for yourself is something you will have to do in live.

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Post by bookowlie » 27 Jun 2018, 16:29

I agree that Sophia was the strongest, although I did like the way Fioretta gave her lover's mother a series of demands regarding the baby. Considering the power of the Medici family, that took guts! Of course, when you have just given birth and are dying, it's probably easier to be assertive. :)
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Post by greenstripedgiraffe » 28 Jun 2018, 06:25

Nena_Morena wrote: ↑
20 Jun 2018, 20:26
Although I loved Fioretta I wouldn't define her "strong". I would rather attribute that word to Sophia, who didn't just challenge her family in being with a German soldier during WWII, but she also raised their child and continued the family's business alone after so many losses in her life.
I agree with your assessment of Sophia. As for the others, I don't really feel that defining strong women was the point of the novel, so there's that.
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Post by kfwilson6 » 28 Jun 2018, 20:51

Very good points. Single motherhood may be common in this decade but in the 40s and 50s I'm sure widows were expected to remarry and provide a father for their children. To greenstripedgiraffe's point, Ami may not have intended for any of her female characters to be seen as strong. Although I think she did provide some contradictory traits about Angela. I guess when she goes kissing a stranger in hazy dazy faze we shouldn't have expected too much from her.

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Post by bookowlie » 29 Jun 2018, 08:12

greenstripedgiraffe wrote: ↑
28 Jun 2018, 06:25
Nena_Morena wrote: ↑
20 Jun 2018, 20:26
Although I loved Fioretta I wouldn't define her "strong". I would rather attribute that word to Sophia, who didn't just challenge her family in being with a German soldier during WWII, but she also raised their child and continued the family's business alone after so many losses in her life.
I agree with your assessment of Sophia. As for the others, I don't really feel that defining strong women was the point of the novel, so there's that.
I agree that the women's traits were not a focus in the book. Instead, it was all about the missing painting and the past-life regressions pointing the way to finding it. In general, mysteries don't have a big focus on character traits since the mystery plot is usually the driving force instead of deep character development.
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Post by CinWin » 29 Jun 2018, 14:25

I believe all three of them are strong women who live their lives outside of the "norm". Their relationships with the men in their lives are all very equal orientated. I believe it is very important to the "time-travel" aspect of the book to have all three women be built of the same "stuff".
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Post by kfwilson6 » 29 Jun 2018, 14:29

Very true
If Sophia and Fioretta are past versions of Angela it would make sense that they would be pretty similar. It would be strange if Ami wrote them to be vastly different.

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Post by bookowlie » 29 Jun 2018, 17:41

CinWin wrote: ↑
29 Jun 2018, 14:25
I believe all three of them are strong women who live their lives outside of the "norm". Their relationships with the men in their lives are all very equal orientated. I believe it is very important to the "time-travel" aspect of the book to have all three women be built of the same "stuff".
While I agree the two women from the past lived outside the norm for their time period, Angela seemed like a traditional young woman starting out in her career. I didn't find her to be similar to Sophia or Fioretta. Angela seemed more like she needed a man (Alex) to protect and guide her.
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Post by bookowlie » 29 Jun 2018, 17:44

kfwilson6 wrote: ↑
29 Jun 2018, 14:29
Very true
If Sophia and Fioretta are past versions of Angela it would make sense that they would be pretty similar. It would be strange if Ami wrote them to be vastly different.
I'm not sure if it would matter if someone in a past life was a different type of personality. The way I look at it, the paranormal aspects of the story were pure fantasy. Angela's past life could have just as well been Joan of Arc, Queen Victoria, or a timid housewife in New Zealand. :)
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Post by kfwilson6 » 29 Jun 2018, 18:42

Guess it depends on your take on the nurture versus nature debate. Although I don't really get the whole past-life thing, so maybe that doesn't apply. I guess it's not like being someone's descendant where similar traits would be anticipated. But if she is going to fall head over heels with Alex in less than a week because of the love she had for two men in two previous lives, I would expect a lot of similarities.

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Post by Thimble » 05 Jul 2018, 17:42

I don't like the idea of a "strong" female character because that's very subjective. I think Fioretta and Sophia were better written and more independent than Angela. If Alex were less of a white knight Angela could have had more room to show her independence, but I don't know much about her since we only learn about her feelings and nothing about her capabilities as an individual.
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Post by ValBookReviews » 17 Jul 2018, 07:23

I call them different yet equal as their relationships with the men seem similar.
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