Does this remind you of The Da Vinci Code?

Use this forum to discuss the June 2018 Book of the Month"The Girl Who Knew da Vinci" by Belle Ami
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greenstripedgiraffe
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Re: Does this remind you of The Da Vinci Code?

Post by greenstripedgiraffe » 27 Jun 2018, 12:11

Belle Ami's plot is too simple to be compared to DaVinci Code. Brown's book is much more conspiracy theory leaning. Ami's book is more of a summer beach romance novel. Very light. It didn't really make me question anything - frankly, I felt it wasn't even genuinely historical.
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Post by bookowlie » 29 Jun 2018, 08:05

greenstripedgiraffe wrote:
27 Jun 2018, 12:11
Belle Ami's plot is too simple to be compared to DaVinci Code. Brown's book is much more conspiracy theory leaning. Ami's book is more of a summer beach romance novel. Very light. It didn't really make me question anything - frankly, I felt it wasn't even genuinely historical.
Since it seemed more of a light mystery/romance, I initially didn't think any of the historical info was actually factual. When it turned out that Fioretta and Giuliano had been real people in history, I was astounded. If the story had been less wacky with the paranormal stuff, I would have been less shocked about the historical tie-ins.
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Post by Sefiros2211 » 29 Jun 2018, 10:26

It reminds me more of the Mummy Returns: the female protagonist is the reincarnation of the famous "girl." It also reminds me of psychology in terms of multiple personalities. The female lead's drastic actions (and no memory of said actions) implies an entirely different persona, indicative of suppressed desires. The part of our psyche responsible for immediate gratification (the id) is balanced by the superego (selfless action). Since civilization and customs require us to be good, the id is often suppressed. In extreme cases, a person can create a persona where the id is free to express itself: much like the alternate persona that kissed the male lead. Psychology and reincarnation. Entertaining duo.

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Post by kfwilson6 » 29 Jun 2018, 10:36

bclayton13 wrote:
23 Jun 2018, 23:50
I didn't really find a similarity; I'm a huge fan of the Da Vinci Code so I feel like I would've seen one. The characters in both definitely had some art-related obstacles but that's about it. Belle Ami's book is definitely a romance, through and through. Da Vinci Code, not so much. Personally I feel that Dan Brown just uses his books to quench his nerdy need to discuss symbology, which is fine by me.
I like the comment about his nerdy need to discuss symbology. I'm totally fine by it too. I read Inferno on a flight back from Italy. I couldn't put it down. I think by the time I got home I had finished it. Brown really writes a page turner, whereas Ami's book didn't have me dying to continue. It is a lighter read especially given that the mystery doesn't unfold much until the end and the bad guys don't show up much until the end either.

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Post by kfwilson6 » 29 Jun 2018, 10:39

Sefiros2211 wrote:
29 Jun 2018, 10:26
It reminds me more of the Mummy Returns: the female protagonist is the reincarnation of the famous "girl." It also reminds me of psychology in terms of multiple personalities. The female lead's drastic actions (and no memory of said actions) implies an entirely different persona, indicative of suppressed desires. The part of our psyche responsible for immediate gratification (the id) is balanced by the superego (selfless action). Since civilization and customs require us to be good, the id is often suppressed. In extreme cases, a person can create a persona where the id is free to express itself: much like the alternate persona that kissed the male lead. Psychology and reincarnation. Entertaining duo.
What an interesting analysis. I love psychology and analyzing why people do things I think are "crazy." I think the knowledge that Angela and Alex had of their past love for each other gave them license to indulge the id and pay less attention to the superego. They were very driven by physical gratification. I didn't feel like depth to the relationship was really displayed in large part due to the very short time frame this book covers.

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Post by kfwilson6 » 29 Jun 2018, 10:43

lindsaysherlock wrote:
23 Jun 2018, 18:38
I'm glad that this topic was made because I too wanted to know if anyone saw similarities between this and the Da Vinci Code. I've wanted to read the Da Vinci Code ever since I was a kid and my mom read it for her book club!
You should read it! What are you waiting for? Just my humble opinion, get to it :)
I was drawn to this topic because on Amazon the book blurb says "in the spirit of The Da Vinci Code." I really think that needs to be removed. Someone needs to come read this forum and realize most of us don't see much similarity between the two. Genre is not enough of a link to say one book is like another. I wouldn't say they are much alike at all, especially not enough to justify that piece of the blurb. Ok go read The Da Vinci Code now 8)

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Post by Emilyflint » 29 Jun 2018, 10:43

I think that there is a far reach between these two books. I mean you are talking about religion in one book and a missing portrait in another. There are similar themes but not enough to draw a line between the two

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Post by kfwilson6 » 29 Jun 2018, 10:53

JazmynElizabeth wrote:
24 Jun 2018, 04:29
For me the titles are the only glaring similarity, but I understand why people would think otherwise.
I suppose it's hard not to compare novels to each other nowadays. There's very few original ideas left.
I agree with you. That is why this website is so wonderful because almost every day I am introduced to a book I would not have otherwise discovered. Some of them may not be unique, but they are original to me because they are storylines I've never sought out before so therefore as far as I know they are unique.

Ami's book was immediately indicated as not being unique when the Amazon blurb explicitly compared it to The Da Vinci Code. When the reader doesn't even have the opportunity to make a comparison before deciding to read the book, the author is already defined as being unoriginal.

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Post by kfwilson6 » 29 Jun 2018, 10:55

Emilyflint wrote:
29 Jun 2018, 10:43
I think that there is a far reach between these two books. I mean you are talking about religion in one book and a missing portrait in another. There are similar themes but not enough to draw a line between the two
There really don't seem to be many parallels between the storyline, character development, writing style, or overall "feel" of the book.

BTW I love your profile picture. I saw a kid walking down the hallway where I work yesterday and he had earbuds in and an open book in his hands. I admired his ability to walk down the hall while continuing to read. It must have been a good book!

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Post by bookowlie » 29 Jun 2018, 12:16

kfwilson6 wrote:
29 Jun 2018, 10:36
bclayton13 wrote:
23 Jun 2018, 23:50
I didn't really find a similarity; I'm a huge fan of the Da Vinci Code so I feel like I would've seen one. The characters in both definitely had some art-related obstacles but that's about it. Belle Ami's book is definitely a romance, through and through. Da Vinci Code, not so much. Personally I feel that Dan Brown just uses his books to quench his nerdy need to discuss symbology, which is fine by me.
I like the comment about his nerdy need to discuss symbology. I'm totally fine by it too. I read Inferno on a flight back from Italy. I couldn't put it down. I think by the time I got home I had finished it. Brown really writes a page turner, whereas Ami's book didn't have me dying to continue. It is a lighter read especially given that the mystery doesn't unfold much until the end and the bad guys don't show up much until the end either.
Symbology - that's a new term for me! I actually don't care for Dan Brown's books - the plots are sometimes too complex for my taste. The Belle Ami book is a bit light for my taste and Brown's books are too heavy. Maybe another author can write something in the middle for my preferences. :)
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Post by bookowlie » 29 Jun 2018, 12:18

Emilyflint wrote:
29 Jun 2018, 10:43
I think that there is a far reach between these two books. I mean you are talking about religion in one book and a missing portrait in another. There are similar themes but not enough to draw a line between the two
I agree. The only common threads are a painting, mystery, and a similar title. When you look at movies and songs, there are tons that contains similar wording and common subjects.
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Post by greenstripedgiraffe » 29 Jun 2018, 12:36

Sefiros2211 wrote:
29 Jun 2018, 10:26
It reminds me more of the Mummy Returns: the female protagonist is the reincarnation of the famous "girl." It also reminds me of psychology in terms of multiple personalities. The female lead's drastic actions (and no memory of said actions) implies an entirely different persona, indicative of suppressed desires. The part of our psyche responsible for immediate gratification (the id) is balanced by the superego (selfless action). Since civilization and customs require us to be good, the id is often suppressed. In extreme cases, a person can create a persona where the id is free to express itself: much like the alternate persona that kissed the male lead. Psychology and reincarnation. Entertaining duo.
I agreethat this book is more like the Mummy Returns than DaVinci Code; maybe in movie format I would like this book better than I did when reading it.
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Post by juliecsa » 29 Jun 2018, 21:39

I have never been able to get into The Da Vinci Code -- I found it confusing, and that the pace changed too often. I want to read The Girl Who Knew da Vinci, but are these books similar enough that I may also not enjoy this one?

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Post by 420waystoreachthesun » 29 Jun 2018, 23:42

I felt that there were very basic and justifiable similarities between the two texts. For the most part, this book was wonderfully unique.

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Post by kfwilson6 » 30 Jun 2018, 09:26

juliecsa wrote:
29 Jun 2018, 21:39
I have never been able to get into The Da Vinci Code -- I found it confusing, and that the pace changed too often. I want to read The Girl Who Knew da Vinci, but are these books similar enough that I may also not enjoy this one?
No, they are quite dissimilar. If you read the rest of the comments in this topic you can see how people compared them. The Girl Who Knew da Vinci is more of a light read. It is much easier to follow; there is a lot less complexity to the mystery. Actually, there is very little complexity at all. This book also has a great deal of romance and lust that are not in The Da Vinci Code. If you had trouble reading or did not enjoy reading The Da Vinci Code, don't expect to feel the same way about The Girl Who Knew da Vinci. I believe them to be vastly different. The Girl Who Knew da Vinci may be more your speed.

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