Would Duke be as memorable without his tattoos?

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Re: Would Duke be as memorable without his tattoos?

Post by bootsie0126+ » 10 May 2018, 21:10

kfwilson6 wrote:
08 May 2018, 13:23
I think his tattoos really added to the intrigue that surrounded him. They made him even more unique and "dangerous." I don't think he would have been as widely recognized without the tattoos. I do agree with CatInTheHat though that they would have such a huge impact today.
I agree that his tattoos created a mysterious air to his performance. However, I must agree to disagree regarding him not being successful without the tattoos. It is true that the tattoos were attention getters. Humans are visual creatures by nature and it not unreasonable to assume that the tattoos served a purpose of drawing people in. On the other hand, I disagree that he would not have been successful without the tattoos. His outer appearance lured the crowds in but it was his skill and talent for performing this art that kept the people coming back. No matter what attracts people, the ability to keep and increase your audience is the success of your performance.

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Post by Jax14 » 11 May 2018, 02:07

I think the tattoos add more credibility to his routines. It's like he is advertising the pain he has gone through to get the tattoos so, therefore, his sword-swallowing and escape routines are based on the "hard" man that he is and can't be tricks. He needs to look like the stereotypical circus performer and a bit of a rebel for the time. I would expect to see tattoos on him, in the same way, I would expect to see a tattoo artist with tattoos. Without them, I would doubt his genuine immersion in his craft.

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Post by Mr Justin » 11 May 2018, 06:57

Duke Reynolds would not have been memorable in the mind of his audience at the circus without the tattoos.
Believe me or not his audience thronged his shows at the circus not because they loved to watch him perform a fake act, but they were attracted to him by his tattoos.
The tattoos told a bigger story about his invisible character than his visible character.
Similarly, in today’s world people inwardly questions the character of those of whose arms or legs have tattoos.
Biblically, it’s spiritually and morally wrong to mark tattoos on the any part of one’s body.
Interestingly, in Africa, it’s also a taboo for one to mark tattoos on any part of the body.

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Post by Mildred Tabitha » 11 May 2018, 07:09

Some people would be drawn to him because of his tattoos. I liked his ability to swallow swords. Learning about his personal life and his experiences made me like the character. So I feel the tattoo is a bonus.
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Post by Mr Justin » 11 May 2018, 08:14

Duke Reynolds would not have been memorable in the mind of his audience at the circus without the tattoos.
Believe me or not his audience thronged his shows at the circus not because they loved to watch him perform a fake act, but they were attracted to him by his tattoos.
The tattoos told a bigger story about his invisible character than his visible character.
Similarly, in today’s world people inwardly questions the character of those of whose arms or legs have tattoos.
Biblically, it’s spiritually and morally wrong to mark tattoos on the any part of one’s body.
Interestingly, in Africa, it’s also a taboo for one to mark tattoos on any part of the body.

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Post by holsam_87 » 11 May 2018, 17:30

Maybe to a point, but with the tattoos we see a life story being told on his skin.
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Post by bootsie0126+ » 11 May 2018, 20:42

holsam_87 wrote:
11 May 2018, 17:30
Maybe to a point, but with the tattoos we see a life story being told on his skin.
That is true because the first tattoo Duke got on his back depicted his life traveling. As the years went by, I'm sure the tattoos told a story. However, I do not believe that people came to see him perform because of his tattoos. Sure the tattoos were aluring to some people, but the tattoos did not keep people coming back to see him. This talent as a Sword Swallower was the head liner, his tattoos were the type man.

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Post by joshfee77 » 12 May 2018, 07:37

I think Duke's tattoos were a large part of his appeal. As it says in the book, the more acts you had in your repertoire, the more money you could potentially make. His versatility, including the tattoos and fire-breathing, gave extra depth to his character.

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Post by desantismt_17 » 12 May 2018, 12:06

For me as a reader, his personality is what makes him stand out. For Duke as a performer in this fictional story, his tattoos are probably a big part of why audience members recognize him. So, I guess it just depends on the situation.
You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.

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Post by kfwilson6 » 12 May 2018, 20:52

bootsie0126+ wrote:
11 May 2018, 20:42
holsam_87 wrote:
11 May 2018, 17:30
Maybe to a point, but with the tattoos we see a life story being told on his skin.
That is true because the first tattoo Duke got on his back depicted his life traveling. As the years went by, I'm sure the tattoos told a story. However, I do not believe that people came to see him perform because of his tattoos. Sure the tattoos were aluring to some people, but the tattooxs did not keep people coming back to see him. This talent as a Sword Swallower was the head liner, his tattoos were the type man.
I don't think there was a lot of effort put forth to get audience members coming back. The circus was constantly moving so would have a new audience every night or couple of nights. I would not return to the circus in the same year. Maybe if the circus returned in subsequent years. I just can't see people attending the circus multiple times in the same season. Therefore I think it was mostly about attracting new audiences every show. So anything visual to attract attention would be important.

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Post by kfwilson6 » 12 May 2018, 20:53

joshfee77 wrote:
12 May 2018, 07:37
I think Duke's tattoos were a large part of his appeal. As it says in the book, the more acts you had in your repertoire, the more money you could potentially make. His versatility, including the tattoos and fire-breathing, gave extra depth to his character.
I this is evidenced by the woman who was tattooed from head to toe and that was all she was at the circus to do. She just showed off her tattoos and made up stories about their meaning. Duke was sort of secondary to her for that particular attraction.

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Post by llpwap » 12 May 2018, 21:57

I think the tattoos is what drew people to him. However, I think his personality and sense of humor is what made him the most memorable.

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Post by kfwilson6 » 14 May 2018, 14:19

Jax14 wrote:
11 May 2018, 02:07
I think the tattoos add more credibility to his routines. It's like he is advertising the pain he has gone through to get the tattoos so, therefore, his sword-swallowing and escape routines are based on the "hard" man that he is and can't be tricks. He needs to look like the stereotypical circus performer and a bit of a rebel for the time. I would expect to see tattoos on him, in the same way, I would expect to see a tattoo artist with tattoos. Without them, I would doubt his genuine immersion in his craft.
This is an interesting take on it. I wouldn't have thought about it in that way. They do help him to fit the expectation for his particular career path. Especially when he tries to get into other stunts!

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Post by teacherjh » 16 May 2018, 09:25

CatInTheHat wrote:
08 May 2018, 12:07
I think that during his "hey-day," his tattoos would have really stood out. They are so common now that it would be different if he were in his prime now.
That makes sense. Body art is much more accepted now, although there are still some jobs that make you cover it up.

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Post by Bookmermaid » 16 May 2018, 11:05

Duke's courage, determination and his stage personality all permit him to stand tall. His tattoos define who he is and they symbolically add to his daring, reckless persona and they make him all the more memorable.

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