strong character of a woman

Use this forum to discuss the April 2018 Book of the Month, "Ironbark Hill" by Jennie Linnane
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CheyenneR
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Re: strong character of a woman

Post by CheyenneR » 11 Apr 2018, 18:44

I think the prologue does portray a strong woman. Even though it was portraying an abusive home, I think that helped me to see her as an even stronger woman because she was able to overcome those circumstances.

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Post by mamalui » 12 Apr 2018, 06:15

n-dai che wrote:
02 Apr 2018, 03:17
Yeah, as early as adolescence she already acted as a mature lady. I heard, too many stories like here.
Me too on this one. Adolescence being a vulnerable age for most, it does shape who a person becomes in the future wether good or bad.
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Post by Dolor » 13 Apr 2018, 06:34

Bettercallyourbookie wrote:
01 Apr 2018, 09:04
I think the prologue does convey strength of character even in an unhappy home.

Consider a few things for me: does circumstance define the strength of a character? If it doesn't, what does? If it does, doesn't being resilient in the face of hardships qualify as strength?

Also, even if she wasn't a strong character in the prologue, does that really matter? One of the most compelling things for me when I read a new book is character development. The process of finding that strength and resilience will probably be a better story than her being an unchanging source of strength throughout the entire novel.

Just food for thought. :)
This is more than an awesome reply to the question. It leaves the readers thinking about the questions thrown back. 😉

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Post by KitabuKitamu » 15 Apr 2018, 03:38

I think regardless of gender hardships can bring out the best or the worst in an individual. What matters is the character of the person as depicted by the choices made in such a situation. If the daughter buckled in fear then she wouldn't defend the others and I'm sure the story would read differently. It takes courage to defend others from people far much influential and stronger. There are real-life stories of boys who do the same. Would they be equally celebrated?

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Post by Kibetious » 15 Apr 2018, 06:02

The daughter does well to protect her mum which is a way of showing that indeed the strength of a woman is portrayed. This is made more profound given that Natalie was young.
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Post by nobunkum » 17 Apr 2018, 10:53

Spirit Wandering wrote:
01 Apr 2018, 10:05
Bettercallyourbookie wrote:
01 Apr 2018, 09:04
I think the prologue does convey strength of character even in an unhappy home.

Consider a few things for me: does circumstance define the strength of a character? If it doesn't, what does? If it does, doesn't being resilient in the face of hardships qualify as strength?

Also, even if she wasn't a strong character in the prologue, does that really matter? One of the most compelling things for me when I read a new book is character development. The process of finding that strength and resilience will probably be a better story than her being an unchanging source of strength throughout the entire novel.

Just food for thought. :)
I would agree that being resilient in the face of hardship does qualify as strength. It is unfortunate but true that, for many of us, the experience of hardship is what brings maturity and growth of one's personality. I enjoy evolving character development in a novel, as it encourages the potential for us to do the same in our own lives.
I really like that and agree. We all have faults and weaknesses and as we progress in life it is hoped that we progress to. Not to be expected to be perfect at first or have perfect circumstances but to be refined in the process of life.

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Post by mtsnel006 » 17 Apr 2018, 15:08

The daughter, Natalie is a very courageous young woman and a true fighter. So I think the prologue does convey a strong character of a woman, irrespective of the woman coming from the unhappy home.
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Post by Litzy reader » 20 Apr 2018, 22:45

The strong character of Natalie was built from the abusive environment. This inspired her to protect her siblings and defend her mother. But this does not necessarily mean that, a loving and happy home develops weak character as mentioned by Aisha.

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Post by prinjeh18 » 22 Apr 2018, 17:54

The strong character of a woman is strengthened by the hard situation. I appreciate the girl's fighting spirit.

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Post by jo89220n » 22 Apr 2018, 19:04

lesler wrote:
01 Apr 2018, 15:36
I think the strength of the daughter is strengthened by the description of the unhappy home, and it contributes to her strength. She can be strong without an unhappy upbringing, but is even more so because of it.
I agree completely. The unhappy home doesn't make her less strong. If anything, she overcomes more and perseveres which makes her stronger than most. Strength and happiness don't always go hand in hand.

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Post by EMoffat » 22 Apr 2018, 21:50

I believe that the daughter shows strength through the portrayal of an unhappy home.The mother also shows her own strength in difficult circumstances - it is too easy to judge people in these situations and say they are weak

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Post by Richard Whitehead » 22 Apr 2018, 23:34

Zilelabelle wrote:
01 Apr 2018, 15:11
That depends, are you referring to the mother or the daughter? Because I think the daughter showed more fortitude and strength of character in protecting her mother.
Natalie was indeed caring

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Post by Richard Whitehead » 22 Apr 2018, 23:35

lesler wrote:
01 Apr 2018, 15:36
I think the strength of the daughter is strengthened by the description of the unhappy home, and it contributes to her strength. She can be strong without an unhappy upbringing, but is even more so because of it.
I equally agree with this

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Post by Richard Whitehead » 22 Apr 2018, 23:36

n-dai che wrote:
01 Apr 2018, 17:09
The daughter's maturity to protect her mother makes her strong.
Yeah, this is her motive.

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Post by Richard Whitehead » 22 Apr 2018, 23:38

n-dai che wrote:
01 Apr 2018, 23:18
Nathalie needs to be brave and her unhappy home pushes her to be strong enough to fight discrimination.
Necessity is indeed the mother of invention.

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