strong character of a woman

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strong character of a woman

Post by pinklover » 01 Apr 2018, 03:07

Does the prologue convey strong character of a woman when it portrays an unhappy home?
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Post by Bettercallyourbookie » 01 Apr 2018, 09:04

I think the prologue does convey strength of character even in an unhappy home.

Consider a few things for me: does circumstance define the strength of a character? If it doesn't, what does? If it does, doesn't being resilient in the face of hardships qualify as strength?

Also, even if she wasn't a strong character in the prologue, does that really matter? One of the most compelling things for me when I read a new book is character development. The process of finding that strength and resilience will probably be a better story than her being an unchanging source of strength throughout the entire novel.

Just food for thought. :)

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Post by Spirit Wandering » 01 Apr 2018, 10:05

Bettercallyourbookie wrote:
01 Apr 2018, 09:04
I think the prologue does convey strength of character even in an unhappy home.

Consider a few things for me: does circumstance define the strength of a character? If it doesn't, what does? If it does, doesn't being resilient in the face of hardships qualify as strength?

Also, even if she wasn't a strong character in the prologue, does that really matter? One of the most compelling things for me when I read a new book is character development. The process of finding that strength and resilience will probably be a better story than her being an unchanging source of strength throughout the entire novel.

Just food for thought. :)
I would agree that being resilient in the face of hardship does qualify as strength. It is unfortunate but true that, for many of us, the experience of hardship is what brings maturity and growth of one's personality. I enjoy evolving character development in a novel, as it encourages the potential for us to do the same in our own lives.
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Post by Zilelabelle » 01 Apr 2018, 15:11

That depends, are you referring to the mother or the daughter? Because I think the daughter showed more fortitude and strength of character in protecting her mother.

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Post by lesler » 01 Apr 2018, 15:36

I think the strength of the daughter is strengthened by the description of the unhappy home, and it contributes to her strength. She can be strong without an unhappy upbringing, but is even more so because of it.

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Post by n-dai che » 01 Apr 2018, 17:09

The daughter's maturity to protect her mother makes her strong.

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Post by rcarr13 » 01 Apr 2018, 21:32

I think it does. The young girl's willingness to potentially put herself in harm's way to protect someone she loves shows her strength. I also agree with what others have said about character development. Part of what makes a story compelling is seeing a character's personal growth and maturity.

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Post by FayJac » 01 Apr 2018, 22:04

I think a strong character is very evident and even necessary in an unhappy home. Strength comes from trials and even someone from a happy home is not immune to problems and character building events. It was a very interesting book, but I was saddened to see her slide into more and more lies and a romance with a married man. That does not show strong character in a good way. The good strength we see in Natalie was in defending and providing for her family and withstanding the abuse and derogatory behavior shown to her.

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Post by n-dai che » 01 Apr 2018, 23:18

Nathalie needs to be brave and her unhappy home pushes her to be strong enough to fight discrimination.

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Post by BDTheresa » 02 Apr 2018, 02:46

Natalie did convey strong character of a woman when it protrays to an unhappy home. She been 16yrs old definitely not an adult yet acted as one, trying to be there for her family, protecting them from Alex their abuse stepfather. She took on this responsibility has the eldest child. That's admirable and loveable. To face these kind of situations one need to be strong-willed.

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Post by n-dai che » 02 Apr 2018, 03:17

Yeah, as early as adolescence she already acted as a mature lady. I heard, too many stories like here.

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Post by Helen_Combe » 02 Apr 2018, 03:47

Standing up to her stepfather in order to protect her mother required great strength as he was terrifying. She only ran away after he had stopped, she stood her ground while he came towards her. Also, her resolve to protect her mother in the future shows that it wasn’t just an adrenaline filled moment.
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Post by Mjgarrison » 02 Apr 2018, 23:27

I think the daughter shows a lot of strength. She protects the other children in the house, stands up to the drunk dad and helps her mom take care of the family. As well as, helping financially by having a job and bringing in income.

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Post by Aisha I » 03 Apr 2018, 02:48

Alas! the strong character of a woman lies in an unhappy home, when a home does lack love, care and affection she gets inspired and become more determined than ever....in this she finds strength in its full force. therefore, the weak character of a woman lies only in a happy and pampered home.

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Post by cristinaro » 03 Apr 2018, 03:11

I think the author used a good strategy by introducing Natalie and her family exactly when Natalie turned 16. Any reader in this world would immediately empathize with the protagonist, would appreciate her strength and would be willing to forgive her future mistakes. The question is: will our feelings and opinion about Natalie change up to the end of the story? I'll come back with an answer once I finish reading.
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