How much responsibility falls on the NRA?

Use this forum to discuss the March 2018 Book of the Month, "Final Notice" by Van Fleisher.
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Butterflybookworm
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Re: How much responsibility falls on the NRA?

Post by Butterflybookworm » 16 Mar 2018, 23:05

I think the NRA in this novel is definitely responsible for some of the things that happened . While the idea of being able to protect yourself and your family is definitely a good one what disturbed me was the easiness for the elderly to have access to guns . In the beginning of the novel an 89 year-old man who is living in a nursing home is able to buy a gun . If that happen in the real world what kind of checks were they running about this man's stability or in this case not running .
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Post by Spirit Wandering » 17 Mar 2018, 05:58

melissy370 wrote:
04 Mar 2018, 19:03
The NRA might have some culpability in the problems. However, they were quite demonized in the book to extreme. I don't think they have that much political clout as was portrayed.
The strength of their political clout was recently demonstrated. After the Parkland shooting, President Trump first said he would support stronger background checks and raising the age for buying an assault rifle from 18 to 21. After meeting with the NRA, he back pedaled on both those positions. The NRA has the immense political influence that it does because there has not been a compelling opposition force. The teenagers marching across the country right now are a compelling force but only time will tell if they can remain a cohesive one.
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Post by Katherine Smith » 17 Mar 2018, 12:37

I think that the NRA has some responsibility for mass shootings. The only reason why they oppose common sense gun laws is because most of their members are gun manufacturers. When a mass shooting happens, typically the response is to say that people need more guns, but all this does is put more money into their pockets.
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Post by n-dai che » 18 Mar 2018, 22:26

Roggyrus wrote:
05 Mar 2018, 01:53
In my opinion, no organization or regulating body should be taken into accountability. As I have been asserting, for any shooting to take place, the individual involved must be predisposed to do the act. We have been in proximity to knives on the table, knives in the kitchen, then why is it that we did not stab anybody yet? Or why didn't the soldiers who live with guns all their lives did not go on a shooting rampage just because they have guns?
I agree with you. Everyone of us is accountable for our actions no matter what triggers it.

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Post by onixpam » 20 Mar 2018, 09:50

I do not think the NRA is responsible, the real problem is our society, our families. In many families, the children only have the television as the nanny, action movies, war movies, where the hero never gets hurt, or the bad guys escape intact, they think the life is like their movies. The parents are never present and they never really know the issues that their kids are living. In order to change the gun problems, we have to change as a society.

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Post by 420waystoreachthesun » 20 Mar 2018, 12:13

Quite frankly, most of it falls on them. The active promotion of gun usage is always a problem, and they have immense lobbying power.

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Post by GabbiV » 20 Mar 2018, 12:49

onixpam wrote:
20 Mar 2018, 09:50
I do not think the NRA is responsible, the real problem is our society, our families. In many families, the children only have the television as the nanny, action movies, war movies, where the hero never gets hurt, or the bad guys escape intact, they think the life is like their movies. The parents are never present and they never really know the issues that their kids are living. In order to change the gun problems, we have to change as a society.
Just wondering, what part do you think the NRA plays than in the whole situation? And who is at fault when the shooter is a grown adult, rather than a kid without parental supervision?

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Post by toribyers13 » 20 Mar 2018, 12:57

I think in this book the NRA is partially responsible. Their refusal to be a part of the solution makes them incredibly responsible for all the tragedies and incidents that occurred after they were made aware of the situation for sure. I agree with some of the other comments saying that VitalTech is also partially responsible.

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Post by onixpam » 20 Mar 2018, 15:29

GabbiV wrote:
20 Mar 2018, 12:49
onixpam wrote:
20 Mar 2018, 09:50
I do not think the NRA is responsible, the real problem is our society, our families. In many families, the children only have the television as the nanny, action movies, war movies, where the hero never gets hurt, or the bad guys escape intact, they think the life is like their movies. The parents are never present and they never really know the issues that their kids are living. In order to change the gun problems, we have to change as a society.
Just wondering, what part do you think the NRA plays than in the whole situation? And who is at fault when the shooter is a grown adult, rather than a kid without parental supervision?
All kids become grown adults, if those kids grew up without love, supervision, rules, and sense of humanity, they will probably become a threat.

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Post by ReyvrexQuestor Reyes » 21 Mar 2018, 09:05

The NRA is as responsible in the shooting as a pesticide regulatory board is when there is a poisoning incident due to the misuse of the pesticides, or the rangers when someone gets lost in the park.
"In the beginning was the word.........John 1:1"

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Post by GabbiV » 21 Mar 2018, 09:08

onixpam wrote:
20 Mar 2018, 15:29
GabbiV wrote:
20 Mar 2018, 12:49
onixpam wrote:
20 Mar 2018, 09:50
I do not think the NRA is responsible, the real problem is our society, our families. In many families, the children only have the television as the nanny, action movies, war movies, where the hero never gets hurt, or the bad guys escape intact, they think the life is like their movies. The parents are never present and they never really know the issues that their kids are living. In order to change the gun problems, we have to change as a society.
Just wondering, what part do you think the NRA plays than in the whole situation? And who is at fault when the shooter is a grown adult, rather than a kid without parental supervision?
All kids become grown adults, if those kids grew up without love, supervision, rules, and sense of humanity, they will probably become a threat.
But there are so many others that grew up in those poor conditions that don't become a threat. I would actually say that becoming a threat is the less likely option because I believe more people grow up to be neutral agents or try to give more love than what they received.

And your thoughts on the NRA?

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Post by GabbiV » 21 Mar 2018, 09:10

ReyvrexQuestor Reyes wrote:
21 Mar 2018, 09:05
The NRA is as responsible in the shooting as a pesticide regulatory board is when there is a poisoning incident due to the misuse of the pesticides, or the rangers when someone gets lost in the park.
I'm confused on the ranger analogy since they don't provide the forest, but are rather used as a preventative measure.

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Post by Nena_Morena » 21 Mar 2018, 22:10

I believe the NRA and VitalTech were equally responsible for the tragedic events that happened in the book. They were both too focused on selling their products, that they didn't do anything to prevent the killings. I think the author was unbalanced in the way that he portrays them and I didn't really like his "plan" at the end of the book.

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Post by ReyvrexQuestor Reyes » 21 Mar 2018, 22:59

GabbiV wrote:
21 Mar 2018, 09:10
ReyvrexQuestor Reyes wrote:
21 Mar 2018, 09:05
The NRA is as responsible in the shooting as a pesticide regulatory board is when there is a poisoning incident due to the misuse of the pesticides, or the rangers when someone gets lost in the park.
I'm confused on the ranger analogy since they don't provide the forest, but are rather used as a preventative measure.
Yes, I used the "ranger analogy" because they are whom we rely upon to be recovered from our unfortunate wanderings. Their job is advisory or preventative, parallel to that of the promotions of the NRA. The rangers don't provide the forest; the NRA doesn't provide the guns, everyone has to provide for himself by buying.

Thanks for pointing out, I missed some explanation.
"In the beginning was the word.........John 1:1"

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Post by n-dai che » 22 Mar 2018, 05:01

420waystoreachthesun wrote:
20 Mar 2018, 12:13
Quite frankly, most of it falls on them. The active promotion of gun usage is always a problem, and they have immense lobbying power.
I agree. Because of guns, people have the rights to kill in favor of self defense.

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