How do we allow scientific innovation without ruining the world?

Use this forum to discuss the March 2018 Book of the Month, "Final Notice" by Van Fleisher.
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n-dai che
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Re: How do we allow scientific innovation without ruining the world?

Post by n-dai che » 23 Mar 2018, 22:17

Makena Mugendi wrote:
22 Mar 2018, 15:13
I believe that most new technological advancements are invented to do good, but human nature finds a way to corrupt even the best of intentions, as is seen in The Final Notice. We cannot really blame the technology for existing then, but our own free will is our demise sometimes. An example is the creation of guns which were only to be used in extreme cases, yet we have turned this weapon of destruction into a commonplace item and turned it on one another.

However, we cannot restrict advancement because of it's adverse effects, except maybe robots. All we can do is be responsible for our own little corner of the world and make the area around us as good as we can with the time that we have. We can also add as many failsafes as we can to our technology to prevent the negatives we foresee from happening.
You're right! The watch was created with good intentions, but the holder do not know how to handle his/her Final Notice in a nice way. Why is it they chose it that way? The concept of the story happens in reality either.

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Post by Felice01 » 25 Mar 2018, 08:05

I think scientific innovation will happen whether we want it to or not. People have ideas they do research and they want to know whats next. We have to hope it is out of wanting more or wanting more answers and not to do harm or hopefully to be the nect cure of something.

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Post by Zain A Blade » 25 Mar 2018, 08:50

Scientific innovation is not bad in itself, it all depends on the purpose it is used for. Just like facebook and been used to connect people and to cause divorce. The same way this instrument has been used to serve both good and bad purposes in the book. I think the message is for people to be equally conscious of the ill effects of innovation.

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Post by VictoriaMcMillen » 25 Mar 2018, 18:39

HouseOfAtticus wrote:
03 Mar 2018, 05:23
I think we must avoid excess. In a capitalistic world, it makes sense to understand what you are consuming and how much.
I like your comment. We, as a nation, as a world, must stop consuming so much and every little thing doesn't need to become the next "big" thing. It is crazy how much marketing and waste happens in our world, and how very little recycling!
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Post by VictoriaMcMillen » 25 Mar 2018, 18:42

Dr Zain A Blade wrote:
25 Mar 2018, 08:50
Scientific innovation is not bad in itself, it all depends on the purpose it is used for. Just like facebook and been used to connect people and to cause divorce. The same way this instrument has been used to serve both good and bad purposes in the book. I think the message is for people to be equally conscious of the ill effects of innovation.
Good point you share here. There will always be good and bad with all things. Those teachings go back to ancient times and no scientific marvel will ever change that. Ying and yang for example. All must be understanding and cautious of this aspect of our creation, and respect all inventions for this purpose.
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Post by VictoriaMcMillen » 25 Mar 2018, 18:46

ViziVoir wrote:
11 Mar 2018, 01:14
The answer, in my eyes, is simple: educate the populace about science.

Just look up "dihydrogen monoxide", the dangerous chemical responsible for thousands of deaths each year, which is implicated in fracking, and is a major component of drinking water. Dihydrogen monoxide, of course, is another name for water.

Scientific advancement needs a scientifically literate society to keep it in check, without hindering it. If people panic at new discoveries without understanding them, or accept all science as good and ethical, problems will undoubtedly arise.
I agree. I believe more scientific and moral ethics need to be taught in primary and secondary schools. If young minds understood the negative implications of inventions or extraction methods they would be more prepared to create safer products and methods for the future generations and keep our world healthier. In general, I wish the public was much more informed, news just isn't what it used to be.
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Post by n-dai che » 25 Mar 2018, 19:57

Dr Zain A Blade wrote:
25 Mar 2018, 08:50
Scientific innovation is not bad in itself, it all depends on the purpose it is used for. Just like facebook and been used to connect people and to cause divorce. The same way this instrument has been used to serve both good and bad purposes in the book. I think the message is for people to be equally conscious of the ill effects of innovation.
You're right! Scientific Innovation plays an important role in today's world. Because of it, some things lighten our burdens. But on the other side, it is dangerous .

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Post by britt13 » 26 Mar 2018, 14:10

I think that innovation is inevitable. I do think that in the long run it is beneficial but it definitely has consequences are well. It is funny that of all the questions posed on this forum, this one is throwing me for a loop the most. It seems like such a big concept. I guess what I am saying is I have absolutely no idea how to answer your question. I am excited to read through peoples responses after posting this to see what others think.

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Post by Tzara Drusak » 26 Mar 2018, 16:55

The right answer to this is that we allow our moral conscience to dictate the use of certain items, a no-sugar diet for example. History has proven that anything powerful in the wrong hands is quite obviously catastrophic. Yet most of us always take at least one cheat day. Being practical isn't being pessimistic; one holds truth.

The advancement of humans by way of technology is rapid and beneficial, but the creation of technologies that are harmful and preferable for its cost-cutting, 'dough-making' aspect rather than its ability to allow humans to coexist with nature is rampant.

From a logical perspective, new innovations are extremely necessary for rapid progression, as computers think at a faster rate than we do and are able to accomplish much more than us in a shorter length of time. Form a biased viewpoint however, things like AI creep me out.
And in the end, we were all just humans... Drunk on the idea that love, only love, could heal our brokenness.

-F. Scott Fitzgerald-

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Post by n-dai che » 26 Mar 2018, 19:45

Tzara Drusak wrote:
26 Mar 2018, 16:55
The right answer to this is that we allow our moral conscience to dictate the use of certain items, a no-sugar diet for example. History has proven that anything powerful in the wrong hands is quite obviously catastrophic. Yet most of us always take at least one cheat day. Being practical isn't being pessimistic; one holds truth.

The advancement of humans by way of technology is rapid and beneficial, but the creation of technologies that are harmful and preferable for its cost-cutting, 'dough-making' aspect rather than its ability to allow humans to coexist with nature is rampant.

From a logical perspective, new innovations are extremely necessary for rapid progression, as computers think at a faster rate than we do and are able to accomplish much more than us in a shorter length of time. Form a biased viewpoint however, things like AI creep me out.
"Being practical isn't being pessimistic." I agree with this. You have the point. They want gun for defense, hoping for defense only. :(

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Post by Cheyenne Perkins » 26 Mar 2018, 20:08

Spirit Wandering wrote:
02 Mar 2018, 09:28
As your post indicates, the ethical considerations about these innovations are complicated. As are the considerations about gun control. I'm one who thinks that reasonable controls are a good idea but not a complete answer. I think the only true answer comes when we can begin to develop more empathy for our fellow human beings. I think we could change the dynamics of many societal issues, including the two mentioned here, if we could begin to act from one simple, yet difficult premise: what we do to others, we do to ourselves.
I agree with you. We do need to have empathy for our fellow human beings, because that is what separates us from the animals.Technology is a wonderful thing when it works and is used for its intended purpose.

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Post by roamnoor » 27 Mar 2018, 00:00

"The human race faces one its most dangerous centuries yet as progress in science and technology becomes an ever greater threat to our existence".
-Stephen Hawking
I agree with him totally. There's a limit to what humans are able to do & innovate without causing harm. Scientific Innovation is good but it comes with a price.

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Post by kfwilson6 » 27 Mar 2018, 09:08

roamnoor wrote:
27 Mar 2018, 00:00
"The human race faces one its most dangerous centuries yet as progress in science and technology becomes an ever greater threat to our existence".
-Stephen Hawking
I agree with him totally. There's a limit to what humans are able to do & innovate without causing harm. Scientific Innovation is good but it comes with a price.
There are new risks that come with many new technologies. Obvious ones are cars, airplanes, trains (anything that can crash at high speeds). Some things are so new, no one has had time to study the effects. It's very much like any new type of drug that comes to market. My husband is constantly blown away by the side effects he hears on drug commercials, "did they just say 'may cause cancer'". In some instances, the ill effects do outweigh the benefits. Even though the ill effects may be obvious or may be available currently, do we all take the time to research and understand all of the technology we use? I read the instructions for something up until the point where I think I can use it. I certainly have never read the warning label on my hair dryer, toaster, or microwave but I'm sure there are 50 ways I could burn down the house with just those items. :shock2:

Caution and knowledge can certainly mitigate risks but to what extent do we act cautiously and with as much knowledge as is currently available? How many times do we throw caution to the wind (oh I just need to send this one text while I drive 80mph on the interstate, no big deal)!!! We know the risks, we see the consequences of taking those risks, but even that doesn't always lead to cautious living.

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Post by kfwilson6 » 27 Mar 2018, 09:12

Tzara Drusak wrote:
26 Mar 2018, 16:55
The advancement of humans by way of technology is rapid and beneficial, but the creation of technologies that are harmful and preferable for its cost-cutting, 'dough-making' aspect rather than its ability to allow humans to coexist with nature is rampant.
This is such a tragic byproduct of advancement. We, society, lets it happen. We not only destroy our environment, the environment our future generations will have to live in, but we take advantage of people. People are worked 16 hour days and not even paid enough to feed their families, all because it saves someone money to do that. Because they can get away with it.

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Post by n-dai che » 27 Mar 2018, 09:52

roamnoor wrote:
27 Mar 2018, 00:00
"The human race faces one its most dangerous centuries yet as progress in science and technology becomes an ever greater threat to our existence".
-Stephen Hawking
I agree with him totally. There's a limit to what humans are able to do & innovate without causing harm. Scientific Innovation is good but it comes with a price.
Yeah, scientific innovation makes our lives comfortable, yet sometimes it needs someone to sacrifice.

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