The Final Notice Option

Use this forum to discuss the March 2018 Book of the Month, "Final Notice" by Van Fleisher.
Post Reply
User avatar
britt13
Posts: 334
Joined: 04 Nov 2017, 21:19
2018 Reading Goal: 24
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 79
Currently Reading: Into Thin Air
Bookshelf Size: 98
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-britt13.html
Latest Review: The healing process by cassandra wade
Location: New York City

Re: The Final Notice Option

Post by britt13 » 31 Mar 2018, 19:28

kfwilson6 wrote:
28 Mar 2018, 11:31
britt13 wrote:
27 Mar 2018, 16:43
briellejee wrote:
05 Mar 2018, 09:13
I think I would want that to prepare myself and my loved ones. Also, such an option could lessen the anxiety of the user. But who would really want to be reminded that they only have, three of five days to live? and on their freaking watch?
I recently watched the new season of Black Mirror and it has an episode that made me think like your comment. It works with these little things that match you with someone and then tell you how long you will be with that person before you break up. It caused people to check out of the relationship because they knew it was ending. That is the way I feel about the watch for me personally. I feel like I would just get depressed it was ending and want it to happen right away then instead of dragging out for 30 days (or whatever I chose).
I saw that too. Knowledge in advance of an event can cause a self-fulfilling prophecy (Oedipus Rex anyone?). If you are simply told you have 10 days to live, you may take that to me no treatment can extend that period or cure you completely of whatever is causing the alert. VitalTech never really did give a good explanation of how definitive the Final Notice option was. It sounded like "you will die no matter what you do" but if tech is so good it can tell you you are dying, then it's also pretty advanced in terms of curing what ails you.
Yes! That is something about the story that I thought was a bit underdeveloped. I wanted to know more about the watch. I know that it is not real, and that may have been why he steered clear of that (to keep the feeling that this is in current, or almost current society), but I felt that it really could have added some interesting facets to the story. When I first read about the book I thought it was going to be a bit more futuristic with more focus on the watch. I think that was part of why I was pretty disappointed. On another note, I absolutely love your insights!

User avatar
britt13
Posts: 334
Joined: 04 Nov 2017, 21:19
2018 Reading Goal: 24
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 79
Currently Reading: Into Thin Air
Bookshelf Size: 98
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-britt13.html
Latest Review: The healing process by cassandra wade
Location: New York City

Post by britt13 » 31 Mar 2018, 19:31

KRay93 wrote:
31 Mar 2018, 10:12
I think that including the option of the "Final Notice" was somewhat hasty and irresponsible. They should have taken into account a psychological study of the possible reactions of patients, especially if they receive the news in a cold and distant manner, without being accompanied by professionals or relatives. As discussed in the book, they should have lowered the "tone" of the concept, to treat it more as a warning or a recommendation.
So you think it would have been okay if they had done more research into how people would react to it? I also think it needed more psychological basis, to others I have talked about how to be in the study I think people would have to agree to be in therapy. The problem with that model though is that I do not think it is sustainable past the testing phase, and I do not think that people should have the watch without being closely monitored.

Bettercallyourbookie
Posts: 51
Joined: 02 Mar 2018, 03:24
2018 Reading Goal: 12
2017 Reading Goal: 0
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 158
Currently Reading: Apollo's Raven
Bookshelf Size: 25
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-bettercallyourbookie.html
Latest Review: The Girl Who Knew Da Vinci by Belle Ami

Post by Bettercallyourbookie » 31 Mar 2018, 20:32

I really wouldn't want to know the day I'm going to die. I think it would just create a lot of feelings of anxiety surrounding the issue, and knowing doesn't necessarily ease that anxiety. We all know that we're inevitably going to die, but wearing it on your wrist keeps it more present, which would make me uncomfy.

User avatar
n-dai che
Posts: 247
Joined: 13 Sep 2017, 20:41
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 20
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-n-dai-che.html
Latest Review: Sigfried’s Smelly Socks! by Len Foley

Post by n-dai che » 01 Apr 2018, 02:00

Bettercallyourbookie wrote:
31 Mar 2018, 20:32
I really wouldn't want to know the day I'm going to die. I think it would just create a lot of feelings of anxiety surrounding the issue, and knowing doesn't necessarily ease that anxiety. We all know that we're inevitably going to die, but wearing it on your wrist keeps it more present, which would make me uncomfy.
I agree with you. I guess, If i wear it, my mind will keep on telling me "your final notice is arriving soon!" because I know the functions of the watch. It will not make me comfortable ether.

User avatar
KRay93
Posts: 205
Joined: 01 Mar 2018, 09:49
2018 Reading Goal: 0
2017 Reading Goal: 0
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 0
Currently Reading: The Reel Sisters
Bookshelf Size: 79
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-kray93.html
Latest Review: My God My Country My Son by Peter Ford

Post by KRay93 » 01 Apr 2018, 09:48

britt13 wrote:
31 Mar 2018, 19:31
KRay93 wrote:
31 Mar 2018, 10:12
I think that including the option of the "Final Notice" was somewhat hasty and irresponsible. They should have taken into account a psychological study of the possible reactions of patients, especially if they receive the news in a cold and distant manner, without being accompanied by professionals or relatives. As discussed in the book, they should have lowered the "tone" of the concept, to treat it more as a warning or a recommendation.
So you think it would have been okay if they had done more research into how people would react to it? I also think it needed more psychological basis, to others I have talked about how to be in the study I think people would have to agree to be in therapy. The problem with that model though is that I do not think it is sustainable past the testing phase, and I do not think that people should have the watch without being closely monitored.
Actually, I didn't mean to say that it would be fine if they had done those studies. What I wanted to say, is that if those studies have been carried out, they would have had a better basis to decide what to do about it. Hell, maybe the results would have been enough for them to decide not to include the "Final Notice" in the first place...

User avatar
n-dai che
Posts: 247
Joined: 13 Sep 2017, 20:41
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 20
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-n-dai-che.html
Latest Review: Sigfried’s Smelly Socks! by Len Foley

Post by n-dai che » 01 Apr 2018, 12:48

They studied it and know already the pros and cons, yet the testing phase involves both the young and old to see what would be the result.

User avatar
britt13
Posts: 334
Joined: 04 Nov 2017, 21:19
2018 Reading Goal: 24
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 79
Currently Reading: Into Thin Air
Bookshelf Size: 98
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-britt13.html
Latest Review: The healing process by cassandra wade
Location: New York City

Post by britt13 » 01 Apr 2018, 17:27

n-dai che wrote:
01 Apr 2018, 12:48
They studied it and know already the pros and cons, yet the testing phase involves both the young and old to see what would be the result.
Well yeah, after they started with just the older. I think it would have behooved them to start with a larger range to begin with.

User avatar
n-dai che
Posts: 247
Joined: 13 Sep 2017, 20:41
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 20
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-n-dai-che.html
Latest Review: Sigfried’s Smelly Socks! by Len Foley

Post by n-dai che » 01 Apr 2018, 20:33

In the research field where I am involved, the client will still pursue even if 90% have a negative comment. It is related in the vt2 company. I observed this situation many times.

User avatar
bootsie0126+
Posts: 202
Joined: 11 Mar 2018, 19:36
2018 Reading Goal: 100
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 148
Currently Reading: 4 Shots
Bookshelf Size: 263
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-bootsie0126.html
Latest Review: Toni the Superhero by R.D. Base
Reading Device: B01GEW27DA
Location: Ohio

Post by bootsie0126+ » 02 Apr 2018, 22:46

I would not like to know. It is a given fact that we are born to die. It is something that we can't get around. The fear of dying used to be a big concern for me, but once I accepted God into my life, I know that my time on earth will not be my final resting spot. With that being said, I still could not live my life to the fullest worrying about the moment I will take my last breath. The advancement of technology in the field of medicine has done some wonderful things, but I modern technology has allowed doctors, researcher and scientists to play God.

User avatar
CambaReviewer
Posts: 362
Joined: 29 Apr 2017, 05:44
2018 Reading Goal: 100
2017 Reading Goal: 50
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 16
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 32
Favorite Book: The Barnyard Buddies STOP for Peace
Currently Reading: Lord I Surrender
Bookshelf Size: 337
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-cambareviewer.html
Latest Review: Unanticipated Life by YM Johnson
Location: Earth

Post by CambaReviewer » 03 Apr 2018, 12:00

I would not want this option for my own sports watch. No, thank you!
I do not feel it was wrong to include the Final Notice option in the original test group for this watch. it added to the plot's intrigue, but then, thankfully, this is fiction!

User avatar
dtb
Posts: 250
Joined: 08 Feb 2018, 15:33
2018 Reading Goal: 30
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 70
Currently Reading: A Darker Shade of Magic
Bookshelf Size: 34
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-dtb.html
Latest Review: The Wizard of Tut Tut Bun by John McCarrick
Reading Device: B00JG8GOWU

Post by dtb » 04 Apr 2018, 07:48

I doubt I would trust the functionality enough to opt in to that option.

User avatar
BriennaiJ
Posts: 227
Joined: 15 Apr 2017, 12:02
Currently Reading: Island Games
Bookshelf Size: 31
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-briennaij.html
Latest Review: Strutting and Fretting by Kevin McKeon

Post by BriennaiJ » 04 Apr 2018, 15:57

dtb wrote:
04 Apr 2018, 07:48
I doubt I would trust the functionality enough to opt in to that option.
That's a good point. I would hate for the system to malfunction and tell me that I am going to die even though I am going to be perfectly fine for quite a while longer.

Star88
Posts: 181
Joined: 01 Aug 2017, 19:37
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 27
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-star88.html
Latest Review: And Then I Met Margaret by Rob White

Post by Star88 » 08 Apr 2018, 12:41

It is tempting to know when you will die, but I think it could lead to a lot of mental trauma. Plus, what if hackers were able to access that information? Would you be exploited or discriminated against for how long you might live?

User avatar
Sketches_by_Shell
Posts: 46
Joined: 09 Mar 2018, 09:57
2018 Reading Goal: 35
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 25
Favorite Book: Sketches by Boz
Currently Reading: The Druids
Bookshelf Size: 235
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-sketches-by-shell.html
Latest Review: Something About Ann by J. Everett Prewitt
Reading Device: B00L89V1AA
Location: America

Post by Sketches_by_Shell » 09 Apr 2018, 18:03

sepicatt wrote:
03 Mar 2018, 06:45
I would not want the option on my watch. But it is wrong to include this option period. Think about it. How do doctors discuss when results show a person has cancer, especially terminal cancer? The patient doesn't receive a phone call, they go to the office. There is protocol because of the psyche. So, to receive a message like that from a watch and not know how to process it is dangerous.
Oh yeah! Can you imagine if someone was driving down the street and took a glance at their watch to see who texted them, when WOW, the thing shows he is about to die! I would drive right off the road! Some discretion should be used in letting people know things of this matter!
"If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need." Cicero

User avatar
Sketches_by_Shell
Posts: 46
Joined: 09 Mar 2018, 09:57
2018 Reading Goal: 35
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 25
Favorite Book: Sketches by Boz
Currently Reading: The Druids
Bookshelf Size: 235
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-sketches-by-shell.html
Latest Review: Something About Ann by J. Everett Prewitt
Reading Device: B00L89V1AA
Location: America

Post by Sketches_by_Shell » 09 Apr 2018, 18:06

Star88 wrote:
08 Apr 2018, 12:41
It is tempting to know when you will die, but I think it could lead to a lot of mental trauma. Plus, what if hackers were able to access that information? Would you be exploited or discriminated against for how long you might live?
That would be real bad for the watch advocate. If someone had the watch and has already been told they are going to die in a matter of days, say his boss hacked into it and found out, what would he do? Depending upon the boss and the nature of the job, he may let the guy go; making more grief for the watch owner. Just as bad, the boss may share that information around the office, then the guy would be walking around work wondering why everyone is being so nice to him.
"If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need." Cicero

Post Reply

Return to “Discuss "Final Notice" by Van Fleisher”