Do you consider the book to be Chick Lit?

Use this forum to discuss the February 2018 Book of the Month, "The Reel Sisters" by Michelle Cummings.
Post Reply
User avatar
Kieran_Obrien
Posts: 87
Joined: 14 Jan 2018, 14:41
Currently Reading: Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl
Bookshelf Size: 10
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-kieran-obrien.html
Latest Review: The Reel Sisters by Michelle Cummings

Do you consider the book to be Chick Lit?

Post by Kieran_Obrien »

Perhaps the term is a bit offensive, but do you consider the Reel Sisters to be Chick Lit?

I think there's maybe a bit more going on in the narrative that opens up it's genre slightly, but it does hit all the chick lit tropes!

I'm a guy and I found it reasonably enjoyable anyway!

User avatar
CommMayo
Previous Member of the Month
Posts: 1635
Joined: 22 Oct 2017, 14:19
2019 Reading Goal: 20
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 135
2018 Reading Goal: 30
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 110
2017 Reading Goal: 6
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 183
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 77
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-commmayo.html
Latest Review: THREADS A Depression Era Tale by Charlotte Whitney
Reading Device: B00G2Y4WNY

Post by CommMayo »

I tried to post a version of this question and the moderators totally blocked it! I even used more fancified words and asked if it could appeal to a broader audience of males because it centers around fly fishing...

So, I guess great minds thing alike!

User avatar
Kieran_Obrien
Posts: 87
Joined: 14 Jan 2018, 14:41
Currently Reading: Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl
Bookshelf Size: 10
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-kieran-obrien.html
Latest Review: The Reel Sisters by Michelle Cummings

Post by Kieran_Obrien »

CommMayo wrote:
22 Feb 2018, 09:43
I tried to post a version of this question and the moderators totally blocked it! I even used more fancified words and asked if it could appeal to a broader audience of males because it centers around fly fishing...

So, I guess great minds thing alike!
That's odd, because I thought this book would be good to spark some discussion on the topic of chick lit. On the surface it's very chick Lit, but it's not marketed like that!

User avatar
bookowlie
Special Discussion Leader
Posts: 8395
Joined: 25 Oct 2014, 09:52
2017 Reading Goal: 52
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 50
Favorite Book: The Lost Continent
Currently Reading: The Library Book
Bookshelf Size: 367
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-bookowlie.html
Latest Review: To Paint A Murder by E. J. Gandolfo

Post by bookowlie »

I agree this book could be considered chick lit or the more modern term, "women's contemporary fiction." :) The main characters are a bunch of female friends and have girls-only get-togethers that are usually very light-hearted. I can see why an author might not want to market a book as chick lit since the genre is not usually taken seriously. Many readers look down on chick lit and don't want to read a book if it's labelled as such.
"The best way out is always through" - Robert Frost

User avatar
Katherine Smith
Posts: 956
Joined: 30 Mar 2017, 10:56
2019 Reading Goal: 60
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 61
2018 Reading Goal: 50
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 52
2017 Reading Goal: 50
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 44
Favorite Book: <a href="http://forums.onlinebookclub.org/shelve ... 524">Nancy Drew</a>
Currently Reading: The Complete Tales and Poems of Edgar Allen Poe
Bookshelf Size: 199
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-katherine-smith.html
Latest Review: "Whisky tango foxtrot...copy" by John regan
Reading Device: B01KVZV52A

Post by Katherine Smith »

I don't think that the book is a chick lit because if the main characters were all guys there would not be an issue. I like that the book is delving into the lives of four young women. I agree that the book does hit many of those themes, but every book deals with some aspects of relationships.
Latest Review: "Whisky tango foxtrot...copy" by John regan

User avatar
CatInTheHat
Previous Member of the Month
Posts: 2732
Joined: 31 May 2016, 11:53
2019 Reading Goal: 75
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 32
Favorite Book: Cry the Beloved Country
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 502
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-catinthehat.html
Latest Review: Two Wrongs by Anthony L. Baker
Reading Device: B00JG8GOWU
Publishing Contest Votes: 0

Post by CatInTheHat »

bookowlie wrote:
23 Feb 2018, 14:48
I agree this book could be considered chick lit or the more modern term, "women's contemporary fiction." :) The main characters are a bunch of female friends and have girls-only get-togethers that are usually very light-hearted. I can see why an author might not want to market a book as chick lit since the genre is not usually taken seriously. Many readers look down on chick lit and don't want to read a book if it's labelled as such.
Great points, the two genres are viewed very differently. I think "women's contemporary fiction" is a good label for the story.
Life without a good book is something the CatInTheHat cannot imagine.

User avatar
Emma13
Posts: 52
Joined: 27 Dec 2017, 11:28
2018 Reading Goal: 50
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 30
Currently Reading: The Captive Mind
Bookshelf Size: 19
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-emma13.html
Latest Review: A Slice Of Chile by Dr Terry Hannan

Post by Emma13 »

It is an interesting question. Just because the main characters in a book are male, we don't assume that only men will read it, so why do we make the opposite assumption with books about women? I guess we still have this idea that the default character is a male (probably white and straight, too).

User avatar
CommMayo
Previous Member of the Month
Posts: 1635
Joined: 22 Oct 2017, 14:19
2019 Reading Goal: 20
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 135
2018 Reading Goal: 30
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 110
2017 Reading Goal: 6
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 183
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 77
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-commmayo.html
Latest Review: THREADS A Depression Era Tale by Charlotte Whitney
Reading Device: B00G2Y4WNY

Post by CommMayo »

Emma13 wrote:
24 Feb 2018, 10:33
It is an interesting question. Just because the main characters in a book are male, we don't assume that only men will read it, so why do we make the opposite assumption with books about women? I guess we still have this idea that the default character is a male (probably white and straight, too).
Your comments are point on. At least in America, the default is white, Christian, and male. Any time a book or movie makes the focus other than that, it is labeled as other. Just look at how Wonder Woman and Black Panther have been received in the media. A chick movie and a black movie. Meanwhile, 90% of the feature films out there starring white men are just called movies.

User avatar
Sahani Nimandra
Posts: 2045
Joined: 27 Nov 2017, 22:49
2019 Reading Goal: 100
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 24
2018 Reading Goal: 100
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 100
2017 Reading Goal: 5
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 5
Favorite Book: Harry Potter and The Sorceress Stone
Currently Reading: Man of the World
Bookshelf Size: 698
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-sahani-nimandra.html
Latest Review: I once had a Farm in Ireland by Siggy Buckley
Reading Device: Huawei

Post by Sahani Nimandra »

Haha! That depends on to what length you call it a chick lit. For me, ya may be! Because the book was about four women and their time together so!
The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid! - Jane Austen :techie-studyingbrown:

User avatar
Sahani Nimandra
Posts: 2045
Joined: 27 Nov 2017, 22:49
2019 Reading Goal: 100
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 24
2018 Reading Goal: 100
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 100
2017 Reading Goal: 5
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 5
Favorite Book: Harry Potter and The Sorceress Stone
Currently Reading: Man of the World
Bookshelf Size: 698
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-sahani-nimandra.html
Latest Review: I once had a Farm in Ireland by Siggy Buckley
Reading Device: Huawei

Post by Sahani Nimandra »

Emma13 wrote:
24 Feb 2018, 10:33
It is an interesting question. Just because the main characters in a book are male, we don't assume that only men will read it, so why do we make the opposite assumption with books about women? I guess we still have this idea that the default character is a male (probably white and straight, too).
Good point!
The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid! - Jane Austen :techie-studyingbrown:

User avatar
bookowlie
Special Discussion Leader
Posts: 8395
Joined: 25 Oct 2014, 09:52
2017 Reading Goal: 52
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 50
Favorite Book: The Lost Continent
Currently Reading: The Library Book
Bookshelf Size: 367
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-bookowlie.html
Latest Review: To Paint A Murder by E. J. Gandolfo

Post by bookowlie »

bookowlie wrote:
23 Feb 2018, 14:48
I agree this book could be considered chick lit or the more modern term, "women's contemporary fiction." :) The main characters are a bunch of female friends and have girls-only get-togethers that are usually very light-hearted. I can see why an author might not want to market a book as chick lit since the genre is not usually taken seriously. Many readers look down on chick lit and don't want to read a book if it's labelled as such.
I personally can't stand the the chick lit concept. I think it's demeaning to women and makes it seem like women are not sophisticated enough to read serious subject matter. It makes me think of a fluffy beach read or a book that doesn't have too much of a plot or good writing.
"The best way out is always through" - Robert Frost

User avatar
DustinPBrown
Posts: 178
Joined: 10 Oct 2017, 15:58
Currently Reading: My Family and Other Animals
Bookshelf Size: 309
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-dustinpbrown.html
Latest Review: It's Never Water Under the Bridge by Rianne Moss

Post by DustinPBrown »

bookowlie wrote:
24 Feb 2018, 23:27
bookowlie wrote:
23 Feb 2018, 14:48
I agree this book could be considered chick lit or the more modern term, "women's contemporary fiction." :) The main characters are a bunch of female friends and have girls-only get-togethers that are usually very light-hearted. I can see why an author might not want to market a book as chick lit since the genre is not usually taken seriously. Many readers look down on chick lit and don't want to read a book if it's labelled as such.
I personally can't stand the the chick lit concept. I think it's demeaning to women and makes it seem like women are not sophisticated enough to read serious subject matter. It makes me think of a fluffy beach read or a book that doesn't have too much of a plot or good writing.
People use "chick lit" but no one uses "dude lit" or anything similar for novels by people like Tom Clancy. It's a term specifically made to belittle any book that happens to focus on the lives of women, just like "chick flick" in films.

dphelps1113
Posts: 31
Joined: 14 Jan 2018, 19:57
2018 Reading Goal: 50
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 34
Favorite Book: To Kill a Mockingbird
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 22
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-dphelps1113.html
Latest Review: Sigfried&rsquo;s Smelly Socks! by Len Foley

Post by dphelps1113 »

I am neutral to the question. I feel like anyone can relate and that it depends on the mindset of the reader.

User avatar
bookowlie
Special Discussion Leader
Posts: 8395
Joined: 25 Oct 2014, 09:52
2017 Reading Goal: 52
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 50
Favorite Book: The Lost Continent
Currently Reading: The Library Book
Bookshelf Size: 367
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-bookowlie.html
Latest Review: To Paint A Murder by E. J. Gandolfo

Post by bookowlie »

DustinPBrown, I totally agree. There is no label for fiction that has male characters or focuses on topics men might be more interested in. The chick lit label makes me feel like the publishing industry looks down on books that feature women that don't fit into a specific genre such as mystery or sci-fi.
"The best way out is always through" - Robert Frost

User avatar
Jeyasivananth
Posts: 234
Joined: 07 Jan 2018, 18:17
2018 Reading Goal: 60
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 28
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 191
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-jeyasivananth.html
Latest Review: Heartaches 3 by H.M. Irwing

Post by Jeyasivananth »

Well...that's a tricky one. I guess by defining the book as chick lit, we may be limiting the possibilities of the book.The danger of calling the book a chic lit lies in the fact that, the book at once, is implicitly recommended for only a female reading audience. However, when we look at themes raised by the book :
  • Living in close communion with Nature, helping an individual to reinvent, rediscover and rejuvenate themselves.
  • The Lessons of fish flying becoming life lessons to be learnt with patience, practiced with perseverance, and adapted to the changing currents of life.
  • The need for gender neutrality and unlearning of gender stereotypes, all appeal to humanity in general.
The loss of a child , conflict with parents , juggling family and work are problems faced by many individuals ( irrespective of male or female ) in the modern world.

Post Reply

Return to “Discuss "The Reel Sisters" by Michelle Cummings”