The Role of Fly Fishing

Use this forum to discuss the February 2018 Book of the Month, "The Reel Sisters" by Michelle Cummings.
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Kat Berg
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The Role of Fly Fishing

Post by Kat Berg »

What did you all think of the role fly fishing plays in this book? Of course, it would be a very different book if it weren't there, however, I am wondering if others like or dislike when an author goes into great detail about some activity you know almost nothing about and build a story around it? Do you love it, hate it, or does it just depend? How about with this book? Do you love, hate, or feel ambivalent about that part of the story and why?

Normally, one of my favorite things is to read a book where I learn a lot of details about something I have never known much about or done before, surrounded by a great story. An example of this is a mystery I read that revolved around glass-blowing. I read it over and over. It was a good mystery and I learned something. For me, as a vegetarian, I found myself strangely distressed to read about killing another creature as a sport. I say strangely because I have never had this kind of reluctance to read a book that described something that is otherwise largely socially accepted as a pass time.

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Post by bookowlie »

I enjoyed the fly fishing theme since it was an unusual hobby I knew nothing about. It's always nice to learn something new while reading. However, I had mixed feelings about the level of detail in the book. Although it was interesting to understand what fly fishing was all about, I thought some scenes contained too much info - for example, Amanda going on and on about making different fly ties. It made my eyes glaze over at times.
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Post by kandscreeley »

Kat Berg wrote:
02 Feb 2018, 11:43
What did you all think of the role fly fishing plays in this book? Of course, it would be a very different book if it weren't there, however, I am wondering if others like or dislike when an author goes into great detail about some activity you know almost nothing about and build a story around it? Do you love it, hate it, or does it just depend? How about with this book? Do you love, hate, or feel ambivalent about that part of the story and why?

Normally, one of my favorite things is to read a book where I learn a lot of details about something I have never known much about or done before, surrounded by a great story. An example of this is a mystery I read that revolved around glass-blowing. I read it over and over. It was a good mystery and I learned something. For me, as a vegetarian, I found myself strangely distressed to read about killing another creature as a sport. I say strangely because I have never had this kind of reluctance to read a book that described something that is otherwise largely socially accepted as a pass time.
At least in the case of the four women, though, it was catch and release. So they weren't killing the fish.

As for your other part of the question, I'm ambivalent. I'm still not really into fly fishing, but I understand why the author did what she did. It didn't spur me to take an interest in it, though.
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Post by starshipsaga »

I know nothing about fly fishing - but it is something I have always wanted to try. For such a popular pastime, I'm surprised there are not more stories based around the theme, to be honest. I don't mind when the author goes into great detail about the activity; I love learning new things, and I love it when I can feel the author's enthusiasm for the subject in every word. If it can be presented in an interesting way, I don't find it boring. That actually gets me even more interested in fly fishing, I just wish I knew more people to try it with me :)

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Post by Ndifrekedem »

This is my first time of hearing about fly fishing, I had to google it to find more or know more about this sport. That is the good thing about reading, learning new things is not bad it's helps widen your horizons. So thumps up Michelle for teaching me something new

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Post by Kat Berg »

kandscreeley wrote:
02 Feb 2018, 13:16
At least in the case of the four women, though, it was catch and release. So they weren't killing the fish.
Kandscreely, that is a good point, although many vegetarians would consider that equally bad. I think most “sport” fisherpeople practice catch and release much of the time. :)

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Post by CatInTheHat »

It was interesting to learn something new. I did not know anything about fly fishing before reading the book. I can also say, without a doubt, that I'm not likely to ever try it either. I did find it interesting to see it play such a significant role in the story, but friendship is the cornerstone of the story.
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Post by KasieMiehlke »

I liked the fly fishing aspect of this book. It fit well with the friendship aspect. Both take patience and effort with the hopes of success, but sometimesyou lose the fish and you have to try again.

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Post by Kat Berg »

starshipsaga wrote:
02 Feb 2018, 13:53
I know nothing about fly fishing - but it is something I have always wanted to try. For such a popular pastime, I'm surprised there are not more stories based around the theme, to be honest. I don't mind when the author goes into great detail about the activity; I love learning new things, and I love it when I can feel the author's enthusiasm for the subject in every word. If it can be presented in an interesting way, I don't find it boring. That actually gets me even more interested in fly fishing, I just wish I knew more people to try it with me :)
I'm actually surprised there aren't more books about it as well. I am sure there are probably quite a few specialty books, but...It is often thought of as a masculine hobby, so it is fascinating to me that the rest of the book is centered around female relationships.

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Post by starshipsaga »

Kat Berg wrote:
02 Feb 2018, 23:24
It is often thought of as a masculine hobby, so it is fascinating to me that the rest of the book is centered around female relationships.
Agreed, lots of women enjoy fly fishing too but I'm sure we just don't get to see it portrayed as often, so I also like that the author has subverted that :)

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Post by ashley_claire »

I enjoy reading books that teach me about something totally new. I agree that at times the level of detail can bog stories down, but for the most part I love learning about something I wouldn't otherwise know. I attribute reading to knowing a lot of random facts that I pull out from time to time and my husband always looks at me and asks how in the world I know that. My response is always that I read a lot :techie-studyinggray:

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Post by Kat Berg »

ashley_claire wrote:
04 Feb 2018, 08:31
I enjoy reading books that teach me about something totally new. I agree that at times the level of detail can bog stories down, but for the most part I love learning about something I wouldn't otherwise know. I attribute reading to knowing a lot of random facts that I pull out from time to time and my husband always looks at me and asks how in the world I know that. My response is always that I read a lot :techie-studyinggray:
Yes, I get that all the time! "How on earth can you possibly know that?" "Because I read."

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Post by Peterhchurch »

I have not read this book yet but I intend to. Flyfishing has long been a metaphor for friendship. It is a art that can be learned and is practiced at a slow pace. Leaving ample time for bonding with nature and whoever your fishing with. It's complicated enough to keep your mind occupied while still allowing introspection. I am really looking forward to reading it.
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Post by Rosemary Wright »

Before now, I never heard about the sport, fly fishing. Reading this book has enlightened me about this recreational activity. I like it when you learn something new from a book. It's a perfect theme.

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Post by Miriam Molina »

I read A River Runs Through It so I know a little about fly fishing, but I didn't feel like it was for women, too. And I'm supposed to be a feminist! This book set me straight.

I enjoyed the detail even if I don't think I'll ever do any fly fishing. Reading gifts you with such virtual experiences.

The message I caught from the book - friendships keep you afloat in the turbulent water that is life.

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