Did you like the "Myth I Believed" feature of the book?

Use this forum to discuss the January 2018 Book of the Month, "And Then I Met Margaret" by Rob White
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Al Chakauya
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Re: Did you like the "Myth I Believed" feature of the book?

Post by Al Chakauya » 23 Jan 2018, 08:17

I enjoyed that feature greatly. In fact that's what kept me glued to the book until the end. It actually made me relate easily with the author. It was a clever way to keep the reader intrigued by the book.

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Post by rjthegreat92 » 23 Jan 2018, 14:23

I really liked the "Myth I Believed" feature and I like how the author stated what he learned and what changed the myth. Some of the myths that changed I did not agree with or did not get that lesson part. But I still like it being incorporated.

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Post by Christina Rose » 24 Jan 2018, 00:43

This feature allowed me to read each story with perspective, even if what I gained from it in the end was different from what the author gained.

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Post by prenaramesh » 24 Jan 2018, 00:54

I liked the Myth I believed feature. It gave me a sense of what to expect from the chapter. However, what I learned from the story was sometimes different from the author. I had a small notebook where I was writing down what he learnt and what I learnt..

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Post by pinklover » 24 Jan 2018, 07:12

prenaramesh wrote:
24 Jan 2018, 00:54
I liked the Myth I believed feature. It gave me a sense of what to expect from the chapter. However, what I learned from the story was sometimes different from the author. I had a small notebook where I was writing down what he learnt and what I learnt..
Upon reading this one, I am so excited and jot down some lessons. Though I cannot relate to all the story but the life-lessons matter most to me. The way he look forward to the next step.
When everything seems too late, but it's not. God is there! Just keep on believing Jesus.

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Post by RASchneider » 25 Jan 2018, 10:32

I liked the "priming" nature of having the myths stated at the opening of the chapter. In some ways it diverts the readers eye from perceiving for herself, but the tradeoff for focusing the reader's attention may be worthwhile. It's not a horrible idea, and other authors regularly do it with snippets of verse, or epigrams, or quotes.

On the other hand, the "What I learned..." aspect almost universally disappointed me. The accurately written ones were trite, while the remainder had conclusions that seemed to be non-sequiturs. Example: A hypothetical chapter that begins "Myth I Believed: Immigrants are lazy and drain our society" should likely end with "What I learned: Immigrants are economic engines, the backbone of our society, and succeed against odds I'll never face."

Contrast that with an actual chapter, 9, in Rob's book: "The Myth I Believed: Only the few are selected to win."
What would you think would be a lesson based on that myth?
1. Actually Many are selected to win. We're all winners. Winning is a divisive illusion.
2. Many are selected to win, but only few respond and act when opportunity presents itself.
3. No one is "selected" to win. It's all luck, shaped and steered by preparation?"

The actual message, "If it's to be, it's up to me." What? That sounds like a lesson learned from, "Someone else will do it. I'm not touching that thing I wish would change." Or, "I'm sure there are great minds working on this problem, so, in spite of being interested in it, I will stay out of the way."

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Post by Christina Rose » 25 Jan 2018, 23:46

RASchneider wrote:
25 Jan 2018, 10:32
I liked the "priming" nature of having the myths stated at the opening of the chapter. In some ways it diverts the readers eye from perceiving for herself, but the tradeoff for focusing the reader's attention may be worthwhile. It's not a horrible idea, and other authors regularly do it with snippets of verse, or epigrams, or quotes.

On the other hand, the "What I learned..." aspect almost universally disappointed me. The accurately written ones were trite, while the remainder had conclusions that seemed to be non-sequiturs. Example: A hypothetical chapter that begins "Myth I Believed: Immigrants are lazy and drain our society" should likely end with "What I learned: Immigrants are economic engines, the backbone of our society, and succeed against odds I'll never face."

Contrast that with an actual chapter, 9, in Rob's book: "The Myth I Believed: Only the few are selected to win."
What would you think would be a lesson based on that myth?
1. Actually Many are selected to win. We're all winners. Winning is a divisive illusion.
2. Many are selected to win, but only few respond and act when opportunity presents itself.
3. No one is "selected" to win. It's all luck, shaped and steered by preparation?"

The actual message, "If it's to be, it's up to me." What? That sounds like a lesson learned from, "Someone else will do it. I'm not touching that thing I wish would change." Or, "I'm sure there are great minds working on this problem, so, in spite of being interested in it, I will stay out of the way."
I’d have to agree with you on this. I couldn’t quite put into words what it was about the “what I learned” aspect that I didn’t care for. But, you hit the nail on the head. Thank you for the insight.

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Post by shree_reads » 26 Jan 2018, 00:12

I really liked that feature because it helped me relate to the author. There were several instances where I thought,"Wait, how is this a myth?" and I was stunned on discovering the "truth". I think it was helpful of the author to include the meaning at the end of each chapter, so as to provide a compelling argument for his stance. There were certainly some "myths" that I interpreted differently, but it was interesting to know the author's viewpoint too.

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Post by SPasciuti » 26 Jan 2018, 00:23

rjthegreat92 wrote:
23 Jan 2018, 14:23
I really liked the "Myth I Believed" feature and I like how the author stated what he learned and what changed the myth. Some of the myths that changed I did not agree with or did not get that lesson part. But I still like it being incorporated.
prenaramesh wrote:
24 Jan 2018, 00:54
I liked the Myth I believed feature. It gave me a sense of what to expect from the chapter. However, what I learned from the story was sometimes different from the author. I had a small notebook where I was writing down what he learnt and what I learnt..
I love this. You guys both sort of said a similar thing and I wanted to ask just for my own curiosity, which ones did you feel you learned something different from? Do you mind sharing what it was? I'd love to hear. :)

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Post by Christina Rose » 26 Jan 2018, 02:18

shree_reads wrote:
26 Jan 2018, 00:12
I really liked that feature because it helped me relate to the author. There were several instances where I thought,"Wait, how is this a myth?" and I was stunned on discovering the "truth". I think it was helpful of the author to include the meaning at the end of each chapter, so as to provide a compelling argument for his stance. There were certainly some "myths" that I interpreted differently, but it was interesting to know the author's viewpoint too.
There were times when I was suprised at what the author labeled as myths, also. However, it still allowed me to read the story with perspective, which I appreciated.

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Post by pinklover » 26 Jan 2018, 05:39

BookishCreature wrote:
15 Jan 2018, 14:17
Definitely. It kept me interested and also broke the book up into bite-sized chunks. Plus it makes it easy to go back and find a specific chapter, which I think I'll end up doing quite a bit. It actually reminded me a lot of Dale Carnegie's How to Win Friends and Influence People.
I agree with what you have noticed. I want to finish reading it instantly but suddenly I cant because my eyes got swollen. Every time I continue on reading it, it make me excited. :tiphat: Too many words to ponder.
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Post by cshaffer17 » 26 Jan 2018, 12:54

I did like this feature. I felt like it kept the Chapter relevant, and you knew what to expect from it.

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Post by CNWaweru » 26 Jan 2018, 21:38

I liked it. I would prefer if he put it at the end of the chapter only.
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Post by The BookWorm Nagham » 27 Jan 2018, 14:53

I liked the way the book was organized, the title of the chapter and the myth that followed let me imagine the story and while reading i tried to guess the transformed myth, the reality Rob discovered. Even through he wrote what he learned, it didn't stop me from drawing my own conclusions.

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Post by Sahani Nimandra » 28 Jan 2018, 09:43

Actually yes, this feature enables us to know what he believed before and what experience he gained that changed his opinion and belief.
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