If you are given the chance to edit the ending of the story, how would you like it to end?

Use this forum to discuss the January 2018 Book of the Month, "And Then I Met Margaret" by Rob White
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Dolor
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If you are given the chance to edit the ending of the story, how would you like it to end?

Post by Dolor » 03 Jan 2018, 07:18

Are you satisfied with the ending of And Then I Met Margaret by Rob White? Let me hear your opinion.

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Post by fergie » 03 Jan 2018, 10:11

I think it ended on the right story, totally. But I was a bit disappointed with the last line. After this guy - a peanut seller, so not a "successful" business millionaire in the normal motivational book sense - decided to live, based on the beauty of life, the final line is: "Do you accept the fact that you’re first class?" I felt that cheapened the message. I kind of wanted the final message to be that all the striving, the success, the money etc, it's not what life's all about. That when it comes down to it, just managing to live can sometimes be the success, and finding the best in it is often what makes it worth living. That's the polar opposite of what "accepting you're first class" means to me, which is totally individualistic.

I think the book walks that line a lot. It's trying to be different and give a message about small things being important, but it's written by a motivational guru who can't quite move away himself from the idea that happiness = success = money.

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Post by lavellan » 03 Jan 2018, 10:52

fergie wrote:
03 Jan 2018, 10:11
I think it ended on the right story, totally. But I was a bit disappointed with the last line. After this guy - a peanut seller, so not a "successful" business millionaire in the normal motivational book sense - decided to live, based on the beauty of life, the final line is: "Do you accept the fact that you’re first class?" I felt that cheapened the message. I kind of wanted the final message to be that all the striving, the success, the money etc, it's not what life's all about. That when it comes down to it, just managing to live can sometimes be the success, and finding the best in it is often what makes it worth living. That's the polar opposite of what "accepting you're first class" means to me, which is totally individualistic.

I think the book walks that line a lot. It's trying to be different and give a message about small things being important, but it's written by a motivational guru who can't quite move away himself from the idea that happiness = success = money.
I agree. The book switched between measuring success as your personal growth and your wealth/status. It would have been better to end a note that emphasized the importance of being confident and happy with yourself rather than about money and other superficial things.

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Post by Gikonyo Caroline » 03 Jan 2018, 11:23

I would have loved stories on the experiences Rob had when he met the renowned world gurus. Rob has done a good job at the introduction when he briefly states the impact these gurus had on his life but I believe he didn't do their meeting and his book due justice because he barely scratches the surface with the brief introductions. I think some of these encounters should have been documented as a chapter in the book to give his work more credibility and depth in content

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Post by Quartz » 03 Jan 2018, 11:32

I did not like how he wrote in the epilogue to go to his page and "get a free pass to the front row of your life." To me, he didn't sound arrogant in the stories because he was learning lessons, but that last sentence really irked me because he did sound arrogant. Plus, he says to pay attention to unexpected "gurus" in your life, and he acts like he's trying to force himself to be an unexpected "guru."

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Post by Dolor » 03 Jan 2018, 12:30

fergie wrote:
03 Jan 2018, 10:11
I think it ended on the right story, totally. But I was a bit disappointed with the last line. After this guy - a peanut seller, so not a "successful" business millionaire in the normal motivational book sense - decided to live, based on the beauty of life, the final line is: "Do you accept the fact that you’re first class?" I felt that cheapened the message. I kind of wanted the final message to be that all the striving, the success, the money etc, it's not what life's all about. That when it comes down to it, just managing to live can sometimes be the success, and finding the best in it is often what makes it worth living. That's the polar opposite of what "accepting you're first class" means to me, which is totally individualistic.

I think the book walks that line a lot. It's trying to be different and give a message about small things being important, but it's written by a motivational guru who can't quite move away himself from the idea that happiness = success = money.
Very well said!

There's more to life than having a lot of money and in fact there are a lot of things that could make a person genuinely happy other than accumulating a lot of money.

To top it all, having too much money can't guarantee you security. Maybe you won't even sleep at the thought of your money stolen while you are asleep. ^_^

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Post by Dolor » 03 Jan 2018, 12:34

lavellan wrote:
03 Jan 2018, 10:52
fergie wrote:
03 Jan 2018, 10:11
I think it ended on the right story, totally. But I was a bit disappointed with the last line. After this guy - a peanut seller, so not a "successful" business millionaire in the normal motivational book sense - decided to live, based on the beauty of life, the final line is: "Do you accept the fact that you’re first class?" I felt that cheapened the message. I kind of wanted the final message to be that all the striving, the success, the money etc, it's not what life's all about. That when it comes down to it, just managing to live can sometimes be the success, and finding the best in it is often what makes it worth living. That's the polar opposite of what "accepting you're first class" means to me, which is totally individualistic.

I think the book walks that line a lot. It's trying to be different and give a message about small things being important, but it's written by a motivational guru who can't quite move away himself from the idea that happiness = success = money.
I agree. The book switched between measuring success as your personal growth and your wealth/status. It would have been better to end a note that emphasized the importance of being confident and happy with yourself rather than about money and other superficial things.
That's a keen observation. I would like to add the importance of contentment.

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Post by Dolor » 03 Jan 2018, 12:42

Gikonyo Caroline wrote:
03 Jan 2018, 11:23
I would have loved stories on the experiences Rob had when he met the renowned world gurus. Rob has done a good job at the introduction when he briefly states the impact these gurus had on his life but I believe he didn't do their meeting and his book due justice because he barely scratches the surface with the brief introductions. I think some of these encounters should have been documented as a chapter in the book to give his work more credibility and depth in content
You want to hear Rob's real experience meeting with renowned gurus and not just a mere mention to add to his book's credibility. Great idea!

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Post by Dolor » 03 Jan 2018, 12:47

Quartz wrote:
03 Jan 2018, 11:32
I did not like how he wrote in the epilogue to go to his page and "get a free pass to the front row of your life." To me, he didn't sound arrogant in the stories because he was learning lessons, but that last sentence really irked me because he did sound arrogant. Plus, he says to pay attention to unexpected "gurus" in your life, and he acts like he's trying to force himself to be an unexpected "guru."
Thanks for sharing what's on your mind.

It's how we digest and perceive things we wanted to think. Maybe he doesn't mean it to be "himself". It's more of a suggestion.

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Post by kandscreeley » 03 Jan 2018, 16:37

It did seem like the stories built in intensity. The last story was probably the best to end on. I don't think I would put any other story in the ending spot.
“There is no friend as loyal as a book.”
― Ernest Hemingway

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Post by Dolor » 03 Jan 2018, 18:26

kandscreeley wrote:
03 Jan 2018, 16:37
It did seem like the stories built in intensity. The last story was probably the best to end on. I don't think I would put any other story in the ending spot.
Thank you for sharing your views. Your effort is highly appreciated.

While we have different opinion regarding this matter, let's wait and read what others shall say.

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Post by Frenjie » 03 Jan 2018, 19:20

I haven't read the book yet but reading from others' comments, I agree that it's less satisfying to know that after all the author had went through in order to become the best version of himself, it's the material wealth that he puts more emphasis on as measurement of success in the end. I would probably come back to this forum to post a more precise answer to this topic after reading the book.
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Post by Sahani Nimandra » 04 Jan 2018, 01:01

Actually I would not want to change it, one reason is that it is a true story so I believe true stories should not be tampered with. Besides it ended well. Each story had something to give to the readers mind and the book is very promising. If it was a work of fiction then yes we can tell something about it but since it is a work of non fiction I rather say the author ended it well!
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Post by BookHausJ » 04 Jan 2018, 07:08

I'm over all satisfied. No need to change or suggest to end it with other scenario. It's a personal story. For me there's nothing wrong if one day many of us will share their "Rags to Riches" story. And I pray for that. I believe that God one of his mission is to Fight Poverty. He doesn't want people to have financial struggle all their life.

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Post by brian360 » 04 Jan 2018, 09:03

The ending of the story was alright because it explained how he struggled in his life and feels successful at the end.

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