Can young adults identify with the main characters?

Use this forum to discuss the December 2017 Book of the Month, End of the Last Great Kingdom by Victor Rose.
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Paul78
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Re: Can young adults identify with the main characters?

Post by Paul78 » 30 Dec 2017, 08:53

CaitlinGonya wrote:
04 Dec 2017, 19:49
I think young adults can connect with characters, especially Brimstone. As teenagers they are subject to many fits and cliches. Finding ones self and surviving bullying are milestones of life.
I would agree with you on this. Youngsters usually face alot of identity matters when they are in that stage of life. When they see how Brimstone manourvered , they would be inspired.
They would realize that even without magic one can still make it.
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Post by Miriam Molina » 01 Jan 2018, 11:47

Young adults will find the many internal struggles relatable. The need to belong and to be somebody is clearly depicted.

Heat is a good model for women, young and old. Her loyalty and courage are admirable. I just wish she had another name. Heat isn't cool, LOL!

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Post by freakkshowx » 01 Jan 2018, 19:14

Although I found the writing style to be absolutely atrocious, I began to identify with Brimstone once he became helpless after losing his leg. I'm a disabled 19-year-old female, and I lost my childhood to an excruciatingly painful disease that is still eating me alive, making me unable to walk, sit on the floor, or turn my head more than 30 degrees in either direction. Brimstone's agony in the infirmary and inability to engage in any physical activity until he discovered his bracelet's usefulness is an omnipresent reality for people like me, and, if anything, I appreciated the accurate portrayal of a disabled character.

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Post by jenjayfromSA » 02 Jan 2018, 09:48

Insecurity, needing to belong, searching for friends who have similar interests and needs, striving to find your own personal strengths and hoping to goodness you have some, these are emotions that every young adult experiences. I hope, though, they don't identify with the bloodthirsty angles, knocking off enemies wholesale.

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Post by Paul78 » 03 Jan 2018, 04:13

jenjayfromSA wrote:
02 Jan 2018, 09:48
Insecurity, needing to belong, searching for friends who have similar interests and needs, striving to find your own personal strengths and hoping to goodness you have some, these are emotions that every young adult experiences. I hope, though, they don't identify with the bloodthirsty angles,
knocking off enemies wholesale.
It all depends whether they are all alone or they have someone who can show them the way. Mentorship is key for the young adults to find the right direction for their lives.
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Post by JuliaKay » 03 Jan 2018, 10:27

I think adults would be able to identify with these characters. Heat has weaknesses and struggles, and this is the most common experience for a young adult. Overcoming these weaknesses and working to better yourself is also inspiring for young adult readers. It might also depend on the person reading the book, but I don't think young adults would be discouraged from reading this story based on the characters. :)
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Post by ButterscotchCherrie » 03 Jan 2018, 13:22

Brimstone is affected by bullying when it seems he's not good with magic; I imagine teens could relate to that. Heat was a strong character because she was tough and a competent mage. I imagine young females would appreciate that.

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Post by Lebs » 03 Jan 2018, 13:42

The inner struggles and constant pulls towards discovering who you are are prevalent in the novel and young adult s identify with this!

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Post by HouseOfAtticus » 04 Jan 2018, 08:18

I feel like Heat is a very strong character and many young adults would be able to relate to this character. I feel very similarly about Brimstone.

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Post by Kat Berg » 08 Jan 2018, 10:13

Christina Rose wrote:
03 Dec 2017, 18:54
Even though the physical struggles are acts of fantasy, I do think the inner struggles are relatable. Each main character struggles with fitting in and finding his or her own way in the world. I like that the author delves into the strengths and weaknesses of these young characters. It makes them that much more relatable.

Yes, I do feel like Heat is a strong enough character for young girls to look up to. Even though she struggles, she also rises. I think her lack of perfection makes her more relatable, and the different ways she overcomes her weaknesses show examples of attainable strength and highlight real qualities like endurance.
I agree. If the characters are perfect, then they are impossible to relate to because we will never be like them.

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Post by mumoscar » 09 Jan 2018, 03:20

The creation of the story revolves around the lives of young adults. Yes! They easily relate to most of the characters in the book.

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Post by Roggyrus » 09 Jan 2018, 03:25

It has been the norm, I think, that the audience would root for the underdog in action scenes. And the sense of justice of the readers requires that the fumbling and the naive newbie should triumph at the end. Young adults could very well pick up the hardships and torment experienced by Brimstone, to relate to their own.

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Post by Annamikov » 13 Jan 2018, 09:18

I believe that no matter what book a person readers, he will always be able to find himself in it. There's no way you cannot connect to at least one of the characters of the book - doesn't matter if he's good or evil, to put it shortly. Personally, I absolutely loved Brimstone - maybe it's because he inspired me to find inner strength and learn how to fight back.

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Post by Mouricia25 » 13 Jan 2018, 11:07

In a sense, yes, because we all have our inner demons that we have to learn to control. We also have to learn many things through trial and error, even if we have guidance from elders. There are many young people who have to face hardships every day and I believe that determination and courage are very important in overcoming most of these issues.

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Post by Ste Brad » 14 Jan 2018, 17:13

Sounds interesting. I'll have to consider it. I have to admit, though, I've been spoiled by the superb writing and true life stories of YA books by B. Sparks.

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