Can young adults identify with the main characters?

Use this forum to discuss the December 2017 Book of the Month, End of the Last Great Kingdom by Victor Rose.
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ReyvrexQuestor Reyes
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Re: Can young adults identify with the main characters?

Post by ReyvrexQuestor Reyes » 06 Dec 2017, 18:17

Young adults are still in that phase of their lives questing for discoveries. Let them discover this book, relate to it, and maybe, discover themselves in the process.
"In the beginning was the word.........John 1:1"

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Post by Katherine Smith » 07 Dec 2017, 14:13

I think that young adults could relate to Brimstone especially because of the theme of bullying. I also believe that the background of Brimstone being an orphan who is discovering himself appeals to teenagers who are trying to figure out who they are. I like that Brimstone is not a stereotypical hero. He has his flaws and his struggles which make him a more realistic character.

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Post by CommMayo » 07 Dec 2017, 22:57

It seems so sad to me that the theme of bullying is one of the biggest reasons we think young adults will identify with the main characters. Do you think they can learn better ways to handle bullying from reading this book? On the other hand, do you think that kids who are guilty of being bullies might start to see the err of their ways because of this story?

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Post by Christina Rose » 07 Dec 2017, 23:05

Katherine Smith wrote:
07 Dec 2017, 14:13
I think that young adults could relate to Brimstone especially because of the theme of bullying. I also believe that the background of Brimstone being an orphan who is discovering himself appeals to teenagers who are trying to figure out who they are. I like that Brimstone is not a stereotypical hero. He has his flaws and his struggles which make him a more realistic character.
I like that about Brimstone, as well. He’s an underdog who had to work really hard in his rise to the top.

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Post by Manali_DC » 08 Dec 2017, 00:23

I think most young adults can relate to the general themes of insecurities faced by a teenager, awkwardness in social settings, obsessing about their looks, dealing with bullying and generally finding their way into the world. So yes, I think the main characters are relatable.

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Post by Christina Rose » 08 Dec 2017, 01:28

CommMayo wrote:
07 Dec 2017, 22:57
It seems so sad to me that the theme of bullying is one of the biggest reasons we think young adults will identify with the main characters. Do you think they can learn better ways to handle bullying from reading this book? On the other hand, do you think that kids who are guilty of being bullies might start to see the err of their ways because of this story?
I agree with you. My immediate thought when considering whether or not young adults could relate, was that it is highly unfortunate that the reason I think they can isn’t a positive one. As far as whether or not a book can change the mindset of a bully, I can’t really say. I know people change over time, but unless they were already on their way to seeing the effects they have in those they bully, then I’m not convinced a book could change anything right away. It would certainly be nice if it helped, though.

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Post by Acwoolet » 08 Dec 2017, 20:49

I think that young adults would be able to relate to the characters. They are very compelling and relatable, which is very important.

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Post by ktrae910 » 09 Dec 2017, 09:01

I have a hard time putting books in the Young Adult genre. I am 50 years old this year, and when I read books categorized as YA, I find that I enjoy the stories that are well written, with good/great character development, and that don't spend the entire story emphasizing the differences between 'adults' and 'children'.

This book does that right off by placing Brimstone as Nova's apprentice. The apprentice position puts Brimstone in a category of respect, therefore Brimstone isn't expected to behave in the typically portrayed schoolboy manner. This is a teacher/student relationship that could include people of any age in either position; skill is the decision maker, not age.

As people, when we can look beyond age, we can treat others as humans based on their character and skill. This is what will make our society a better place.

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Post by CommMayo » 09 Dec 2017, 11:11

Perhaps the question should have be: Can the reader identify with the main characters?

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Post by Christina Rose » 09 Dec 2017, 17:53

Acwoolet wrote:
08 Dec 2017, 20:49
I think that young adults would be able to relate to the characters. They are very compelling and relatable, which is very important.
I agree with you on the importance of relatable characters. I usually can’t move forward with a book or series if the characters are not, in some way, relatable.

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Post by Christina Rose » 09 Dec 2017, 18:01

ktrae910 wrote:
09 Dec 2017, 09:01
I have a hard time putting books in the Young Adult genre. I am 50 years old this year, and when I read books categorized as YA, I find that I enjoy the stories that are well written, with good/great character development, and that don't spend the entire story emphasizing the differences between 'adults' and 'children'.

This book does that right off by placing Brimstone as Nova's apprentice. The apprentice position puts Brimstone in a category of respect, therefore Brimstone isn't expected to behave in the typically portrayed schoolboy manner. This is a teacher/student relationship that could include people of any age in either position; skill is the decision maker, not age.

As people, when we can look beyond age, we can treat others as humans based on their character and skill. This is what will make our society a better place.
I agree that we should look beyond age, as the manners of Brimstone and the other Crimson members do foster respect. However, I also think it’s important to remember their ages. While experiencing the mature obligations of heroic mages, these Crimson members are also dealing with the inner turmoils of their respective ages.

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Post by Amystl26 » 12 Dec 2017, 12:13

I agree with Dhwanis here... young adults are definitely drawn to stories like this! Going through that awkward stage can be, well, awkward. Having characters to relate to in stories makes a young adult not feel so alone; thus empowering them along the way. They can gather a sense of belonging and empowerment leading over into other areas of their life. Another reason (among millions!) of why books are phenomenal!

Happy reading!

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Post by Jebolina » 12 Dec 2017, 15:14

Yes I believe young adults would be able to easily relate to this. The rhetorics are their thing. Am a young adult and I relate to such in my own way.

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Post by Insightsintobooks729 » 12 Dec 2017, 15:22

I think this book has many things that young adults could relate to, chief among them bullying as well as having insecurities.
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Post by CoffeeQueen91 » 12 Dec 2017, 19:55

I mean it's kind of fantastical, so no in that sense, but if you really think about their struggles inherent of human nature..the fear, the faith, all of the other emotions that people must learn to live with, I think young adults can definitely relate, even if the scenario is different!

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