Was it too risky for Jennifer to donate blood to Jose?

Use this forum to discuss the November 2017 Book of the Month, 30th Century: Escape by Mark Kingston Levin, PhD.
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JadeK
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Re: Was it too risky for Jennifer to donate blood to Jose?

Post by JadeK » 22 Dec 2017, 15:08

I do think that what Jennifer did was risky. However, when it means saving someone else's life I think the risk is worth it. She did the right thing in the situation.

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Post by Bluecobia » 23 Dec 2017, 21:46

She knew it was a safe thing to do. No reason to not try to save a life.

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Post by ritah » 26 Dec 2017, 14:48

Anirudh Badri wrote:
17 Nov 2017, 11:52
The risk from drawing too much blood, while real, is much less of a risk to me than letting someone die when I could possibly save them. I think she made the right call since there was not a great deal of hope for Jose otherwise
I feel the same way. Letting someone die when I could have saved them from certain death, would haunt me and eventually eat me up inside.

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Post by Whitney Marchelle » 27 Dec 2017, 18:50

I think she took too much, giving some blood, that's okay. but to basically have two people on the team too weak to do anything in case of attack was not smart at all to me.

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Post by Lebs » 03 Jan 2018, 15:26

Definitely. She was the only one who was quick and thinking on her feet. However, I don't know why she gave so much- it could have adversely affected her.

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Post by micoleon13 » 04 Jan 2018, 16:08

ashley_claire wrote:
03 Nov 2017, 07:43
I agree that it was the right thing to do but the amount she was able to donate was suspicious. I also found it odd that nobody ever asked her to show them exactly how she did the test. Being that it's a group of scientists and research students, I would think that's something they would want to know just for curiosity's sake.
That's a very good point. Its so easy to just gloss over the realistic parts for the sake of fiction, such as how much she gave and not questioning her knowledge. There's some lee way with poetic license, but if readers start questioning it, you know that it went to far

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Post by jennyd2003 » 05 Jan 2018, 00:54

I think she took too big a risk. She should have taken a smaller amount and asked for help in setting up the draw. She wouldn't have risked blowing her cover as much and felt better too.

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Post by nlhartje » 10 Jan 2018, 01:06

Eh, it's so easy to say it was the right call and I would do the same.

In reality though, I think I would have been too scared to do what she did. Although I'm truly impulsive, I'm also working very hard to shed a long ingrained type A persona, and I wonder if I could do something like that in real time scenario.
“So the writer who breeds more words than he needs, is making a chore for the reader who reads.”
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Post by DustinPBrown » 11 Jan 2018, 04:15

micoleon13 wrote:
04 Jan 2018, 16:08
ashley_claire wrote:
03 Nov 2017, 07:43
I agree that it was the right thing to do but the amount she was able to donate was suspicious. I also found it odd that nobody ever asked her to show them exactly how she did the test. Being that it's a group of scientists and research students, I would think that's something they would want to know just for curiosity's sake.
That's a very good point. Its so easy to just gloss over the realistic parts for the sake of fiction, such as how much she gave and not questioning her knowledge. There's some lee way with poetic license, but if readers start questioning it, you know that it went to far
Yeah, it seemed unrealistic to me too that she should give so much without anyone really questioning it. I mean, the body only has like 6 pints of blood anyway, right? She took out half her blood and no one batted an eye? Hard to believe, and moments like these do draw the reader out of a story, which is what we don't want.

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