Live animals at home?

Discuss the May 2017 Book of the Month, Farmer Beau's Farm by Kathleen Geiger.

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Miriam Molina
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Re: Live animals at home?

Post by Miriam Molina » 26 Jul 2017, 01:02

Richard Mudd wrote:As a child I lived with animals in and around the home, dogs and cats in, budgies, rabbits and chickens outside, the last two for the table though. Whilst in the third year of Primary school I finally got a dog that I could call my own, Inky, a mongrel who was my almost constant companion, wherever I went. I was fortunate in that I had more freedom than many of my peers to wander and explore, even though this arose from what others would describe as a poor upbringing, from my perspective it was great. Unfortunately, Inky was a wanderer in his own right and would disappear for a day or two from time to time, I got used to that and didn't worry when he went off for what proved to be the last time, I never saw him again and have no idea what his fate was. To this day, some 65 years later, if I see a dog that resembles him I have to stifle a shout of his name, ridiculous I know, but there it is. Anyway, that was then, after that I never had another dog or pet of any kind, mostly by choice but also circumstances, that eventually changed. My wife and I had a truly difficult time with our second child, a daughter, who caused us endless and profound heartache for several years, in desperation I sought out something, anything that might mitigate our hurt and possibly heal some emotional wounds and I thought of Inky. I'm glad I did. We rescued a beautiful Rottweiler from a centre where her fate was, in time, sure and she (Sheba) has now been with us for the last 9 years, even emigrating from the UK with us. She has been a point of love and affection that all the family has been able to share and a bonding agent between us too. So yes, animals in the home are a very, very good thing in my view.
Thank you for sharing that very touching story. I hope Sheba will not wander away like Inky.

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Post by Kb3ck » 26 Jul 2017, 20:40

My husband and I have two cats named Nightwing and Kevin. They have helped me control my temper and not get upset so quickly. Training the cats to stay off the counter was not an easy job but we succeeded.

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Post by Kinnera » 27 Jul 2017, 23:58

We have a dog, and it's been great, but we're really afraid about losing her. :(

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Post by david morris » 28 Jul 2017, 02:38

As a child I lived with animals in and around the home, dogs and cats in, budgies, rabbits and chickens outside, the last two for the table though. Whilst in the third year of Primary school I finally got a dog that I could call my own, Inky, a mongrel who was my almost constant companion, wherever I went. I was fortunate in that I had more freedom than many of my peers to wander and explore, even though this arose from what others would describe as a poor upbringing, from my perspective it was great. Unfortunately, Inky was a wanderer in his own right and would disappear for a day or two from time to time, I got used to that and didn't worry when he went off for what proved to be the last time, I never saw him again and have no idea what his fate was. To this day, some 65 years later, if I see a dog that resembles him I have to stifle a shout of his name, ridiculous I know, but there it is. Anyway, that was then, after that I never had another dog or pet of any kind, mostly by choice but also circumstances, that eventually changed. My wife and I had a truly difficult time with our second child, a daughter, who caused us endless and profound heartache for several years, in desperation I sought out something, anything that might mitigate our hurt and possibly heal some emotional wounds and I thought of Inky. I'm glad I did. We rescued a beautiful Rottweiler from a centre where her fate was, in time, sure and she (Sheba) has now been with us for the last 9 years, even emigrating from the UK with us. She has been a point of love and affection that all the family has been able to share and a bonding agent between us too. So yes, animals in the home are a very, very good thing in my view.

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Post by riazziea » 29 Jul 2017, 15:37

I feel animals are very important, in anybody's life. I, myself, am an animal lover and rescuer. I have 2 dogs, 2 fish, a rabbit, and a horse. I personally don't have any kids but my 8yr old nephew had been introduced to all of my animals. He has been able to learn responsibility, care, and even how to be gentle with all animals. I believe that being able to care for an animal is the first step in being able to love and care for other humans. The animals are here for us and will do anything for us, why can't we do the same for them?

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Post by bookiegalke » 31 Jul 2017, 08:27

I have chicken and a dog which have taught the whole family lessons on responsibility because each takes turns to feed them
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Post by Elle Howard » 28 Aug 2017, 20:08

I have a cat that acts more like a two year old child. She was adopted at six weeks and grew up around humans. It is fun to watch her try to be like us. For example, she refuses to sleep unless she is covered by a blanket. She will literally try to spread the blanket out herself. Some people assume animals are stupid. However, they are just as clever as we are.
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Miriam Molina
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Post by Miriam Molina » 28 Aug 2017, 21:47

That must be cute. Her blancat must be made-to-order.

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Post by V_bansal2912 » 20 Sep 2017, 00:30

I was never allowed to have animals at home by my parents. Maybe that is the reason I am not able to have one even now. I am little scared..

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Miriam Molina
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Post by Miriam Molina » 20 Sep 2017, 01:44

Hi, V_bansal2912! I can relate to your fears. We have always had animals (dogs, cats, fish, chickens) at home, but I still haven't learned to cuddle them. But that doesn't mean I don't care for them. I do.

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Post by GPM » 20 Sep 2017, 04:08

We always have dogs and cats. They are entertaining, especially if they want food.
"A man learns in two ways, one by reading, and the other by association with smarter people." - Will Rogers

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Post by eelavahs-jay » 28 Sep 2017, 13:32

I don't have any children, being barely adult myself but I have two dogs and a cat. I can't exactly say that I've learnt a lot from then but in some way they've made me understand myself. I never thought of myself as very emotional or even an animal-lover, my ideal pet is still a goldfish. They don't poop all over the place or make noise.

But my oldest dog is in the last few weeks of her life and I've been sobbing since realizing. Over the years I've made the least efforts to interact with her and now I'm regretting it. I don't want her to go out thinking I resented her or anything

So I guess what I'm saying is that I've learned that just by existing within the same space man and animal can form bonds.

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Post by Anjum » 25 Nov 2017, 05:49

I love cats but my mother doesn't like to have any pets.

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Post by Mailis » 10 Feb 2018, 13:22

We have a little Cairn terrier girl and guinea pig gentleman. Both are constantly lavished with love and I think the most brilliant lesson they give to our kids, is to respect all life and to treat animals well and with respect, because their wellbeing depends on us so much.

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Post by pinefamily » 10 Feb 2018, 16:24

We've always had animals of various kinds. There has almost always been at least one dog in our house, and the kids growing up had the usual array of pets: birds, turtles, rabbits, etc.
Now, my wife and I have quite the menagerie. A dog, birds (parrots, budgies, a cockatiel, and quail), pythons, lizards (monitors and dragons), rabbits, chickens (including six 3 week old chicks), and mice (for breeding to feed the reptiles). Also have a woodie colony to feed the lizards.

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