Lesson of the Book

Discuss the May 2017 Book of the Month, Farmer Beau's Farm by Kathleen Geiger.

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Lesson of the Book

Post by Amagine » 02 May 2017, 09:29

This book is for children but can also be an insightful read for adults as well. What do you think is the lesson/lessons to be learned from the book? Do you feel you gained anything by reading it?
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Post by e-tasana-williams » 02 May 2017, 13:30

Some lessons I see in the book are about acceptance/not being judgmental, friendship, being open to new experiences, and welcoming new people into your life. Farmer Beau and Bamma welcomed all the animals, and eventually Kailey and Sammy learned to accept and befriend Malissa.
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Post by csimmons032 » 02 May 2017, 20:23

I think the main lesson is not to be judgmental of others. No matter what the situation is, we never actually know what someone else is going through. If we can learn to put the judgmental part of us aside, and just see the people and try and get to know them, then you can possibly meet some new friends in the process. This book teaches us that differences shouldn't drive people apart. Differences don't make anyone better than anyone else, differences just make us human. In fact differences should make people more interesting to others. Life would be quite boring if we were all exactly the same.

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Post by Amagine » 02 May 2017, 20:46

I think that there is definitely a lesson in the book about accepting someone's differences and not making judgements on them. It's unfortunate that we see a lot of this in our world though.
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Post by Gravy » 02 May 2017, 23:56

I agree with what everyone has said.
And if you'll forgive the wording, not to judge a book by its cover.

I also agree that it is far too prevalent.
Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.

The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.

The greater the power, the more dangerous the abuse.


:reading-4:

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Post by hsimone » 03 May 2017, 01:25

I agree with what everyone says here: to be accepting and realize that even if we all look different on the outside, we all have feelings and want to feel loved.
"Love is patient, love is kind." -1 Corinthians 13:4

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Post by Amagine » 03 May 2017, 05:45

Do any of you feel that this is a lesson that children will comprehend? If a child was reading the book by themself, is the message of the book simple enough for them?

I think that it is but I also think this a book that should with a parent and child together. That way they can have on depth conversations about it.
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Post by Christina O Phillips » 05 May 2017, 09:25

Besides what everyone is saying about not being judgmental and being kind to others, I also saw the lesson of how to deal with change. Kailey went from being one of six to one, then made a new friend, then another animal was added. Kailey and Sammy were worried that they wouldn't be loved as much with the new addition, but it worked out. This works as a reminder that change can be good, and since it's a kids book, it could work if their family is about to add another kid.

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Post by godreaujea » 06 May 2017, 16:52

I agree with all of these suggestions, and I feel like if a child didn't pick up these messages, then the person reading the book can always have a conversation with the child so they understand it a bit better.

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Post by Tomiwa » 06 May 2017, 19:16

some of the lessons learnt from the book are ,be friendly to everyone, learn to accapt others,because Kailey and Sammy learned to accept and befriend Malissa

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Post by hsimone » 07 May 2017, 05:22

I read somewhere, maybe it was your review, Amagine, there is a theme of bullying. Bullying is also such an important topic to discuss with children. How easy is it for a child to be so worried about someone's differences that they point out their flaws to make themselves feel better? And how quickly is it for someone to laugh about those flaws? Such a great topic to discuss with children, as well.
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Post by Amagine » 07 May 2017, 09:30

hsimone wrote:I read somewhere, maybe it was your review, Amagine, there is a theme of bullying. Bullying is also such an important topic to discuss with children. How easy is it for a child to be so worried about someone's differences that they point out their flaws to make themselves feel better? And how quickly is it for someone to laugh about those flaws? Such a great topic to discuss with children, as well.
You're absolutely right, hsimone. I think bullying is a conversation that parents should have with children as early as possible. Most people wait until it is a problem before they address bullying. By that time, it's too late because the damage has been done.

When young children bully, adults write it off as harmless and just call it "teasing." Basically, they don't take it seriously at all. So the child never reflects on it or treat it seriously either. They think what they're doing is harmless...until it isn't.
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Post by Tomiwa » 08 May 2017, 05:29

i learnt that we should not judge others,we should also love others regardless of our individual differences

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Post by hsimone » 09 May 2017, 09:03

Amagine wrote:
hsimone wrote:I read somewhere, maybe it was your review, Amagine, there is a theme of bullying. Bullying is also such an important topic to discuss with children. How easy is it for a child to be so worried about someone's differences that they point out their flaws to make themselves feel better? And how quickly is it for someone to laugh about those flaws? Such a great topic to discuss with children, as well.
You're absolutely right, hsimone. I think bullying is a conversation that parents should have with children as early as possible. Most people wait until it is a problem before they address bullying. By that time, it's too late because the damage has been done.

When young children bully, adults write it off as harmless and just call it "teasing." Basically, they don't take it seriously at all. So the child never reflects on it or treat it seriously either. They think what they're doing is harmless...until it isn't.
These are very good points, Amagine. The negativity of bullying and teasing should be taught a young age before it actually happens. It truly breaks my heart when I see a child acting so harshly toward someone else.
"Love is patient, love is kind." -1 Corinthians 13:4

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Post by Donnavila Marie01 » 12 May 2017, 09:30

csimmons032 wrote:I think the main lesson is not to be judgmental of others. No matter what the situation is, we never actually know what someone else is going through. If we can learn to put the judgmental part of us aside, and just see the people and try and get to know them, then you can possibly meet some new friends in the process. This book teaches us that differences shouldn't drive people apart. Differences don't make anyone better than anyone else, differences just make us human. In fact differences should make people more interesting to others. Life would be quite boring if we were all exactly the same.
I agree. We have our differences. Our attainment in life does not give us the ticket to judge others. We must also put in mind that we have our own weaknesses.

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