Buddhism in "Diary of an Immortal"

Discuss the February 2017 Book of the Month, The Diary of an Immortal by David J Castello.
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Kinnera
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Re: Buddhism in "Diary of an Immortal"

Post by Kinnera » 05 Aug 2017, 20:52

Pilar Guerrero wrote:I think that the perspective on Buddhism in the novel has to do with how strong can the characters hold to the principles, and I think each one of them, Steven and Chow Li follow their own principles. On the other hand, I think the novel is portraying the role of fate or destiny, these things had been written and now it was the time for them to take place. It is interesting, though, how the author incorporates the topic of religion or no religion in his novel, it makes us think about what is right and what is not. Like this question.
I do agree that the belief system is the point of focus and while it has little to do with actual religion, it does capture the strength of principle.

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Winnie Pui
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Post by Winnie Pui » 11 Sep 2017, 05:38

Hi, I'm Buddhist myself and a lot of it's philosophy propels around karma. Be it harming insects, it is considered as the taking of a life. In Dharma class when I was younger, we used to discuss the karma around eating the food that we see today. If the butcher kills the cow and we eat it, who gets the bad karma? The butcher, or us, who demands the cow's meat? For the intention lies in us, who fuels the demand for meat.

However, the argument is that the karma reflects worst on the butcher as the butcher holds the ultimate decision: to kill, or not to kill. Then again, by asking that of the butcher, our intentions are equally evil in the eyes of Buddhism. But the deed itself lies in the hands of the butcher.

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Winnie Pui
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Post by Winnie Pui » 11 Sep 2017, 05:38

Hi, I'm Buddhist myself and a lot of it's philosophy propels around karma. Be it harming insects, it is considered as the taking of a life. In Dharma class when I was younger, we used to discuss the karma around eating the food that we see today. If the butcher kills the cow and we eat it, who gets the bad karma? The butcher, or us, who demands the cow's meat? For the intention lies in us, who fuels the demand for meat.

However, the argument is that the karma reflects worst on the butcher as the butcher holds the ultimate decision: to kill, or not to kill. Then again, by asking that of the butcher, our intentions are equally evil in the eyes of Buddhism. But the deed itself lies in the hands of the butcher.

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Ashley Simon
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Post by Ashley Simon » 22 Sep 2017, 04:26

ananya92 wrote:Buddhism is more than just a religion; it is more like a way of life.
This is what drew me to Buddhism in the first place. I'm fascinated by the way Buddhism doesn't claim to be a religious dogma - it's a breath of fresh air, and I'm interested in learning more about it. My first introduction to Buddhism was when I picked up a short volume of poetry by Hafiz.

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Post by Anjum » 03 Dec 2017, 07:32

I learnt a lot more about Buddhism. It is really fun to see the world from a different perspective and learn about different cultures and beliefs of people.

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