Epic/Urban Fantasy?

Discuss the December 2016 Book of the Month, Nightlord by Garon Whited.
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Epic/Urban Fantasy?

Post by Gravy » 02 Dec 2016, 07:36

What do you think of the way this starts out in the "real" world, but ends up somewhere else?

I've only found this a few times and have been pleasently surprised by the hybrid of epic and urban fantasy.
Do you know of any other books that utilize this? Did you enjoy it?
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Post by hsimone » 02 Dec 2016, 08:02

This is an interesting question. I'm not sure if I read a lot where we start in the "real" world and end up somewhere else. Although, the concept does intrigue me. The switching gives a sense of mystery and intrigue to the read. For this read, I think there is a bit too much time spent in the other world where Eric doesn't seem too focused on the reason why he ended up being there in the first place... :eusa-think:
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Post by gali » 02 Dec 2016, 23:21

I love it. "Roan" was the same. I love books that mix between the "real" world" and fantasy.
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Post by littlefrog » 03 Dec 2016, 22:16

One old story I remember of switching from the Real world to fantasy was the Wizard of Oz. I really think that in Eric's case he had to go back to the "old world"...the only one in the present that was able to teach him was gone. I do not think that he forgets about his mission, to get revenge on the Cardinal of Telon, but he must first learn about his own new way of life...how he can manipulate and use his new powers. Eric has to learn about his enemies, he really can't defeat them if he doesn't know what he is up against. I feel the author is doing a great job of showing us how this "new Vampire" image was created. The Author is explaining the differences of the day walkers and the night walkers. We as readers are used to the Vampires dying in the daylight, burning with holy water, having to sleep in coffins...etc. Garon Whited is teaching us, we are learning along with Eric.

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Post by Ripley3131 » 14 Dec 2016, 20:34

Perhaps the most famous series that comes to mind where this type of transformation happens in the storyline was C.S. Lewis's The Lion The Witch And The Wardrobe. I have not seen this happen very often as far as I can remember. I thought that Garon did a good job with it, and it definitely came as a surprise to me.

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Post by Gravy » 14 Dec 2016, 21:11

Ripley3131 wrote:Perhaps the most famous series that comes to mind where this type of transformation happens in the storyline was C.S. Lewis's The Lion The Witch And The Wardrobe. I have not seen this happen very often as far as I can remember. I thought that Garon did a good job with it, and it definitely came as a surprise to me.
I never thought of that, but you're right!
It's not a common trait in fiction, but I've found it to be quite interesting. I have seen it used in a more limited way, such as how Jim Butcher uses Fairy in The Dresden Files.
Alice in Wonderland is another example, which could explain my fascination with it. I love Alice.
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Post by Jennifer Allsbrook » 16 Dec 2016, 17:43

One of the books I read and reviewed recently included this aspect. Haven by Dria Andersen, involved a story where the main character was on the run and kept visiting clubs called Havens in major cities throughout the US in search of her missing sister. The Havens were actually safe-zones for Demigods on Earth. Liliana meets and falls for her "mate" Leonalph another Demi. There are otherworldly home realms for each type of Demi that can be reached through portals within the Havens. The story started out in a US city and the next thing you know Gods and Goddesses are meeting and following the fate of the world. More info can be found about the story on my reviewer page if anyone is interested. The mythology that this story was modeled after was based on some African Gods and Goddesses. I should mention that the story is an erotic romance as well!

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Post by mratdegraff91 » 20 Dec 2016, 21:48

Gravy wrote:What do you think of the way this starts out in the "real" world, but ends up somewhere else?

I've only found this a few times and have been pleasently surprised by the hybrid of epic and urban fantasy.
Do you know of any other books that utilize this? Did you enjoy it?
I found it fascinating. I love reading different books that take you to another world like this. As several have mentioned, there are a few that I have also read but none of which I enjoyed reading as much as this one.
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Post by Corybarclay » 27 Dec 2016, 02:09

I love this concept--books like The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe, Wizard of Oz, even Alice in Wonderland. I'm writing an urban fantasy book that uses this idea in a way..Still need to read Nightlord though.

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Post by Julie Ditton » 30 Dec 2016, 19:45

When reading this thread, the first books that occurred to me were Alice in Wonderland and Alice through the Looking Glass. Of course, as others have mentioned, The Lion, Witch and the Wardrobe and Wizard of Oz are also obvious examples. Many fantasy and science fiction books start on earth and cross into a different world. I would add the Dr. Who television series. The Doctor loved earth and is frequently whisking away his companions (who are frequently human) to strange new worlds.
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Post by Thimble » 01 Jan 2017, 19:51

I found this to be interesting. I've read other stories with a similar world device. Garon does a good job with it, but I would have liked to see what life was like more in our "reality" before he goes over.
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Post by James Craft » 05 Jan 2017, 15:20

Thimble wrote:I found this to be interesting. I've read other stories with a similar world device. Garon does a good job with it, but I would have liked to see what life was like more in our "reality" before he goes over.
It is a good device, and I agree it would have been nice to get a little more of the 'before.'

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Post by Corybarclay » 22 Jan 2017, 05:15

Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell is one of my favorite books, and it starts out in a pretty mundane, albeit beautiful 19th century English setting. By the end of the book, things get wild! I love how Susanna Clarke weaves magic with reality, where the magic in the story becomes the very fabric of life itself! Great stuff -- if you haven't read JS&MR yet, I highly recommend it.

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Post by kandscreeley » 23 Jan 2017, 15:25

I've seen this in quite a few books. The one that comes to mind first is by author Terry Brooks. I think it's Magic Kingdom for Sale-Sold. I kind of enjoy the back and forth between worlds in books such as this.
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Post by Mark Johnson » 09 Feb 2017, 03:11

Terry Brooks Magic Kingdom for Sale-Sold! is a great book. A really good urban fantasy series that I think is still going on is Jim Butcher's Dresden Files. That was my introduction to urban fantasy. Wasn't sure about the genre, but ended up really liking it. I read a couple of the books in the series. There are around fifteen books in the series, or something like that.

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