Review by Sakura5 -- Rediscovering the Wisdom of Human N...

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Sakura5
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Review by Sakura5 -- Rediscovering the Wisdom of Human N...

Post by Sakura5 »

[Following is a volunteer review of "Rediscovering the Wisdom of Human Nature" by Chet Shupe.]
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2 out of 4 stars
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Rediscovering the Wisdom of Human Nature by Chet Shupe is a non-fiction novel with the ambitious goal of revealing the truth about the real nature of human beings.

The author makes a strong claim: civilization made people unhappy because it functioned as a cage. Through the pages of his book, Shupe wants to guide us towards the realization that the more men rely on language, laws, and institutions, the more they deviate from their real essence and Nature.

Shupe claims that, six thousand years ago, human beings were freer and lived in spiritual communion. Even if life was harsher, humans were happier, because they were being true to their nature. But with the institution of marriage, humans started claiming private properties, thus creating the need for laws. Consequently, institutions were created to enforce those laws. But institutions and civilization separated us from the others, creating spiritual isolation. The author believes that this state of separation from Nature will end when humans will start living again in sisterhoods and brotherhoods. These are communal systems in which human beings live together in harmony, putting the lives of others before their own. But at the same time, Shupe cannot offer a precise scheme of how and when this could happen, even if he is convinced it will happen someday.

I found some aspects of this book quite intriguing. For example, I agree with the author’s claim that the capitalistic culture we live in provokes a state of emotional isolation. I think it is true that this system is causing distress and anxiety because we always need to excel and rely on money to survive. The chapter I liked the most was for sure the one dedicated to soldiers: the author offers the military experience as proof that our true nature did not disappear, but is just dormant. In case of necessity, like when at war, it awakens. Soldiers on the field offer an example of brotherhood: they live in communion and understand that they have to stick together for a higher purpose, putting their own lives at risk to save and protect the group.

However, there were several things that bothered me about this book. For example, the author claims that before civilization, human beings loved each other “unconditionally” (p. 20). But, for how much we can know about the way our prehistoric ancestors lived, we simply cannot measure the degree of love they felt toward each other. Moreover, I found that many concepts were quite repetitive. Maybe repetitions were intended to make the message clearer, but in my opinion, they were counterproductive at some point. Also, I didn’t find the writing style to be very fluent: quite often, I was confused by the excessive use of commas, which rendered the text less clear.

For these reasons, I would rate the book 2 out of 4 stars. One star was taken off for the several editing mistakes and incongruities, and one for the other issues described above. No profane language was used, but for the kind of topic treated I would suggest this book only to an adult public. People of diverse religious beliefs should not be bothered by the material here presented, even if some references to the Christian religion are mentioned. People intrigued by speculations and critical thinking about human nature and spirituality could find this book interesting.

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Rediscovering the Wisdom of Human Nature
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Kirsi_78
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Post by Kirsi_78 »

This book has some ideas that go totally over my head. I like to challenge my thinking from time to time, but I am still not sure if I would enjoy reading this book. However, it has piqued my interest so I might end up reading it anyway :eusa-think: :ugeek2:

Thank you for an insightful review!
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Post by Marcel Cantu »

It seems like this book poses some interesting ideas, but could be better supported. Thank you for the honest and insightful review!
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Sakura5
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Post by Sakura5 »

Kirsi_78 wrote: 10 May 2021, 04:36 This book has some ideas that go totally over my head. I like to challenge my thinking from time to time, but I am still not sure if I would enjoy reading this book. However, it has piqued my interest so I might end up reading it anyway :eusa-think: :ugeek2:

Thank you for an insightful review!
I was unsure if reading it too at the beginning. But then, even if I don't agree with all the author said, I think some concepts are really eye-opening! Thanks for your comment!
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Sakura5
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Post by Sakura5 »

Marcel Cantu wrote: 10 May 2021, 08:52 It seems like this book poses some interesting ideas, but could be better supported. Thank you for the honest and insightful review!
Exactly, the lack of a "scientific" basis to what the author was expressing was one of the things that bothered me the most. Thanks for your comment!
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Post by Kavita Shah »

It's a book that has debatable points. Many times one can agree but most of the times not. Being uncivil and loving sounds great. But if the same can happen in being civil that won't be bad either. Thank you for your honest and detailed review!
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Post by Naaya123 »

This isn't my type of book. I'm not sure I'd enjoy it very much. Great review though!
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Post by Fireside119 »

Communal living isn't my cup of tea, but I would like to read the author's views on how to optimize human interactions. I hope the text undergoes a round of editing since multiple errors are a distraction.
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Post by NetMassimo »

Ancient traces of cannibalism, including among Neanderthals, seems to challenge the idea that ancient humans loved each other. It's difficult to read into the minds of people who lived so long ago based on scattered bones and sometimes just a few tools, so speculations can be interesting, particularly on their spirituality, but it's really hard to prove anything. Thank you for your honest review!
Ciao :)
Massimo
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Post by Booklover Becca »

I had the same feelings when reading this book. I agree we’re all out of sorts in the way society is, but I found his claims that people were happy and life simply worked out in prehistoric societies to be ridiculous. Great review though!
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Sakura5
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Post by Sakura5 »

Kavita Shah wrote: 11 May 2021, 10:01 It's a book that has debatable points. Many times one can agree but most of the times not. Being uncivil and loving sounds great. But if the same can happen in being civil that won't be bad either. Thank you for your honest and detailed review!
yes absolutely, there would be a lot to discuss about this book! Thanks for your comment.
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Sakura5
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Post by Sakura5 »

Naaya123 wrote: 11 May 2021, 11:26 This isn't my type of book. I'm not sure I'd enjoy it very much. Great review though!
Thanks for stopping by!
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Sakura5
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Post by Sakura5 »

Fireside119 wrote: 11 May 2021, 14:40 Communal living isn't my cup of tea, but I would like to read the author's views on how to optimize human interactions. I hope the text undergoes a round of editing since multiple errors are a distraction.
Personally, I like some of his views, while others seemed just unfeasible! Thanks for your comment!
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Sakura5
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Post by Sakura5 »

NetMassimo wrote: 12 May 2021, 07:05 Ancient traces of cannibalism, including among Neanderthals, seems to challenge the idea that ancient humans loved each other. It's difficult to read into the minds of people who lived so long ago based on scattered bones and sometimes just a few tools, so speculations can be interesting, particularly on their spirituality, but it's really hard to prove anything. Thank you for your honest review!
Oh wow, I was not even aware of that, thanks for this information! Then it is definitely difficult to state primitive people loved each other unconditionally :D Thank you for your comment!
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Sakura5
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Post by Sakura5 »

Booklover Becca wrote: 12 May 2021, 16:02 I had the same feelings when reading this book. I agree we’re all out of sorts in the way society is, but I found his claims that people were happy and life simply worked out in prehistoric societies to be ridiculous. Great review though!
I am happy to see I was not the only one having strong opinions about this book :D Thank you for commenting!
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