Review by Amanda Deck -- The Warramunga's Aftermath of War

This forum is for volunteer reviews by members of our review team. These reviews are done voluntarily by the reviewers and are published in this forum, separate from the official professional reviews. These reviews are kept separate primarily because the same book may be reviewed by many different reviewers.
Post Reply
User avatar
Amanda Deck
Posts: 358
Joined: 02 Jun 2018, 21:00
Currently Reading: Control Room
Bookshelf Size: 74
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-amanda-deck.html
Latest Review: Yesterday by Samyann

Review by Amanda Deck -- The Warramunga's Aftermath of War

Post by Amanda Deck » 17 Jun 2019, 16:32

[Following is a volunteer review of "The Warramunga's Aftermath of War" by Greg Kater.]
Book Cover
4 out of 4 stars
Share This Review


Jamie Munro and Jack O’Brien (Jacko) are part of a rescue mission in the sea north of Australia. A foundering ship is recovered, but what they find on board is horrifying. The rescue team realizes they have come across a ship involved in trafficking of children. They set the wheels in motion to uncover who’s behind this so they can end it as soon as possible. Unfortunately, the network of evil stretches from Australia to the Philippines and the United States. Making things even more difficult is the fact that many of those involved are in powerful positions. Our guys can trust no one, maybe not even those who are supposed to help stop the trafficking.

The Warramunga’s Aftermath of War is the second book of three by Greg Kater involving these characters. Each stands alone, but once you’ve read one, you’ll probably want to read another! Jamie and Jacko are brave, intelligent men who are willing to risk their lives completing dangerous missions to save others. Jacko’s girlfriend lives in Egypt; he’s desperate to see her again. Jamie is unattached - until he meets a woman who helps them as a translator, that is. She makes him rethink the idea of staying outside the unsettling world of romance.

I’m fascinated by the settings of Australia’s Northern Territory and of the Philippines that Kater so vividly describes. Wild areas replete with dangers such as enormous crocodiles, backwoods towns with one store, and large cities with all the amenities, all play their part. The language at times sounded odd to me which was perfect for keeping me in the scene. I felt I was in a different time and place from where I was in reality. Unfamiliar terms were generally made clear from the action. Kater does an excellent job of drawing the reader into the scenes and drama of the story.

One thing I found unbelievable is how open Jamie and Jacko were about their undercover mission. Almost everyone was a possible suspect, making secrecy of utmost importance. Then they recruited people off the street to help, giving way more information than they should! One man they trusted gave a clue that he wasn’t as safe as they thought. He wasn’t told that all the children in this case were boys, yet the man called the traffickers (among other strong epithets) a ‘bunch of queers’. Didn’t that indicate that he knew more than he should as an innocent man? But he wasn’t one of the bad guys. That struck me as unrealistic.

It surprised me to feel like I was coming to the end of the book as things wound down only halfway through. The first part of the mission came to an end, but then the action accelerated again. The next segment of the investigation was even more dangerous and suspenseful. I really enjoyed this well-edited, well-written novel that Kater, in his biography, tells us is inspired by his and his father’s real experiences in that part of the world. I would probably take off a half star for the unbelievability of some parts, but not a whole star. I rate it 4 out of 4 stars.

This is a book for readers who like skilled, capable men willing to risk whatever it takes to accomplish good in the world. It’s also for anyone who wants to be immersed in dangerous areas of the world with characters who insist bad guys don’t get away with their crimes.

******
The Warramunga's Aftermath of War
View: on Bookshelves | on Amazon

Like Amanda Deck's review? Post a comment saying so!
Latest Review: Yesterday by Samyann

User avatar
Renee_Prior1995
Posts: 245
Joined: 20 May 2019, 12:33
Currently Reading: If Life Stinks, Get Your Head Outta Your But's
Bookshelf Size: 29
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-renee-prior1995.html
Latest Review: Burn Zones by Jorge P. Newbery

Post by Renee_Prior1995 » 18 Jun 2019, 23:40

Interesting review, and an interesting book. Not sure if it is my type of read, but thanks for reviewing.
"From what I have tasted of desire,
I hold those who favor fire.
but if I had to perish twice,
I think I know enough of hate.
To say that the destruction of ice is also great
and will suffice." - Robert Frost

User avatar
Amanda Deck
Posts: 358
Joined: 02 Jun 2018, 21:00
Currently Reading: Control Room
Bookshelf Size: 74
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-amanda-deck.html
Latest Review: Yesterday by Samyann

Post by Amanda Deck » 21 Jun 2019, 17:06

I wasn't so sure myself until I read his Skills of the Warramunga. The way he brought to life that part of the world, making me feel the heat and humidity, hear the jungle sounds, feel the caution and worry of the characters, really impressed me so I knew I'd have to read another.
Latest Review: Yesterday by Samyann

Post Reply

Return to “Volunteer Reviews”