Discussing a Pet's Death

Discuss the September 2016 Book of the Month, A Spiritual Dog: Bear by J. Wesley Porter.
Christine_B
Posts: 44
Joined: 26 Nov 2015, 00:55
Currently Reading: Silver Shadows
Bookshelf Size: 1976
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-christine-b.html
Latest Review: "The Banned Book about Love" by Scott Hughes

Re: Discussing a Pet's Death

Post by Christine_B » 17 Nov 2016, 22:53

I think it depends on where the kids is in their life. I'm on the fence about if this is a good topic for a kids book or not.

User avatar
CzechTigg
Posts: 257
Joined: 28 Sep 2015, 13:48
2017 Reading Goal: 30
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 0
Currently Reading: Free Fish Friday
Bookshelf Size: 36
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-czechtigg.html
Latest Review: "Finding the Phoenix" by Caitlin O'Connor

Post by CzechTigg » 22 Nov 2016, 12:36

Death is part of life. I was very impressionable seeing Disney and Japanese animated movies with tragic deaths from the age of 2 onwards. Awareness of the reality that is mortality is a good thing to have, even if it can be a burden too. The first time I lost a pet was hard, but it was also a relief as he would only suffer with a terminal condition otherwise.

User avatar
jessejaiden94
Posts: 30
Joined: 23 Nov 2016, 23:26
Currently Reading: shiva and dionysus
Bookshelf Size: 10
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-jessejaiden94.html

Post by jessejaiden94 » 26 Nov 2016, 21:00

I don't think the discussion of a pet's death in a children's book is extreme in any way.

In my North American culture, we have been known to shelter our kids from death, because we ourselves are fearful of death, in turn making them fearful of death. Then they teach their kids the same behavior and the cycle continues on into eternity, perpetuating ignorance.

I think that death should be familiarized and integrated into society. Death is sacred. Death is implied by life. Children should be taught about death and sex and love and hate and all the other things humans do that we hide from even ourselves.

Writers! Write about death!

User avatar
lolashoes
Posts: 195
Joined: 10 Jul 2016, 01:49
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 149
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-lolashoes.html
Latest Review: "Raven's Peak" by Lincoln Cole

Post by lolashoes » 04 Dec 2016, 05:14

Death is not a foreign concept to children but I do think they just need a sugarcoated version of the story when explaining to them the death of a family pet.

User avatar
Diving doc
Posts: 37
Joined: 06 Dec 2016, 05:26
Bookshelf Size: 13
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-diving-doc.html
Latest Review: "The Banned Book about Love" by Scott Hughes

Post by Diving doc » 07 Dec 2016, 04:11

I think a lot of our misconceptions and awkward behaviour as adults towards death and grieving stems from the fact that we frequently try to protect children from this, thus making it a taboo subject.

User avatar
CataclysmicKnight
Posts: 750
Joined: 26 Jan 2015, 19:51
2018 Reading Goal: 100
2017 Reading Goal: 150
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 42
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 61
Favorite Book: Ready Player One
Currently Reading: The Banned Book about Love
Bookshelf Size: 524
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-cataclysmicknight.html
Latest Review: The Marble Wave by Massimo Mandolini Pesaresi
Location: Bourbon, IN

Post by CataclysmicKnight » 14 Dec 2016, 18:09

I don't think it is, as long as it's not something gruesome (sickness as opposed to, say, barbaric slaughter). Death is a sad reality that everyone has to come to grips with eventually, and the death of a loved pet can be as heart-wrenching as the death of a family member. It's an interesting way to approach the subject of death and may be particularly relatable to children who have already lost one.
Nothing is true, everything is permitted.

rvenkat
Posts: 24
Joined: 06 Dec 2016, 19:24
Currently Reading: Nightlord: Sunset
Bookshelf Size: 13
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-rvenkat.html
Latest Review: "10 Step Plan to Promote Your Book" by Scott Hughes

Post by rvenkat » 18 Dec 2016, 17:40

Agree with many posters that the details of the death can be avoided since one won't be sure about who would be reading the details. For some children, it could be very new, and might need parental guidance. Exposing it when they are not ready is not healthy.

User avatar
angelbeats1
Posts: 150
Joined: 03 Feb 2015, 20:02
Bookshelf Size: 27
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-angelbeats1.html
Latest Review: "Next Stop: Nina" by Robin Raven

Post by angelbeats1 » 20 Dec 2016, 21:49

Although it may be a not so cheerful topic to include in a children's book, it should not be avoided. Naturally, pets will die and it should not be considered taboo to talk about them. Children need to understand their own feelings and seeing that topic will help them relate.

csimmons032
Posts: 687
Joined: 27 Feb 2015, 21:49
Favorite Author: Stephenie Meyer
Favorite Book: Twilight and The Last Song
Currently Reading: Bluewater Walkabout
Bookshelf Size: 718
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-csimmons032.html
Latest Review: "Book Blueprint" by Jacqui Pretty
fav_author_id: 2594
Location: California

Post by csimmons032 » 29 Apr 2017, 16:54

I don't think it is a bad thing for children to learn about death through these books. I think it could help them understand a little better and it could help them cope with this type of situation later in life. As long it is dealt with in a good way, I don't see anything wrong with it.

interrupted_girl
Posts: 34
Joined: 25 Apr 2017, 21:00
Bookshelf Size: 5

Post by interrupted_girl » 29 Apr 2017, 17:01

Illness and death are part of life. Best if the subject is discussed with kids by parents first, not through a book first!
Thank you?

User avatar
Cinnamon-Paige
Posts: 21
Joined: 05 May 2017, 16:01
2017 Reading Goal: 100
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 9
Currently Reading: the little friend
Bookshelf Size: 14
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-cinnamon-paige.html
Latest Review: "The 11.05 Murders" by Brian O'Hare

Post by Cinnamon-Paige » 13 May 2017, 12:53

Since I work with children on a daily basis, I agree with others on this forum. The book would be a great counselling tool for a child who has already lost a pet but for those who haven't experienced that type of loss yet, it may be distressing especially due to the graphic description that the author gives of Bear's illness. However, one can argue that the book can be utilized as a preparatory instrument in the case of a child who is attached to a pet that is perhaps in the winter of their life or that has just been diagnosed with a terminal illness.

JUNAFE21
Posts: 10
Joined: 25 Apr 2017, 21:12
Bookshelf Size: 5

Post by JUNAFE21 » 28 May 2017, 01:50

It's not easy losing someone whom you ever loved. Its not just about pet but the fact that pet gives you so much joy and a kind of love that is eternal. Pet is not like us humans but they have a big heart that they can give to us. They give us so much trust that and comfort that's why they called a pet a humans bestfriend. But when the time comes and they bid goodbye to us. Its so painful to see those pets dying. How i wish they can have an eternal life no farewells just forever. But its more painful to see that your children missing your pets. Just comfort them and explained everything and they understands why pets are just passin by and leave marks unto your heart with a good memories to treasure .

NikkyT
Posts: 80
Joined: 12 Jun 2017, 17:56
Bookshelf Size: 18
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-nikkyt.html
Latest Review: "My Trip to Adele" by A.I.Alyaseer, R.I.Alyaseer
Reading Device: B00KC6I06S

Post by NikkyT » 04 Jul 2017, 18:40

Books can really help to explain to a child in the right way for them to process the information. So if it's written in the right way I think it can work on most situations, not just the death of a pet but anything sensitive.

User avatar
IsabelMay
Posts: 234
Joined: 21 Jun 2017, 04:36
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 3636
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-isabelmay.html
Latest Review: "Anna's Journey" by Gerald Miller

Post by IsabelMay » 20 Jul 2017, 07:08

I think it's a bit tricky, due to the audience the book is for, but it's still an important theme. I absolutely hate talking about my own pet's death, it's painful to remember and live through that again. Still, it can unburden your mind. Children should be taught how to talk about it and deal with it, sooner or later they will be faced with it again. It's sad, but it's a part of living.

User avatar
eelavahs-jay
Posts: 188
Joined: 11 Sep 2017, 16:00
2017 Reading Goal: 0
Currently Reading: Island of the Gods
Bookshelf Size: 34
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-eelavahs-jay.html
Latest Review: Marrying a Playboy Billionaire by H M Irwing

Post by eelavahs-jay » 28 Sep 2017, 22:09

Death is definitely not too sensitive a topic for a children's book. It's important that they learn to come to terms with loss as it's a natural part of life.

Post Reply

Return to “"A Spiritual Dog: Bear" by J. Wesley Porter”