Start-to-finish Book vs. Series

Discuss the September 2016 Book of the Month, A Spiritual Dog: Bear by J. Wesley Porter.
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Rachaelamb1
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Re: Start-to-finish Book vs. Series

Post by Rachaelamb1 » 25 Oct 2016, 20:11

I think they enjoy series more. There is something about picking up a book about a familiar character and an unfamiliar plot that is exciting :)

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Jennifer Allsbrook
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Post by Jennifer Allsbrook » 25 Oct 2016, 22:52

bookowlie wrote:This book is a start-to-finish book about a dog's life. It covers the various things that happened to Bear over the course of his life - his adjustments after being adopted, interests and quirks, aging issues, etc. I started thinking about the popularity of children's series about a character's adventures.

Do children prefer one start-to-finish book or a series of books about the same character?
I would have to say this likely depends on the individual child and how much exposure that child has had to reading. I love to read and worked to instill that same love in my son. We read both start-to-finish books and series and I believe for him, the series style won out. Some of the series that we read, me reading to him at first and then him reading to me as his skills grew, included Harry Potter, Percy Jackson, the Deltora Quest series, Inheritance Cycle, Mistborn trilogy, Ink Heart trilogy, Pendragon series, and so many more. I must say that the time I spent each night reading to my son were some of the most precious hours of my life. He is a college freshman now and what I would give for just one more evening to sit quietly and enjoy a good book snuggled together in the recliner!

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Post by Douwe » 26 Oct 2016, 00:13

I am 13 years old and since i was 9 I started reading series, and since then I couldn't stop.
A book is great but a series keeps going for much longer and there is much more to enjoy. (if it's a good series)
Books like the "Bridge To Terabithia" were some of my favorite non-series books.
But as said before age and personal opinion makes a big difference!

-Douwe

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Post by DancingSouls » 01 Nov 2016, 05:43

In my opinion, it definitely depends on the age. I agree that focusing on one lovable character is probably better than focusing on a novel of characters for young children. Older children will grow to like a bit more characters and a bit more complex adventure or situations. In school young children start out with simpler stories and as they move up in the years the stories advance along with their skills.

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Post by Swara Sangeet » 02 Nov 2016, 05:20

I think either is okay as long as people are interested to read. Start-to-finish books give just as much happiness as do series books. Personally, I think that people writing series need to be more talented to keep the reader's interest. Leaving a cliffhanger at the end of the story gives an intriguing thought to await eagerly for the release of the next book.

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Post by AA1495 » 02 Nov 2016, 19:04

I agree that it depends on the age and preferences of the child. I have always preferred stories that end with the books.

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Post by ebeth » 06 Nov 2016, 16:05

Well right now my niece and nephew are at that stage where they just like the start-to-finish books. They haven't read any series yet.

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Post by lovereading2 » 21 Dec 2016, 21:22

I think I agree with the above commenters. It'd depend on the age of the child. And probably every child's preference is different. Both bring something different to the table. :)

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Post by Anjum » 25 Nov 2017, 06:13

I think one start-to-finish book would hold the child's attention longer.

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