What would you do?

Discuss the August 2016 Book of the Month, The Lost Identity Casualties by Kim Ekemar.

You can use this forum to discuss the sequels to this book.

View The Lost Identity Casualties on Bookshelves

View The Lost Identity Casualties on Amazon.
AuthoressofMystery
Posts: 61
Joined: 12 Aug 2016, 20:36
2017 Reading Goal: 123
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 0
Currently Reading: Finding Poe
Bookshelf Size: 348
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-authoressofmystery.html
Latest Review: "Learn English, Spanish, French, German, Turkish and Persian - Vocabulary Book Series" by Vahid Asghari
Reading Device: 1400697484

Re: What would you do?

Post by AuthoressofMystery » 30 Aug 2016, 03:08

I would probably lose it at first, then pull myself together and run away. Close off my old life, old contacts and start over.
The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.
Nobody made a greater mistake than he who did nothing because he could do only a little.

Edmond Burke
Latest Review: "Learn English, Spanish, French, German, Turkish and Persian - Vocabulary Book Series" by Vahid Asghari

Yelitzag08
Posts: 25
Joined: 17 Aug 2016, 23:00
Currently Reading: DIABLO NIGHTS
Bookshelf Size: 13
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-yelitzag08.html
Latest Review: "The Blood on My Hands" by Shannon O'Leary

Post by Yelitzag08 » 30 Aug 2016, 15:41

I think the thought of having a face change is kind of horrifying. We look in the mirror everyday and see the same face day after day. I can't imagine looking in the mirror and being unable to recognize the face in the mirror. If I really had to change my appearance drastically I would use make-up to go about this. Contouring can effectively make you look like a different person without the trauma of someone cutting into and rearranging your face. Even a new hair color/texture/style can cause people to have trouble recognizing you.
Latest Review: "The Blood on My Hands" by Shannon O'Leary

AA1495
Posts: 893
Joined: 17 Aug 2016, 14:45
2017 Reading Goal: 150
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 9
Favorite Book: <a href="http://forums.onlinebookclub.org/shelve ... 19636">Out of the Box Awakening</a>
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 90
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-aa1495.html
Latest Review: Nighthawk by Bill Bowers w/Sandee Hart

Post by AA1495 » 06 Sep 2016, 10:47

CatInTheHat wrote:
klbradley wrote:I have no idea what I would do. And I really don't think anyone does until/unless they are in a position like that.
True. We can think we'd know what we'd do but until we are actually experiencing it, we don't really know.
It's all very subjective. Noone can really understand another person's frame of mind and the decisions they make then. Everyone eventually does what they think is right.

-- 06 Sep 2016, 11:01 --
AuthoressofMystery wrote:I would probably lose it at first, then pull myself together and run away. Close off my old life, old contacts and start over.
Does starting over ever work? you still have all those memories.. all those feelings, you still miss people

Genaaa
Posts: 221
Joined: 09 Sep 2016, 21:51
Bookshelf Size: 18
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-genaaa.html
Latest Review: "A Messiahs Battle For The Human Realm" by Roberto Torres Rivera

Post by Genaaa » 10 Sep 2016, 02:53

Being in that situation is honestly really hard to even imagine. Obviously, I'd probably fall into sadness and even depression in the end. Though I'd try to not go overboard with my reaction, because drastic things can't be changed.
Latest Review: "A Messiahs Battle For The Human Realm" by Roberto Torres Rivera

AA1495
Posts: 893
Joined: 17 Aug 2016, 14:45
2017 Reading Goal: 150
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 9
Favorite Book: <a href="http://forums.onlinebookclub.org/shelve ... 19636">Out of the Box Awakening</a>
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 90
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-aa1495.html
Latest Review: Nighthawk by Bill Bowers w/Sandee Hart

Post by AA1495 » 10 Sep 2016, 11:32

Genaaa wrote:Being in that situation is honestly really hard to even imagine. Obviously, I'd probably fall into sadness and even depression in the end. Though I'd try to not go overboard with my reaction, because drastic things can't be changed.
Thats a sensible thing to do, but can you really control your emotions that way?

User avatar
Thimble
Posts: 261
Joined: 28 Mar 2015, 17:00
2017 Reading Goal: 30
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 66
Favorite Author: Agatha Christie
Favorite Book: <a href="http://forums.onlinebookclub.org/shelve ... 6338">Iron Kissed</a>
Currently Reading: A Wise Man's Fear
Bookshelf Size: 276
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-thimble.html
Latest Review: The Girl Who Knew Da Vinci by Belle Ami
Reading Device: B00JG8GOWU
fav_author_id: 2484

Post by Thimble » 17 Sep 2016, 22:43

I don't know what I would do. I don't think I would seek revenge, but I would try to take protective measures. I also might just try to start over with my new face. It depends on my own circumstances and what face I get.
"You can never leave footprints that last if you are always walking on tiptoe." - Leymah Gbowee

User avatar
MarisaRose
Previous Member of the Month
Posts: 1300
Joined: 03 Sep 2016, 15:34
2018 Reading Goal: 50
2017 Reading Goal: 25
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 66
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 400
Favorite Book: <a href="http://forums.onlinebookclub.org/shelve ... 665">Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban</a>
Currently Reading: The Sleepwalker
Bookshelf Size: 326
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-marisarose.html
Latest Review: A yard full of Wonder by Jean McCarthy
Reading Device: B00JG8GOWU

Post by MarisaRose » 27 Sep 2016, 08:38

This is such a tough question because it is so out of the normal realm of things. A face change is a major life event. I would hope that I would try to embrace it and make the best of things, start fresh, etc. However, I highly doubt it would be that easy. I think depression/sadness/need for revenge would all be emotions I'd be unable to ignore.
"No two persons ever read the same book." -Edmund Wilson

User avatar
CataclysmicKnight
Posts: 768
Joined: 26 Jan 2015, 19:51
2018 Reading Goal: 100
2017 Reading Goal: 150
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 56
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 61
Favorite Book: Ready Player One
Currently Reading: The Banned Book about Love
Bookshelf Size: 578
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-cataclysmicknight.html
Latest Review: The Story Of Autumn by Anne E. Reardon

Post by CataclysmicKnight » 29 Sep 2016, 14:28

stoppoppingtheP wrote: I'd probably do a lot of crying and go into major depression... :?
YUP! That's a caps-locked, Pam Halpert from The Office, YUP! I feel like, after all of that difficulty and even no longer looking like myself in the mirror, that'd be me. While I'd love to think I'd toughen up for the sake of revenge and righteousness, in all reality I can't really imagine that being reality.
Nothing is true, everything is permitted.

User avatar
godreaujea
Posts: 283
Joined: 20 Oct 2016, 13:37
2017 Reading Goal: 50
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 62
Currently Reading: Station Eleven
Bookshelf Size: 344
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-godreaujea.html
Latest Review: "Delightful Hands" by Andrew Pace

Post by godreaujea » 20 Oct 2016, 19:11

I know it is a total "what if" scenario, and this is fiction after all, but it is hard for me to comprehend what I do since this is such an unrealistic situation. Certainly, I would not act how he did in terms of revenge. I think I would go through some therapy and take comfort in knowing that I am still me.
Latest Review: "Delightful Hands" by Andrew Pace

User avatar
DancingSouls
Posts: 55
Joined: 24 Oct 2016, 20:46
Currently Reading: The Cult Next Door
Bookshelf Size: 13
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-dancingsouls.html

Post by DancingSouls » 25 Oct 2016, 00:45

I'd definitely like to seek revenge, but I don't think I could go through violent measures to achieve it. I like my face and a change to it would bring an identity crisis. People often times identify people through sight and the face is a key point of identification.

User avatar
Amcdanel86
Posts: 203
Joined: 12 Oct 2016, 04:22
2017 Reading Goal: 0
Favorite Author: Charlaine Harris
Currently Reading: The Girl Who Knew Da Vinci
Bookshelf Size: 52
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-amcdanel86.html
Latest Review: Diary of a Snoopy Cat by R.F. Kristi
fav_author_id: 3791

Post by Amcdanel86 » 25 Oct 2016, 03:25

I would be upset and probably go to therapy so that I would have a support system

User avatar
Jennifer Allsbrook
Posts: 916
Joined: 23 Jul 2016, 20:35
2018 Reading Goal: 70
2017 Reading Goal: 100
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 17
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 42
Favorite Book: Nightlord: Sunset
Currently Reading: An American Hedge Fund
Bookshelf Size: 133
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-jennifer-allsbrook.html
Latest Review: Audible Book of your Choice by Amazon

Post by Jennifer Allsbrook » 26 Oct 2016, 22:10

stoppoppingtheP wrote:When reading this book I was horrified by the events that occurred. The concept of having a face-change was difficult to comprehend. I wondered, if I was put in the the same situation as Callaghan, what I would do.


Truthfully, I don't know. I'd probably do a lot of crying and go into major depression... :?


What would you do?
This is an impossible thing to predict. I think that waking up and seeing that your fingers were missing would be shocking enough and not having a memory of what happened to you would send most people running from the room. Add to that the fact that you have had your face replaced by that of a man of a different ethnicity than your own, and you have a recipe for a nervous breakdown. The initial shock would be devastating. Our perception of self is so tied to our physical appearance. Even small changes like scarring can severely affect a person's self confidence. I think I would become deeply depressed. I don't know if I could go on. I would jump on the self pity train for sure. I though it interesting that Callaghan found some good things from the situation such as not having to look like his father anymore. That seemed to have been a point of contention for him. Also, he could move among members of his social group without being recognized. Overall, this was an interesting situation to consider as we read Callaghan's story.

Post Reply

Return to “"The Lost Identity Casualties" by Kim Ekemar”