Traditional dishes in your country

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Kalin Adi
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Re: Traditional dishes in your country

Post by Kalin Adi » 04 Aug 2017, 20:47

I'm Panamanian. Traditional food that I love: tamales, temptation plantains, chicheme, coconut rice, tostones (fried plantains), and many more. Okay! To tell you the truth, I like them all. :D :D :D :D :D

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Post by tarafarah7 » 05 Aug 2017, 05:36

Booky_BettyC wrote:Cabbage rolls are my ultimate favourite. My great grandma use to make her own sour cabbage and make her own specially spiced beef or pork, sometimes both, and rice for the filling. She also made her own red sauce for them. I live in Canada, but when I think of traditional food right away I think of my Ukrainian heritage.
Yumm...yummmmm! I love these!! What a great topic...I love hearing where everyone is from and about traditional dishes of each country! So much fun! :-)

-- 05 Aug 2017, 06:38 --
Kalin Adi wrote:I'm Panamanian. Traditional food that I love: tamales, temptation plantains, chicheme, coconut rice, tostones (fried plantains), and many more. Okay! To tell you the truth, I like them all. :D :D :D :D :D
Yesss! Yum! I love them all too!

-- 05 Aug 2017, 06:46 --
Stacy Liv wrote:I'm from the Caribbean so my traditional dish here in Jamaica is the Jerk Chicken it's season in local herbs and spices and then flamed grill, what makes this so good it the Jamaican jerk sauce
I'm a huge fan of Jerk Chicken! First time I had it was in Jamaica. I teach high school in Michigan, and one of my former students is Jamaican. I used to tell him all the time how much I loved Jerk Chicken. His mom made me some and brought it to lunch for me one day at work as a surprise. So nice of her! Thanks for sharing! :-)

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Post by bookiegalke » 11 Aug 2017, 08:23

ugali with sukumawiki is a popular dish among Kenyans
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Post by JustEthel » 19 Aug 2017, 09:40

I'm from the Philippines, and of course our favorite traditional food is adobo. But personally I also love our own version of menudo. And I also love halo-halo. Especially during the summer when it's so unbearably hot in our country, halo-halo is always our favorite refreshment.

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Post by juliusotinyo » 19 Aug 2017, 12:49

Ah, I have many. But the one my kids love the most when I cook for them (and I have the time!) is a type of slow cooked pork done inside an earthen pot/bowl. I have a large farm where I feed my pigs on corn and cowpeas. I select the 4-7 month olds. The meat is just tender enough for the process at that age.

The process is similar to the way the native Pacific Islanders (Hawaii, Samoa) do it. But, in my process the meat is cut to 1/4 pound sizes. Then put in the pot with an earthen lid in a low fire and left for up-to 6 hours. The only addition is salt but sometimes I add coconut milk and/or Tamarind. Eaten with either boiled rice, Ugali (a type of corn-bread common to East Africa) or bread. My wife and kids can't get enough of this meal.

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Post by Miriam Molina » 19 Aug 2017, 17:15

juliusotinyo wrote:Ah, I have many. But the one my kids love the most when I cook for them (and I have the time!) is a type of slow cooked pork done inside an earthen pot/bowl. I have a large farm where I feed my pigs on corn and cowpeas. I select the 4-7 month olds. The meat is just tender enough for the process at that age.

The process is similar to the way the native Pacific Islanders (Hawaii, Samoa) do it. But, in my process the meat is cut to 1/4 pound sizes. Then put in the pot with an earthen lid in a low fire and left for up-to 6 hours. The only addition is salt but sometimes I add coconut milk and/or Tamarind. Eaten with either boiled rice, Ugali (a type of corn-bread common to East Africa) or bread. My wife and kids can't get enough of this meal.
You always amaze me, brother! An engineer who writes, runs 12 miles (at least!) daily, and cooks a dish (that takes six hours to get done) for his wife and kids is someone I can only admire.

You see, I don't exercise and I don't cook. At least, I can write a little. :tiphat:

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Post by Excitedreads » 19 Aug 2017, 21:47

Miriam Molina wrote:
juliusotinyo wrote:Ah, I have many. But the one my kids love the most when I cook for them (and I have the time!) is a type of slow cooked pork done inside an earthen pot/bowl. I have a large farm where I feed my pigs on corn and cowpeas. I select the 4-7 month olds. The meat is just tender enough for the process at that age.

The process is similar to the way the native Pacific Islanders (Hawaii, Samoa) do it. But, in my process the meat is cut to 1/4 pound sizes. Then put in the pot with an earthen lid in a low fire and left for up-to 6 hours. The only addition is salt but sometimes I add coconut milk and/or Tamarind. Eaten with either boiled rice, Ugali (a type of corn-bread common to East Africa) or bread. My wife and kids can't get enough of this meal.
Awe inspiring! I hope u keep it up. On another note, i live in Trinidad. We have a whole lot of cuisines that are indigeneous to here, but i think the most popular would be doubles. It's bara and channa.... well simplified its fried dough thsts rolled out thinly, (the recipe is simple: salt, flour, baking powder and water) and curried channa. Trini style currying is very different from most places, but when drizzled with some cucumber chutney (cucumbers sliced thinly in pepper and salt and maybe a little vinegar), and some shadon benni sauce ( more commonly known as cilantro abroad), its just what u need after a long hot day. Sigh... now i want some doubles. :(
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Post by juliusotinyo » 19 Aug 2017, 22:29

Miriam Molina wrote:
juliusotinyo wrote:Ah, I have many. But the one my kids love the most when I cook for them (and I have the time!) is a type of slow cooked pork done inside an earthen pot/bowl. I have a large farm where I feed my pigs on corn and cowpeas. I select the 4-7 month olds. The meat is just tender enough for the process at that age.

The process is similar to the way the native Pacific Islanders (Hawaii, Samoa) do it. But, in my process the meat is cut to 1/4 pound sizes. Then put in the pot with an earthen lid in a low fire and left for up-to 6 hours. The only addition is salt but sometimes I add coconut milk and/or Tamarind. Eaten with either boiled rice, Ugali (a type of corn-bread common to East Africa) or bread. My wife and kids can't get enough of this meal.
You always amaze me, brother! An engineer who writes, runs 12 miles (at least!) daily, and cooks a dish (that takes six hours to get done) for his wife and kids is someone I can only admire.

You see, I don't exercise and I don't cook. At least, I can write a little. :tiphat:
Molina,
Thanks for your compliments :tiphat: maybe its just discipline. If you love what you do I guess it comes naturally. And i love to cook, write and exercise. Besides, who can resist the fresh cool mountain air of my rural Mt Elgon home. Thanks again, am flattered by your comments. See you soon.

-- 20 Aug 2017, 06:34 --
Excitedreads wrote:
Miriam Molina wrote:
juliusotinyo wrote:Ah, I have many. But the one my kids love the most when I cook for them (and I have the time!) is a type of slow cooked pork done inside an earthen pot/bowl. I have a large farm where I feed my pigs on corn and cowpeas. I select the 4-7 month olds. The meat is just tender enough for the process at that age.

The process is similar to the way the native Pacific Islanders (Hawaii, Samoa) do it. But, in my process the meat is cut to 1/4 pound sizes. Then put in the pot with an earthen lid in a low fire and left for up-to 6 hours. The only addition is salt but sometimes I add coconut milk and/or Tamarind. Eaten with either boiled rice, Ugali (a type of corn-bread common to East Africa) or bread. My wife and kids can't get enough of this meal.
Awe inspiring! I hope u keep it up. On another note, i live in Trinidad. We have a whole lot of cuisines that are indigeneous to here, but i think the most popular would be doubles. It's bara and channa.... well simplified its fried dough thsts rolled out thinly, (the recipe is simple: salt, flour, baking powder and water) and curried channa. Trini style currying is very different from most places, but when drizzled with some cucumber chutney (cucumbers sliced thinly in pepper and salt and maybe a little vinegar), and some shadon benni sauce ( more commonly known as cilantro abroad), its just what u need after a long hot day. Sigh... now i want some doubles. :(
Hi,
I love the Caribbean, the people, the general feel. I've never visited Trinidad though. Maybe next time, might even get me some of those "doubles."

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Post by Excitedreads » 19 Aug 2017, 22:54

U should try it. Don't think you'll be disappointed. But make sure you get the sauces. And it's hot. Best way to eat it ;)
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Post by RegularGuy3 » 04 Sep 2017, 15:15

This is not my national dish, but one I just tried and can't get enough of. Hakku chuala from Nepal. Cold spiced chicken served over hot rice and lentils. Spicy and delicious!

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Post by Steph K » 20 Sep 2017, 15:01

There are a couple of traditional Missouri dishes I enjoy. At family gatherings we always have seven layer salad. You take a trifle dish, layer lettuce, peas, shredded cheese, tomatoes, onion, crumbled bacon, mayonnaise, or whatever ingredients your family typically use, in the dish. Zucchini bread is also very popular in Missouri. Around here the majority of people have backyard gardens, and we have more zucchini than we know what to do with, so the bread is a way to use it up quickly. My grandmother makes it with chocolate chips in the batter. You can also take zucchini blooms off the plant and fry those. It's delicious. In this part of the state, St. Louis style pizza is popular. It has a very thin crust and the pizza is cut into small squares instead of triangles.

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Post by Oliver Ekaso » 25 Sep 2017, 07:05

I am a Nigerian. In the southern part where I come from its garri and soup. Garri is made from cassava while the soup is made from leafy vegetables, palm oil, pepper, onions, spices etc with meat/fish. Nothing like it.

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Post by maryam5 » 26 Sep 2017, 01:20

I am from Nigeria and one traditional food that i love is pounded yam with vegetable soup. The pounded yam is actually made from yam and the food is always yummy

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Post by diomedes durante » 26 Sep 2017, 06:15

I came from the Philippines , Bicol region, and one of our traditional dishes is "Pinangat ". This is prepared with chopped shrimps and young coconut fruits ; added with ingredients: such as union, garlic pepper, salt and this will be wrapped into our native leaf called "Gabi" in Filipino language. This will be cooked for about an hour, while the the Pinangat is dipped in water. Presto! You have now a tasty and delicious Pinangat, favorites by Bicolanos.

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Post by CambaReviewer » 28 Sep 2017, 11:42

This sounds delicious. Rice and lamb sound like an awesome combination!

-- 28 Sep 2017, 11:42 --

Very tempting. I like too!

-- 28 Sep 2017, 11:47 --

I like the Nigerian food called 'MoiMoi'. It is actually a form of bean pudding cooked by steaming blended soft beans that have been spiced with fish, eggs and condiments (to taste). It is highly nutritional and is a good way of introducing children to adult meals or for people convalescing from illness. It can be eaten with custard or pap (made from corn) or served with rice and chicken. Yummy!!

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