**Opinions Needed**

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What is the biggest issue you encounter when obtaining books?

High Cost
39
58%
Time (travel time to bookstore, library; time spent in bookstore, library; time spent ordering online; etc.)
4
6%
Other
5
7%
I don't encounter any of the above issues
19
28%
 
Total votes: 67

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DATo
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Re: **Opinions Needed**

Post by DATo » 14 May 2018, 06:54

ianbuchanan wrote:
08 May 2018, 16:40

Thank you very much for sharing your opinions and concerns! I hear them loud and clear. Before I address some of the topics you bring up here, I will say that the original idea has shifted from one that charges the end reader to a model that works alongside and on behalf of libraries to be the book delivery service provider. As a result, books would remain free to library members, whether they are delivered or not. Of course, this requires, if this idea is to be turned into a business, for libraries themselves to pay the company directly, as compensation for the value-added service it would provide to their members. While this would require a likely increase in funding to accomplish long-term, ample research has shown that increased usage of libraries, a pattern this idea would almost certainly create, results in increased public funding being directed to public libraries, which would optimally benefit libraries and the delivery service-providing company who generates revenue from these publicly funded libraries. If increased taxes to fund such a program would result, which is not or ever will be a goal, I think, any initiative that benefits community members, in this case granting wider-spread access to books, would we generally well received. Of course, taxes are taxes, and they are rarely taken lightly, which is why raising taxes to fund the service is not desired nor is it part of the idea.

To touch on your sentiment towards laziness and its increasing prevalence among consumers...I agree, as a character trait, it is deplorable. However, today, with time being of such importance, why not save it whenever possible. Wouldn't you rather enjoy your time with family or experiences than traveling to the library? I would strongly hesitate to even really consider a preference for delivery over in-store shopping lazy at all. We all want to save time, so why not do it when we can? It's the only thing in life we cannot get more of so we must protect it when the opportunity arises.

Please let me know what you think about my comments, I'm very interested in continuing a discussion and appreciate your insights very much. Thanks again for sharing your thoughts!
If those who choose to have books, groceries, or anything else delivered to their homes are willing to pay the entire cost for this added service then I have no argument with such a plan. My complaint, and I think it is a valid one, consists with the involuntary participation of people who do not wish to participate in such a plan being forced to under duress ... I consider this a form of extortion.

Any increase in taxes for a library delivery service would normally be obtained as a result of a voter bond issue. If the citizens in my community would vote for such a service who am I to say ney? Frankly, I have a truly excellent library system where I live and I would be among the first to help support it, but I feel that a delivery service is not something important enough to warrant an increase in taxes or other costs to ALL library patrons. If people need more time for their families as you suggest in your reply I would suggest that they contract with a courier service to pick up library materials to be delivered to their homes and pay the cost for delivery themselves. I do not feel that I should have to pay for augmenting their allowance of valuable time. It is a personal issue which involves their own personal issues and convenience, not mine.
“I just got out of the hospital. I was in a speed reading accident. I hit a book mark and flew across the room.”
― Steven Wright

ianbuchanan
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Post by ianbuchanan » 14 May 2018, 15:10

DATo wrote:
14 May 2018, 06:54
ianbuchanan wrote:
08 May 2018, 16:40

Thank you very much for sharing your opinions and concerns! I hear them loud and clear. Before I address some of the topics you bring up here, I will say that the original idea has shifted from one that charges the end reader to a model that works alongside and on behalf of libraries to be the book delivery service provider. As a result, books would remain free to library members, whether they are delivered or not. Of course, this requires, if this idea is to be turned into a business, for libraries themselves to pay the company directly, as compensation for the value-added service it would provide to their members. While this would require a likely increase in funding to accomplish long-term, ample research has shown that increased usage of libraries, a pattern this idea would almost certainly create, results in increased public funding being directed to public libraries, which would optimally benefit libraries and the delivery service-providing company who generates revenue from these publicly funded libraries. If increased taxes to fund such a program would result, which is not or ever will be a goal, I think, any initiative that benefits community members, in this case granting wider-spread access to books, would we generally well received. Of course, taxes are taxes, and they are rarely taken lightly, which is why raising taxes to fund the service is not desired nor is it part of the idea.

To touch on your sentiment towards laziness and its increasing prevalence among consumers...I agree, as a character trait, it is deplorable. However, today, with time being of such importance, why not save it whenever possible. Wouldn't you rather enjoy your time with family or experiences than traveling to the library? I would strongly hesitate to even really consider a preference for delivery over in-store shopping lazy at all. We all want to save time, so why not do it when we can? It's the only thing in life we cannot get more of so we must protect it when the opportunity arises.

Please let me know what you think about my comments, I'm very interested in continuing a discussion and appreciate your insights very much. Thanks again for sharing your thoughts!
If those who choose to have books, groceries, or anything else delivered to their homes are willing to pay the entire cost for this added service then I have no argument with such a plan. My complaint, and I think it is a valid one, consists with the involuntary participation of people who do not wish to participate in such a plan being forced to under duress ... I consider this a form of extortion.

Any increase in taxes for a library delivery service would normally be obtained as a result of a voter bond issue. If the citizens in my community would vote for such a service who am I to say ney? Frankly, I have a truly excellent library system where I live and I would be among the first to help support it, but I feel that a delivery service is not something important enough to warrant an increase in taxes or other costs to ALL library patrons. If people need more time for their families as you suggest in your reply I would suggest that they contract with a courier service to pick up library materials to be delivered to their homes and pay the cost for delivery themselves. I do not feel that I should have to pay for augmenting their allowance of valuable time. It is a personal issue which involves their own personal issues and convenience, not mine.
Right, I see what you are saying. There shouldn't be a tax on imposed on community members that don't see any benefit from the delivery service personally. To that extent, I'd agree. The only problem, and it is a rather large one, is that library resources are, for all intents and purposes, meant to be provided to community members free of charge. Thus, charging just those that use the service, which does make the most sense from a business perspective, is not likely to be feasible within library systems' guiding policies.

Therefore, in order for a delivery service to be implemented, its funding would likely have to come from its apportionment from the state and/or work to similar to a pay-per-use model, in which scenario the library system agrees to pay the delivery service provider based on the added usage it generates of library material. Yes, I agree that some funds would have to come through via taxation, in all likelihood; however, that can only occur with support from the community members themselves that would have to be in agreement with such a proposed action. Overall, I think the extortion problem is avoided if community input is at the center of the decision-making process. Like most similar issues, a "majority rules" system would have to apply here as well, in my opinion.

Obviously, as we've harped on quite a bit, the funding aspect of this potential service is the primary point of concern. Much more research and outreach must be conducted to properly assess how to provide such a service that is beneficial to the people in the community and the libraries.

ianbuchanan
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Post by ianbuchanan » 14 May 2018, 15:18

ianbuchanan wrote:
14 May 2018, 15:10
DATo wrote:
14 May 2018, 06:54
ianbuchanan wrote:
08 May 2018, 16:40

Thank you very much for sharing your opinions and concerns! I hear them loud and clear. Before I address some of the topics you bring up here, I will say that the original idea has shifted from one that charges the end reader to a model that works alongside and on behalf of libraries to be the book delivery service provider. As a result, books would remain free to library members, whether they are delivered or not. Of course, this requires, if this idea is to be turned into a business, for libraries themselves to pay the company directly, as compensation for the value-added service it would provide to their members. While this would require a likely increase in funding to accomplish long-term, ample research has shown that increased usage of libraries, a pattern this idea would almost certainly create, results in increased public funding being directed to public libraries, which would optimally benefit libraries and the delivery service-providing company who generates revenue from these publicly funded libraries. If increased taxes to fund such a program would result, which is not or ever will be a goal, I think, any initiative that benefits community members, in this case granting wider-spread access to books, would we generally well received. Of course, taxes are taxes, and they are rarely taken lightly, which is why raising taxes to fund the service is not desired nor is it part of the idea.

To touch on your sentiment towards laziness and its increasing prevalence among consumers...I agree, as a character trait, it is deplorable. However, today, with time being of such importance, why not save it whenever possible. Wouldn't you rather enjoy your time with family or experiences than traveling to the library? I would strongly hesitate to even really consider a preference for delivery over in-store shopping lazy at all. We all want to save time, so why not do it when we can? It's the only thing in life we cannot get more of so we must protect it when the opportunity arises.

Please let me know what you think about my comments, I'm very interested in continuing a discussion and appreciate your insights very much. Thanks again for sharing your thoughts!
If those who choose to have books, groceries, or anything else delivered to their homes are willing to pay the entire cost for this added service then I have no argument with such a plan. My complaint, and I think it is a valid one, consists with the involuntary participation of people who do not wish to participate in such a plan being forced to under duress ... I consider this a form of extortion.

Any increase in taxes for a library delivery service would normally be obtained as a result of a voter bond issue. If the citizens in my community would vote for such a service who am I to say ney? Frankly, I have a truly excellent library system where I live and I would be among the first to help support it, but I feel that a delivery service is not something important enough to warrant an increase in taxes or other costs to ALL library patrons. If people need more time for their families as you suggest in your reply I would suggest that they contract with a courier service to pick up library materials to be delivered to their homes and pay the cost for delivery themselves. I do not feel that I should have to pay for augmenting their allowance of valuable time. It is a personal issue which involves their own personal issues and convenience, not mine.
Right, I see what you are saying. There shouldn't be a tax on imposed on community members that don't see any benefit from the delivery service personally. To that extent, I'd agree. The only problem, and it is a rather large one, is that library resources are, for all intents and purposes, meant to be provided to community members free of charge. Thus, charging just those that use the service, which does make the most sense from a business perspective, is not likely to be feasible within library systems' guiding policies.

Therefore, in order for a delivery service to be implemented, its funding would likely have to come from its apportionment from the state and/or work to similar to a pay-per-use model, in which scenario the library system agrees to pay the delivery service provider based on the added usage it generates of library material. Yes, I agree that some funds would have to come through via taxation, in all likelihood; however, that can only occur with support from the community members themselves that would have to be in agreement with such a proposed action. Overall, I think the extortion problem is avoided if community input is at the center of the decision-making process. Like most similar issues, a "majority rules" system would have to apply here as well, in my opinion.

Obviously, as we've harped on quite a bit, the funding aspect of this potential service is the primary point of concern. Much more research and outreach must be conducted to properly assess how to provide such a service that is beneficial to the people in the community and the libraries.
The question really becomes, "Can we implement this service in a way that makes the people, library system, and service provider better off?" And to that extent, I am not sure if there truly is a way to do so. Is demand for such a service great enough to garner enough support and funding to be directed to the service provider that enables them to profitably implement the delivery service? At this point, this is unknown.

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Post by palilogy » 11 Jun 2018, 20:53

I never have any issues because I almost always get my books used and then there inexpensive and are delivered right to the door. Hmmmm unless they were college books. Then I had too spend too much money that I never got back because they were awful books I often didn't want to keep.

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Post by ianbuchanan » 12 Jun 2018, 17:22

palilogy wrote:
11 Jun 2018, 20:53
I never have any issues because I almost always get my books used and then there inexpensive and are delivered right to the door. Hmmmm unless they were college books. Then I had too spend too much money that I never got back because they were awful books I often didn't want to keep.
Thanks for sharing! Where do you get your used books from?

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Post by palilogy » 13 Jun 2018, 21:12

I get most of my books from book sales at libraries- but I do also check amazon from time to time. Book sales are a rush though I love going to them =)

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Post by ianbuchanan » 14 Jun 2018, 10:35

palilogy wrote:
13 Jun 2018, 21:12
I get most of my books from book sales at libraries- but I do also check amazon from time to time. Book sales are a rush though I love going to them =)
Very cool! Do you go to these sales often? How much do you usually pay per book? I'd imagine it's relatively cheap.

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Post by palilogy » 14 Jun 2018, 10:47

When I lived in NY there were sales every week, I was surrounded by large libraries. The prices were great too usually 5 dollars a bag. I recently moved to NC and I'm going to my first "southern book sale" in a week. I'm hoping it will be good, there are not too many down here =(

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Post by ianbuchanan » 15 Jun 2018, 10:42

palilogy wrote:
14 Jun 2018, 10:47
When I lived in NY there were sales every week, I was surrounded by large libraries. The prices were great too usually 5 dollars a bag. I recently moved to NC and I'm going to my first "southern book sale" in a week. I'm hoping it will be good, there are not too many down here =(
Those are great prices! Sounds exciting! How do you get your books in the meantime?

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Post by Eclectic_novels » 21 Jun 2018, 00:37

Wow to be surrounded by Libraries, how wonderful that would be.

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Post by Kelsey anne » 21 Jun 2018, 00:48

This is a great idea and I would defiantly be interested in a service like this. The only problem that I would have with this is returning the books because I always want to keep the books I have read. This is a very innovative idea but personally I would give costumers the option to borrow or purchase books. This way people will be able to read the books they desire for a low fee or purchase books to add to their collection.

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Post by ianbuchanan » 21 Jun 2018, 18:35

Eclectic_novels wrote:
21 Jun 2018, 00:37
Wow to be surrounded by Libraries, how wonderful that would be.
Right! The idea is to bring the library to you!

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Post by ianbuchanan » 21 Jun 2018, 18:39

Kelsey anne wrote:
21 Jun 2018, 00:48
This is a great idea and I would defiantly be interested in a service like this. The only problem that I would have with this is returning the books because I always want to keep the books I have read. This is a very innovative idea but personally I would give costumers the option to borrow or purchase books. This way people will be able to read the books they desire for a low fee or purchase books to add to their collection.
I see what you mean, thanks for sharing! I don't think this service would really apply to buying books, however, just because Amazon and many other competitors have been able to deliver purchased books, and have done it so effectively for so long, it would be hard to compete with them directly. By focusing just on delivering rental library books, we have a solid chink of the reading market and can look to take a strong hold of it and hopefully convert purchasers into borrowers if that fits their lifestyle!

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Post by StephanieCorinne22 » 23 Jun 2018, 13:37

Definitely cost. I try to get as many books as I can from thrift stores, used book stores and the occasional library used book sales.

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Post by StephanieCorinne22 » 23 Jun 2018, 13:39

Personally, I like to own the books. I do get books from the library occassionally, but overall, I like to own them. Your idea would definitely help get me thinking more about "renting" books and may be a good option for people who like to do that. I would consider giving it a try!

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