Tell me about that feeling you get when you finish a book.

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Amber9731
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Tell me about that feeling you get when you finish a book.

Post by Amber9731 » 12 Jun 2015, 21:30

You know that feeling your get when you finish a really good book? You know what i mean, the "my life has changed" feeling? Well, I have that times 12. I just completed the Bloodlines series by Richelle Mead. This series itself has 6 books and the series that preludes it is another 6 books. I have spent a good part of 6 weeks in the world of Vampire Academy and Bloodlines. I find myself reflecting on everything that has happened to the characters and can't help smiling when I think of how the books ended. Please, tell me about some of your experiences with the feeling you get after you finish a book.
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Post by DATo » 12 Jun 2015, 21:54

I prefer one great book, like, To Kill A Mockingbird, to serials. But I know what you're saying and I'm sure the feeling is the same.

I think, for me anyway, when the final lines of a great book are coming to a close it's like the moment before saying goodbye to a dear friend that you know you will never see again. I can't count the number of times I've wished I could read a book I really loved over again for the first time.
“I just got out of the hospital. I was in a speed reading accident. I hit a book mark and flew across the room.”
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Post by PashaRu » 12 Jun 2015, 22:07

DATo wrote:I think, for me anyway, when the final lines of a great book are coming to a close it's like the moment before saying goodbye to a dear friend that you know you will never see again. I can't count the number of times I've wished I could read a book I really loved over again for the first time.
I remember when I read David Copperfield for the first time. I developed, not just a liking for several of the characters, but an affection for them. And when I finished the book, I missed them. It was as if we had parted and I would never see them again. I had a strange, empty feeling for a few days afterward. It was quite a singular experience.
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DATo
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Post by DATo » 12 Jun 2015, 22:29

PashaRu wrote:
DATo wrote:I think, for me anyway, when the final lines of a great book are coming to a close it's like the moment before saying goodbye to a dear friend that you know you will never see again. I can't count the number of times I've wished I could read a book I really loved over again for the first time.
I remember when I read David Copperfield for the first time. I developed, not just a liking for several of the characters, but an affection for them. And when I finished the book, I missed them. It was as if we had parted and I would never see them again. I had a strange, empty feeling for a few days afterward. It was quite a singular experience.
Copperfield is one of my most beloved books. I can TOTALLY relate to what you are saying. Dickens' characters were so unbelievably real that it is almost impossible for me to accept that they did not exist at one time. McCawber, and the most loyal wife in literature, Mrs. McCawber; Tommy Traddles; the woman I would not have been so stupid to ignore - AGNES !!!l; Aunt Betsy (I had an aunt like her); dear dear Pegotty; yes, and even Uriah Heep. These are people who never lived, and yet, they will never die. Mr. Dick is still writing his memorial, Aunt Betsey - shooing away donkeys, and Mr. Mell -showing kindness to the unloved. Bless them all !

EDIT: Did you know that David Copperfield was the book Dickens himself thought was his best, and the one he most loved? It certainly shows in his writing of it. I also think it was the best thing he'd ever written, and in his case that's saying a lot.
“I just got out of the hospital. I was in a speed reading accident. I hit a book mark and flew across the room.”
― Steven Wright

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Post by annarocher » 12 Jun 2015, 23:16

If the book is truly inspirational, full of emotion and deep human connection, I do end up feeling a strong sense loss. I also feel happiness too because I've read another piece of someone's view on life, their hardships, and (mosly) graduated outcomes. My struggle is that I'd like to continue reading about them til they grow old, see all their grandchildren, and peacefully pass. Im always wanting to know the rest of their story and continue on that imaginary connection created by a talented author.

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Post by Amber9731 » 13 Jun 2015, 10:21

annarocher wrote:My struggle is that I'd like to continue reading about them til they grow old, see all their grandchildren, and peacefully pass. Im always wanting to know the rest of their story and continue on that imaginary connection created by a talented author.
I think this right here is the reason that I love books that are part of a series so much! I always want to know what happens next!
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Post by gingerbabe_12 » 13 Jun 2015, 13:45

When I finish a book, if the book is a something that I really enjoyed and it was a book I was thinking about when I wasn't reading it than when I finish it I usally feel really disaointed that I'm done reading it at the same time that I feel happy about the end if it is a satisfying end if it is not then I am just disapointed. I usally like reading book series so when I finish a series I usally am sad because then Im done with that whole plot line.

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Post by Sabriel8 » 14 Jun 2015, 07:55

I agree with ginger (previous poster). Coming to the end of a good book leaves a hollow space in the next couple of days, until a new story arrives to take its place. While less-than-stellar works are concluded with more relief than regret, finishing a good book is like loosing a friend: fond memories will tide you over, but the characters, plot, and underlying devices no longer evolve to delight and surprise you. The only balm is to find the sequel.

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Post by inlovewithbooks » 18 Jun 2015, 18:15

I read all the Harry Potter books one summer after the last book in the series was released. I had ignored all my friend's pleads to read the books because I thought they were going to be very childish and boring. What finally got me to read the series where the mobs of people fighting to get a copy of the last book at the stores. That summer I became so obsessed with the books that I read non-stop until I finished the whole series. I think I was the only kid holed-up indoors all summer long. After reading the last line of Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows my heart sank and I felt like I had just lost my best friend. I wanted more Harry, what would I do without him....I was pretty pathetic. It took a while to get over that. LOL
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Post by Ammonia » 23 Jun 2015, 22:54

Well, it depends on the book, but I mostly get a mixture of several feelings.
I feel content with myself that I have finally got to the finish line, I sigh and take in all the information I've learned up to that point all at once. I feel overwhelmed by everything for several moments and then I start feeling kind of down - the book has ended and my journey with the characters has ended. If it's a series - I feel restless about the chance to pick up the next book. If it's not, I'm just kind of sad that it's over.

Overall, it's a bittersweet kind of a feeling - negative emotions mixed up with positive ones.

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Post by moffatballerina » 23 Jun 2015, 23:37

Some books, I think, are more likely to give a significant feeling than others, and among those books the feeling will differ. Most recently, though, I got it from Go Ask Alice, and it was one of the "I see the world differently, I see people differently, and my decisions will be affected by this from now on" things. It's even more jarring because, of course, you become attached to the characters you're reading, and this girl was a real person who struggled with her life and died. I think that fact about doubled the intensity of the book's impact.

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Post by Paulafer120 » 24 Jun 2015, 00:06

I get the feeling of satisfaction having completed said book but at the same time I get depressed because I wasn't done living in that world any book that is powerful to get any emotional response from me (crying, laughing, anger, etc.) is usually good enough to make me forget that it's just a story.

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Post by Cee-Jay Aurinko » 24 Jun 2015, 03:03

Well, I can tell you what it feels like to finish a big book, like say, over 700 pages. Or an entire trilogy or series. It feels like finishing Rome. Like the ending of a marathon, and coming in first. Like landing on earth after jumping (sky diving) out of a plane from an impossible height. Like flying. Like like like winning.
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Post by Bookloversunite » 24 Jun 2015, 03:44

If it was an exceptional book then I feel drawn out of my fantasy and dragged back to reality. I feel like I have made a best friend. Lucky I can always go back to it.

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Post by StoneRyno » 24 Jun 2015, 23:21

I think for me what I feel is whatever the tone of the book was. Like "Where the Red Fern Grows" I was sad and cried but also inspired by the strength of the family. If it is a hero centered book: Percy Jackson and the Olympians series or The Lord of the Rings, I am excited by the adventure and delighted with the triumph of the hero. Suspense, thriller, and mystery books depends on how they end. For example Steven King's "It", the story was interesting and suspenseful but the end was kind of disappointing. So I felt disappointed.

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