How much reading is too much reading?

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CorrinneMcMahon
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How much reading is too much reading?

Post by CorrinneMcMahon »

As a child I was always told to get my "head out of books and into the real world" by unfavorable family members. I know of a teenage boy who barely reads unless it is for school and spends his weekends from the time he wakes up to the time he sleeps, mostly playing Minecraft on his laptop.

Has the world gone mad? In my opinion that is MUCH more damaging. Talk about brain rot!

I also know of a woman who spends all of her time reading even though she has housework to be done and children to look after.

Reading promotes creativity and out of the box thinking. It broadens our understanding of the world, expands our vocabulary, improves our writing ability and can help develop analytical thinking.

Looking back on what I was told as a child compared to a lack of enthusiasm from a lot (not all) kids today, is there such a thing as too much reading? Or should we be encouraging our children to unplug and and pick up a book more often? How much is too much, in your opinion where is the happy medium?

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Moneco
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Post by Moneco »

Its never enough in my opinion. I sometimes stay up till 3 in the morning reading. Always read, knowledge is power.

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CorrinneMcMahon
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Post by CorrinneMcMahon »

Me to! I say I am going to bed early, plan on reading a couple of chapters and then before I know it it's 1 am and I am halfway through the book! In the examples of the people I gave above though, I think both could be seen as "unhealthy." I honestly don't know how to get that boy off the laptop. He throws a hissy fit anytime someone suggests he does something else. If he was my child I think i would be limiting the amount of time he is playing. For me as a child and now as an adult- I would much rather read for a few hours than play a video game.

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LivreAmour217
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Post by LivreAmour217 »

I personally cannot get enough of reading. However, the example that you gave about the woman who neglects her children and housework for reading is an extreme case. In my opinion, this is no worse than watching television or playing video games excessively. Anything causes someone to neglect his/her responsibilities is a problem.
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Post by Gustavsson »

It's too much reading if it starts to distract you from real life-relationships, responsibilities etc. But if it's just taking the place of other distractions, then it's not too much. If it's just amusement instead of obsession, it's not too much.

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Post by StarLight365 »

I do not feel there is such a thing as too much reading. Different people are different and some people can read a lot while others cannot read a lot. It is very difficult to set a specific time limit.

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Post by DATo »

I agree with LivreAmour217 and Gustavsson. When any pursuit of interest (not just book reading) begins to take precedence over the important responsibilities of our lives it is time to make some adjustments.
“I just got out of the hospital. I was in a speed reading accident. I hit a book mark and flew across the room.”
― Steven Wright

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Post by TLGabelman »

I am in no way saying that spending all day playing video games is a good thing, but before you dismiss Minecraft Ill share one of many articles I have read about it.

http://2machines.com/183040/

That being said I think anytime a person isolates from social experiences for long periods of time (whether through reading, video games or other things) they are missing out on a chance to build relationships and expand themselves socially. Personal responsibilities should take precedent, but I can admit to reading while I let the house work wait. I dont read for long periods of time and ignore my children though....
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Post by michelewhite0068 »

:?: I believe that one is reading too much if they are neglecting their responsibilities to themselves or others. It seems we live in a world where patience is almost non-existent because electronic devices are so immediately responsive and people in real life cannot respond like machines. What are your thoughts?
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Post by darkhuntress »

I really don't think you can read to much. You can only read to much if it starts taking over your everyday life suck as your job and responsibilities at home.
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Post by C S Harper »

There is definitely a line to be drawn here. One can never do too much of anything without there being some kind of repercussion. Children, should never just read books thereby not doing other creative things like sports, arts and crafts, going to museums or just anything sociable. Likewise, adults need variety as well. There are times when family need to come first.

Also, adults need to get out and be sociable and interact with other people. This provides a healthy, balanced
individual.There is definitely a balance that needs to be reached. Although I enjoy reading and wish that I could just do it all the time, I know that this is unrealistic. I do find lots of time to read, however. It is definitely how I prefer spending my downtime.

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Post by LunarLucy »

Like others have said, it comes down to balance. If your life and people around you suffer as you are always doing any one activity, whether that be reading, performing brain surgery or balancing fruit on your nose, it's not good. We need to move about and speak to people now and again.

I judge the amount of reading based on free time. People at my job check Facebook, etc, on their lunch breaks, whereas I have a book in my handbag. A friend told me she doesn't have time to read, but watches at least four hours of television an evening, whereas I maybe read for three hours and watch just one particular show a night. And it can never be a bad thing to use commuting time on public transport to read.

With kids, it's often the material. An lot of them became interested in books just because of J. K. Rowling, which is wonderful. We need more work that pulls them in voluntarily, rather than forcing them into it, possibly causing book-resentment later on.

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Post by gali »

It is all a matter of balance and priorities. If reading prevents one from doing other pursuits and causes him to neglect his family and duties, it is too much. I love to read and do read a lot, but my family comes first.
In the case of good books, the point is not to see how many of them you can get through, but rather how many can get through to you." (Mortimer J. Adler)

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Post by AuthorMeghan »

I think if you keep in mind your responsibilities and can balance life and books then you're fine. I love reading, but if my to-do list doesn't get done, I won't let myself read 'fun' books. Work and school take priority (being an adult sometimes sucks).

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Post by zeldas_lullaby »

When my dad was a kid, back in the '50's, he always wanted to stay inside and read. He was a bit of a brainiac in school. His mom, my late grandmother, insisted that he spend X hours a day outside playing with the neighborhood children, and then he could come in and read. I think she sensed that he was trying to avoid being social. So he did as he was told and everyone liked him, because he's that kind of person. Today, he's the most well-adjusted person I know, and he's astoundingly good at interacting with people. I guess that's all good, 'cause he's a successful discrimination/libel/slander/constitutional/employment/appeals lawyer, and people call him on the phone and stop by all the time, and he's always going to court or out to lunch with a client or colleague. In high school he was voted most witty, and his nickname was Pops, something that my sister and I never let him live down. "Hey, Pops!"

I guess the point is that vicarious living should be balanced with real living. They both have a place, though.

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