Cover for Misreading Judas

The First Ten Focus Group Feedback for Misreading Judas: How Biblical Scholars Missed the Biggest Story of All Time

Because Misreading Judas was Book of the Day, some of our most trusted members have carefully looked over the cover, the description, and other aspects of this book as a part of purchase-intent focus group. We then asked each participant in the focus group if they planned to buy and read the book, and why they planned to buy and read the book or not. Their answer to that question and reasons are displayed below. We call this awesome feature The First Ten Focus Group.

Keep in mind, the responses from the members are not reviews. This is purchase-intent focus group which means the participants are people who have NOT yet bought or read your book. A purchase-intent focus group is an important and extremely useful marketing tool for any product, not just books. For other products, you might walk on the street and show people an item in a package and poll them about whether they would buy if or $X or not. These kind of focus groups are one of the ways big marketing companies find the ideal price points for products and test the effectiveness of different packaging. The focus group can help you identify your market so you how to target ads of your book, and it can (but may not) provide you new useful info about your "packaging" (e.g. your book cover, your book synopsis on Amazon, etc.). The point of the focus group comments is to give you information from people who have not bought or read your book about why they plan to buy your book which will help you in marketing the book. These are not reviews or critiques of your book because they are not from people have read the book. This is a marketing tool, not reviews. The trick of book marketing and book advertising is that you have to convince people who have not read your book yet that your book is worth buying and reading. For marketing, it doesn't matter much if people love your book after reading it if you cannot convince potential buyers before they read it that they will love it.

IMPORTANT: Any score over 10% is considered very good. And any score above 0% is acceptable. This is because we only poll about 20 or so readers, and all readers have to say "no" to almost all books. Over a million books are published each year. Even a very active reader cannot come close to even reading 1% of books out there.

This is also why publishing books is such a tough industry.

gali

I wouldn't have sampled the book on my own, as I don't read religious-themed books. I didn't change my mind after sampling the book. While the blurb gave a good sense of the content, it isn't a topic that interests me. The book explores misconceptions, painting Judas as a hero, rather as a betrayer. I haven't heard about the gospel of Judas before, so I found the whole concept enlightening. The Kindle sample consisted just of reviews. Adding a bit of the book would have improved it. The paper version included some sections of the book, but the format wasn't very easy to the eyes. Although I really like the author's interpretation of the story of Judas, the sample didn't engage me. The quotes from the New Testament were another turn-off. The book appears to be well-written. I didn't notice any glaring errors, always a plus. I won't read the book, is it isn't a genre I enjoy reading. The official review didn't affect my decision.

First Ten review added on December 19, 2018, at 6:54 am by gali.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

sonya01

I have only recently become a reader of books that investigate religious doctrines, and so this one is quite appealing to me. The cover illustration and title suggest that therein lies a bigger secret, ready to be revealed which sparked my interest. Reviews, of which there are a few in the early pages of the book, are glowing and welcome Wahler’s alternative point of view. The caution is that this book may be rejected outright by traditionalists, which is sadly often the case. I am usually tongue-in-cheek about revelatory claims such as these, but nothing intrigues me more than to investigate them, so this book sounds very interesting to me. Most of the first ten pages consist of reviewers comments, and so it is hard to comment on the author’s writing. As far as I could tell, there were no errors in the text, pointing to evidence of thorough editing of the book. I like most the fact that the author has intertwined symbolism an mysticism into the traditional bible account, but perhaps claiming that Judas supplanted Jesus as the Messiah may be going a bit too far. In any case, an interesting read is promised, barring the author’s tendency towards presumptive statements and convoluted reasonings. This book would definitely make it to my bookshelves and be read in full, particularly as it is so short and intense.

First Ten review added on December 19, 2018, at 7:10 am by sonya01.
Do you plan to read the whole book? Yes!

Kendra M Parker

This is not a book that would easily appeal to me unless I was doing research on related topics. Reading the official review helped me to see that the author’s viewpoint is one that I would probably argue with heavily, which would not be my choice of book unless I needed a contrasting opinion for my research. The sample that I read was really only the introduction, as most of the sample was just other reviews of the book. The introduction was clear, concise, and well edited. I can appreciate the author’s assessment of NatGeo’s analysis of the original text being done by those who do not appreciate true Eastern gnosticsm, but I would also argue that the books that became the Bible became canon for a reason, especially since that canon was decided during the lifetime of the other disciples. I basically completely disagree with his thesis that the New Testament account in the canon is simply a fictional cover story and that these “long-lost” apocryphal texts are the real truth. I’m not that big on conspiracy theories like this. If this were a Kindle Ultimate book, I might be more likely to look further into this book to understand his case a bit more, but at $2.99, I think that’s a bit much to buy a book I’m going to spend all my time arguing with.

First Ten review added on December 19, 2018, at 9:01 am by Kendra M Parker.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

lesler

Looking at the cover, I love what this book might be, and want to read it. Reading the sample, I liked all the blurbs and explanations about what the story will be, and still want to read it. This book appears to be professionally edited, with no grammatical errors or typos that I noticed. I liked the general premise of this book, and I also can't wait to read about the conversations between Judas and Jesus. We all know one conversation that happened, but there's got to be so much more. I did not like how I could not read any text at all in the sample-there were too many forwards and positive blurbs that I could not start the book. I look forward to reading the book.

First Ten review added on December 19, 2018, at 9:48 am by lesler.
Do you plan to read the whole book? Yes!

HRichards

I would not have picked this book up on my own, as it runs counter to my own religious beliefs. Having read the sample, I will not be continuing on with the book, as it does run counter to my religious beliefs. The sample is mostly positive printed reviews of the book and the introduction. The basis of the book centers around the Gnostic version of the story of Judas. The writing is very good and I didn't notice any grammar errors. Someone interested in broad religious investigation might like this book, but I am not going to agree with the content, therefore am not interested. I read the reviews that were part of the sample that were rather glowing, but no other reader reviews associated with this site.

First Ten review added on December 19, 2018, at 9:50 am by HRichards.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

Laura Bach

"Misreading Judas" is a book that lets the world know about Robert Wahler's discovery in the story between Judas and Jesus. We know that Judas betrayed Jesus, but Wahler searched the Gnostic tradition of Mastership succession and believes Judas was actually the one sacrificed . The Gospel of Judas was discovered in 2006. In the Contents section, the first chapter has a small error: "I The Gospel of JudaS". I wished the sample had fewer reviews of the book and more of the actual writing of the author. I merely read a few pages before the sample ended, so I couldn't make a true impression for myself and I was not intrigued by what I read. I wouldn't have tried this book without the program because I don't read religious books. I won't continue reading because of the same reason and because the sample didn't convince me.

First Ten review added on December 19, 2018, at 10:18 am by Laura Bach.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

Scerakor

From the cover, blurb, and review of this book, I wouldn’t have read it. I have no interest whatsoever in a comparative religious study and am not interested in whether or not the Judas story is accurate. After reading the first ten pages I didn’t change my mind and therefore will not be buying and reading the rest of this book. I like that this book is seemingly going to take a very academic approach. I appreciated the fact that the background was given about the 2006 acquisition to the rights of the Gnostic story of Judas. It was quickly show, as well, what the main point behind the book will be – that still no one reports that Judas, instead of Jesus, is the “sacrifice” that is supposed to be referenced. That being said, I really have no interest in this topic and therefore would not see any benefit in buying and reading the rest of this book. I didn’t see anything specific that I would have wanted to change within the sample that I read, but it did seem well written and edited. The official review did not affect my decision at all.

First Ten review added on December 19, 2018, at 10:22 am by Scerakor.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

Camille Turner

I would have sampled this book even without the program because the subject (which is made clear by the cover, title, and Amazon blurb) of Judas interests me. As an atheist, I'm interested from a historical and literary point of view. After reading the sample, I believe the book to be professionally edited as I didn't see any errors. I liked all of the positive reviews of the book, and I was interested in the initial claims of the author that the Gospel of Judas has not been thoroughly examined and correctly interpreted since its discovery. As such, my impression has stayed the same, and I'm still interested in the book. I wouldn't improve anything, except maybe including a longer sample so readers get to see more before they buy. Though interested in the book, I won't be buying it today as I have so many other things on my to-read list to finish.

First Ten review added on December 19, 2018, at 10:32 am by Camille Turner.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

cpru68

The sample pages of this are mainly reviews of the book with very little content to explore. However, I understand that the topic of this book is to strip away the long held belief that Judas was merely a betrayer to Jesus for a few pieces of silver. The author has used the lost and found gnostic writings to examine and show that what we thought was true has been convoluted to spread a message that is based on falsehoods and inaccurate teachings. The official review was helpful for gathering further insight into this book because, like I said, the entire sample gives more of a critique of the book versus information. I found that to be a drawback for the opening as my job is to read the first ten pages. And while I get a sense of what the book entails, I didn’t feel like I was getting to know the author. I was being exposed to other people’s impressions of the material instead of hearing what the writer had to say. So, one suggestion I would make would be to let the book speak for itself. The title and the cover are going to rouse either inquiry or irritation, but once a reader is looking at the first page, he or she is then met with a review instead of the content. I found one error with spacing in 8 percent of the sample, which ironically is in one of the reviews of the book. “Some of his answers to these questions are revolutionary; for instance, he contends...” There is too much space after the word revolutionary and the punctuation. Other than that, I did not see any other errors and the review indicated it was professionally edited.

I probably would not have found this title on my own to read without the book club. I do read non-fiction but generally true life stories that are inspiring. So, I am passing on this one due to the fact that it seems too heavy into theology versus first hand spiritual experiences. I have found that people are always going to have varying viewpoints on politics and religion. It’s good to have discussions about it, however, personal experiences such as miracles with the spiritual realm intrigue me more instead of
debating over the Bible and who is right. With that in mind, I won’t be finishing this one.

First Ten review added on December 19, 2018, at 10:37 am by cpru68.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

OloladeO

Based on the cover and title, I would not have read the sample because it clashes with my beliefs in every way. From the sample, the author states that no one, whether scholar or layperson, has presented the correct reading of the gospel of Judas until now. The reason is that western education is sorely lacking the teaching of mysticism. Dr. Lance Jenott has one of the latest translations of the gospel of Judas. The author gives proof from the gnostic texts that James was 'Judas'- both sacrifice and master. The book seems well edited. The OBC reviewer gave it a perfect rating, but I am not interested in reading this book as I stated earlier.

First Ten review added on December 19, 2018, at 12:16 pm by OloladeO.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

desantismt_17

This book’s title didn’t hook me. The description caught my interest a bit, especially the idea of looking at the Jesus/Judas story through a lens of Eastern mysticism. Still, this book didn’t seem like something I’d want to read in its entirety. Before sampling, I wasn’t thinking about reading. After sampling, I’ll pass. The book appears professionally edited. I noticed no errors. Despite the weight of this topic and the critical nature of this book, I found the writing to be almost conversational and easy to follow. I have some, but not much, familiarity with the story of Judas, but this did not keep me from understanding. The author presents information in a timely, clear manner. The questions raised in this book are perhaps groundbreaking, and I felt myself wondering as I read. I may have detected some accusatory undertones toward Christian scholars, but it didn’t strike me as overwhelming. I have no improvements to suggest at this time. The OnlineBookClub.org review I saw was glowing. This just isn’t my kind of book.

First Ten review added on December 19, 2018, at 12:53 pm by desantismt_17.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

cristinaro

If it hadn't been for the first ten program, I wouldn't have sampled this book since I wasn't planning on reading a book challenging religious issues. Although I like the cover and title, I am not exactly sure the author has the necessary expertise to objectively analyze and interpret the gnostic Gospel of Judas. For the sake of argument, his ideas are interesting and make us reconsider the traditional story of Judas' betrayal and Jesus' sacrifice. With good editorial reviews, but only 2 customer reviews, the book could become the reason for heated debates both among Christian believers and scholars. Unfortunatelly, the sample is very short and I could not decide whether the book is worth reading or not. Despite the sample's brevity, I noticed two unnecessary commas: "It is the gnostic (,) or mystic (,) tradition alone that is important." (loc. 91% of Sample). The official OBC review sheds a lot of light on the author's purpose and message of the book. I am still not tempted to read the book, but I'll keep in mind the idea of James (Judas) succeeding Jesus as Master in a neverending cycle.

First Ten review added on December 19, 2018, at 2:02 pm by cristinaro.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

Sarah_Khan

I would not have picked up this book if it was not part of the first ten program because I do not read books about religion. I was a bit disappointed at the free sample. The book starts with way too many reviews, which leaves space for only a few pages of the actual book. I have to admit even though this book is well-edited, it is written for people that already know a lot about the whole Jesus and Judas story, so unfortunately I was left confused. I do not intend to read the rest because this is just not my type of book. I did not feel the need to read any OBC review.

First Ten review added on December 19, 2018, at 2:48 pm by Sarah_Khan.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

Kajori50

'Misreading Judas' by Robert Wahler is a book that gives a different perspective on the story of Judas. The title, blurb, the OBC review, and the customer reviews in Amazon did a good job of convincing me to give the book a try.

The sample the book leads me to believe that it gives an in-depth analysis of the story of Jesus. I like how the author gives a different perspective to an existing religious text. I have to mention that I found a few errors. For example, the sentence construction is faulty in the sentence, “All one needs to recognise it is these long lost texts..” This leads me to believe that this book was not professionally edited. Though I like the concept of the book, I will skip it for now as I am not in the mind-frame to read such a serious book at this moment.

First Ten review added on December 19, 2018, at 3:17 pm by Kajori50.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

CataclysmicKnight

I'm not particularly part of any religion, but if I were to consider myself anything it would be Christian. It's always tough for me to read anything that goes against widely accepted beliefs of any religion, but that's especially true with Christianity. As such, a book like this wouldn't have interested me, and I wouldn't have looked into it if it wasn't the book of the day.

I threw caution to the wind and decided to check out the sample, figuring maybe it would change my mind... But it's not really a sample at all. In fact, the Amazon sample is nothing but the cover, some selected reviews, the title, copyright info and things of that sort. Nothing of the actual book is here aside from at least one quote in one of the reviews, not even a table of contents. This makes it essentially impossible to comment on this book from the sample, although I did garner a bit more information about the book's concept than I had from the Amazon description. I also found a single error in one of the reviews: an unnecessary space before a semicolon.

As this sample hasn't given me an opportunity to read any of the author's writing, and I wasn't interested in the book to begin with, I haven't changed my mind.

First Ten review added on December 19, 2018, at 3:40 pm by CataclysmicKnight.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

Yolimari

I like reading books about religious investigations sometimes, so I might have sampled this book on my own. The OBC review convinced me to read the book. The author’s theory about Judas being the successor of Jesus sounded fascinating. After I read the sample pages, I thought the book was professionally edited. I liked that the book has received positive reviews. I also liked that the author based his theory on the Gospel of Judas,which was found not long ago. Eventually, I will read this book because I want to learn about the relationship between Gnosticism and the Gospel of Judas.

First Ten review added on December 19, 2018, at 4:00 pm by Yolimari.
Do you plan to read the whole book? Yes!

britt13

I directed a play called "The Last Days of Judas Iscariot" which is centered around the court trial of Judas in the afterlife. I had to do a lot more research on the subject than my Sunday School days had taught me. The official review made this book sound really interesting! I was excited to read the first ten pages. First and foremost I hate all the reviews at the start. I always find that to be annoying and it comes off as a show-off author to me. I found the text to be a bit wordy, but that is understandable because of the subject matter. I found no errors but was not a big fan of Wahler's tone. He may very well be right that people have been misinterpreting the story (I wholeheartedly believe that is the case with much of the Bible) but it comes off, just as with having the reviews, showy. I will not be reading further because of my dislike of the tone.

First Ten review added on December 19, 2018, at 4:46 pm by britt13.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

sarahmarlowe

The cover certainly attracted my attention. I am curious about fresh readings of The Bible. After reading the sample, however, I don't think I would be interested in this book. (In honest disclosure, my sample was made up mainly of reviews.) I was thinking that this book would be a different perspective of the New Testament scriptures, not a look at gnosticism and Eastern mysticism. The sample I read was very well-edited. I haven't read an OBC review.

First Ten review added on December 19, 2018, at 5:17 pm by sarahmarlowe.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

FictionLover

I would have sampled this book without the program. The title is interesting and the cover makes it pretty clear that this is a non-fiction title about the Biblical figure of Judas. I am open to new interpretations of the bible. I have wondered about Judas' role in Christianity and wanted to get an idea of why we are misreading Judas. However the sample itself (after reviews) was too short for me to have an opinion. Though I have previously read about the Dead Sea Scrolls and the Gnostic tradition, there was not enough of Mr. Whaler's interpretation to make me want to read this. It does seem professionally edited, but there is not enough there to hook me.

First Ten review added on December 19, 2018, at 10:16 pm by FictionLover.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

Sahani Nimandra

Misreading Judas by Robert Wahler is a read that analyses the unseen hidden agendas of the relationship between Jesus and Judas. The sample consists of only 3 pages on text about this read which is difficult to determine anything about this read. There weren't any hindrance while reading, considering the available 3 pages. The official review is informative, and shows the side that general readers may wish to ignore. But this isn't my genre of interest, therefore, I don't wish to pursue it further.

First Ten review added on December 19, 2018, at 10:23 pm by Sahani Nimandra.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

Jsovermyer

The cover and title of the book, Misreading Judas by Robert Wahler, interested me and made me want to read it. The official review rated this book highly but warned that it was complicated and took a lot of effort and concentration to read. I found that to be true. Although I very much wanted to understand, I had a difficult time fully grasping what the author was saying. I felt that if I knew more about Gnostics and Eastern spiritual teaching, then I might have been better prepared. Wahler refers to the Gospel of Judas comparing it to what is said in the New Testament of the Bible. I think to get the most out of this book, you would need to have these other books available to compare line by line. This is fascinating material and the book has been professionally edited. I was able to download a free copy of the book and I think that sometime soon I will again attempt to read it to completion.

First Ten review added on December 19, 2018, at 10:41 pm by Jsovermyer.
Do you plan to read the whole book? Yes!

psychopathycathy

If I had not read the sample I would not have read the book as I do not read religious texts. After reading the sample, I have not changed my mind for the same reason. The sample was also very short because the beginning was testimonials. I also think the introduction was quite nuanced, and therefore a little confusing for me as I do not really have much background knowledge. It was professionally edited. I did not read the official review but that did not affect my decision.

First Ten review added on December 19, 2018, at 10:41 pm by psychopathycathy.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

LV2R

I am not interested in the book’s cover or title. The Amazon Blurb mentions that the author claims that Jesus didn’t die to save anyone and that Judas (James the Just) was the first-century savior. This turned me off completely. The sample was mostly reviews of the book with very little actual pages of the book. The author states that the experts chosen to analyze the Gnostic story of Judas were not best suited for the task. It is hard to tell if the book was edited well or not, but I did not notice any errors from the author in the sample. If I had to mention what I liked best about the first ten pages, it would be that the author thoroughly did his research on a Gnostic piece of ancient writing, which would have taken a lot of effort. I think it would have been better to have more of the author’s writing in the sample and not just the reviews. The OBC review mentioned that the author claims that no one has correctly translated the Gospel of Judas until his research. This is quite a claim and to me, it is very descriptive of a cult. I do not want to read this book because I believe very strongly that Jesus Christ is the true Savior and Messiah of the world. He died on the cross for all our sins and was buried and rose to life. I am not looking for any other Savior, for He is enough for me.

First Ten review added on December 19, 2018, at 11:10 pm by LV2R.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

CinWin

The cover of "Misreading Judas" by Robert Wahler was wonderful I definitely would have checked this book out because of that. I read the first 10 pages and was struck by the highly intellectual discourse in the book. The author argues that in the past, Judas was highly misunderstood and speaks of the Gospel Of Judas in much detail. I enjoyed the educational aspects of the book but I won't be finishing it as I religious books are my least favorite genre.

First Ten review added on December 19, 2018, at 11:30 pm by CinWin.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

ladycraic

I would have chosen to sample Misreading Judas apart from First Ten. I was intrigued by the title due to it's relevance to my personal beliefs. As a Christian, I was not turned away by the title, but more so taken aback. The reason for my nonchalance stems down to the fact that I believe a few concepts in Christianity can be "misread" by the majority - that is no surprise to me. I was interested to view the author's work! I actually opted to read the official OBC review before I sampled the book, and I was a bit turned away by the author's focus on "succession of Masters". Nonetheless, going on to read the first few pages, Misreading Judas intrigued me. I've heard a bit about gnostic writings but I've never strived to learn more. With my belief in the whole truth being revealed in the Word of God alone with no assistance from other texts, I'm not sure how much of this book I will actually accept. Still, I'm very interested in the work the author has presented. Due to the fact that I think I have more demanding projects to take heed to, I will have to pass on this book for now. This book seemed professionally edited and I didn't notice any grammatical errors.

First Ten review added on December 20, 2018, at 12:30 am by ladycraic.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

va2016

The cover and title are very indicative of the theme of the book. There are only two Amazon customer reviews of the book. The Amazon summary is a bit philosophical with several references to the New Testament sayings. I would have chosen to sample the book based on the theme of the book, as I am interested in the background of the religions and mysticism. As I sampled through the book, I found several nice reviews provided by various book review firms. I also got the glimpse of a portion of the first chapter. As I was very impressed by what is written in the foreword reviews, I am going to read the book in full. I found the book to be professionally edited. I didn't find any grammatical or mechanical errors. What I liked most about the book is its theme. I could not find anything that could be improved with the book. Although I found one OBC review that gave 4 out of 4 stars rating for the book, my decision to read the book in full is based on my own sampling.

First Ten review added on December 20, 2018, at 1:46 am by va2016.
Do you plan to read the whole book? Yes!

SamSim

I went directly to the sample, so I'll discuss that first. I'm 3 or more pages in, and all I'm reading are reviews. Why are there so many reviews in the front of this book? I understand the value of including excerpts from glowing reviews at the beginning of a book, as that may be as far as someone pages through while book shopping, but this is excessive. I appreciate that it includes the not-so-positive comments, though. I don't know if I should be including errors found in these reviews as part of my first-10 review, because these errors are presumably not those of Wahler himself, but in one review, the book title is not italicized. The use of quotation marks in and around the review excerpts is inconsistent. As far as the content that I will apparently reach in this book, it's interesting. I don't know anything about the "Gospel of Judas." The review included from "Foreward Reviews" makes me question the overall integrity of this book. Wahler is described as as a "lay researcher," and the quotes pulled from the book sound a bit like megalomania, such as saying this book's claims "will be the standard in due time." Scholars, especially Biblical scholars, no matter their "platform," should be humble and matter-of-fact in their approach. "Here's what I believe. Here's why I came to that conclusion." This allows the reader to arrive at their own conclusions from the text. Claiming that his conclusions must be accepted for progress to be made, even if it's true, undermines his overall goal and makes me less interested in whatever his conclusions are. Wow, the sample ends with the very short introduction. This is a weak, unproductive sample. It tells me what other readers thought of the work, which isn't even overwhelmingly positive. It feels like it's telling me what to think before I begin the actual book, then I only get to read the cryptic introduction before it abruptly ends. This is NOT selling it to me. As a Christian, the implication that Judas may have "betrayed" Jesus per Christ's own instruction doesn't really bother me. That would have been very "Christian" of Judas, actually, although they weren't using that title at the time. I have often wondered why modern Christians hate on Judas so much when the whole point of Christianity is that God has forgiven us and made a way to be reconciled to Him through the death and resurrection of Christ. Shouldn't we forgive Judas? Jesus would. Anyway, despite my new interest in the "Gospel" of Judas, I wouldn't read this particular book after this experience.

First Ten review added on December 20, 2018, at 8:27 am by SamSim.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

mtsnel006

I have read about Judas from the Bible before, so I would have chosen to read this book to find out what is being said about him. Having read the book and the review, I am planning on reading the book entirely to find out more about how he has been misinterpreted in the Church. Robert Wahler asserts that Judas never betrayed Jesus, but only followed a tradition called masterpiece succession. As an Eastern mysticism student, Wahler suggests that the story of Judas should have been interpreted through the lens of mysticism, that is, the practice of knowing through meditation and other spiritual ways. I liked that the author suggests another way of looking at some historical writings, and questioning the already existing notions. Of the first ten pages I read, I did not notice any editorial errors. I did not dislike anything about the sample or the review. Thanks.

First Ten review added on December 20, 2018, at 11:28 am by mtsnel006.
Do you plan to read the whole book? Yes!

ritah

The title and cover of this book roused my curiosity, based on that I would have sampled the book. After reading the official review, I sampled Misreading Judas. As someone who has read the Gospel of Judas and watched a documentary on the Gospel of Thomas, I'm really interested in the author's argument and understanding of the Gnostic texts.This is the main reason that I will be reading the book.I like that the book offers a counter-argument against what is largely accepted (that's not to say that I agree with the argument presented, just that I'm open to hearing it). I'd also like to find out how the author supports his claim that Judas and not Jesus was the "sacrifice" of "the man who bears me." Lastly, I did not find any obvious errors in the book.

First Ten review added on December 20, 2018, at 12:40 pm by ritah.
Do you plan to read the whole book? Yes!

Christina O Phillips

The title and cover are simple yet they caught my attention. While the tone and vocabulary of the summary was off-putting, the message still had my attention. Without this program, I would have read the sample. The book opened with large segments of reviews on the book; this made me less interested. I really just wanted to sample the text and did not care what others said about it! In the table of contents, Judas is typed as "JudaS" so that error bothered me. The only part of the book I got to read was the introduction which was short and critical of the people who had found Judas' gospel. I did not like the tone and I wish I could have read more of the actual text to get a better feel for the novel.

First Ten review added on December 20, 2018, at 4:53 pm by Christina O Phillips.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

micoleon13

While this is an interesting cover page, it's not one that appeals to me as it immediately looks like it centers around religion. The OnlineBookClub review was very complementary and outlined a book that varies greatly from long held beliefs about Judas and his relationship with Jesus. This book looks at the theory that Judas sacrificed himself as part of a Gnostic tradition. While I was a little more curious about it than I had been, it still did not change my original opinion. The pages which I read were well written and edited but I found that the foreword and consequent review excerpts dragged before getting to the introduction. While the author makes a valid point about the Christian scholars who analyzed the text were lacking in knowledge of the Gnostic traditions, it still isn't a topic which interests me. I will not be continuing to read this book and I have no ideas for improvement.

First Ten review added on December 20, 2018, at 6:19 pm by micoleon13.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

KRay93

The design of the cover is very well achieved considering that we are talking about a research book around religious themes, as the blurb proposes. The official review highlights that this short book gives volumes worth of sound comparative analysis, packed with quotations and line-by-line examination. The first ten pages start with an analysis of certain excerpts from the Gospel of Judas, where the author questions the interpretation of certain scholars around their meaning. The prose is appropriate for an informative book, while the editing work looks acceptable. Unfortunately, this kind of reading is not for someone like me, who doesn't find interest in a religious book that, in the face of so little concrete evidence, carries out an exercise of mere speculation. I will not continue reading this book.

First Ten review added on December 20, 2018, at 8:48 pm by KRay93.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

ReviewerDiksha

I like books like 'The Da Vinci Code', the ones that explore religious beliefs in new light. The title and cover of this book would have certainly attracted me had I seen it in a bookstore. However, I don't read non-fiction much, and from the looks of it, it seems a heavy read. I had not read any reviews of it, so I couldn't say anything for sure. The sample provided didn't have much of the actual book. Most of it was taken up by comments and praises from other sources. While I got what the book was about, I didn't actually get to read it enough to make up my mind, or to comment on its writing style and other features. In the small section that I read, I did not see any grammatical errors.

First Ten review added on December 20, 2018, at 11:41 pm by ReviewerDiksha.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

AA1495

Had I not sampled the book, I would not have read it. I usually read romance books. Further, from the title, a person would know that the book could be dealing with sensitive beliefs. Having read the sample, I felt like any reader would have to concentrate and read the book to be able to understand it. It is not an easy read. However, through the multiple quotes, the author's efforts are obvious. The book seems professionally edited. I am undecided on the book overall, but will not be buying it today.

First Ten review added on December 20, 2018, at 11:44 pm by AA1495.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

Fuzaila

Having little to no idea about Judas and Christianity, the cover and title failed to appeal me. Half of the sample were just reviews of the book and how Wahler has done a thorough research to come to his conclusions that Judas has been overlooked, which I liked and appreciated. There wasn't anything to dislike, but I had no idea what I was reading because christianity is foreign to me. The writing was crystal clear and edited professionally. I won't be reading this book and I think it won't appeal a wide audience.

First Ten review added on December 21, 2018, at 1:29 am by Fuzaila.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

Cher432

If I had not read the sample, I would not have read the book. This is because I am not really interested in christian mythology. There was an official onlinebookclub review but it did not change my mind. Reading the sample, it was interesting to note that the first assertion the author made was that the gospel of Judas had been misinterpreted. I would not buy and read the book as it did not interest me. I did not spot any typos so I think it was professionally edited.

First Ten review added on December 21, 2018, at 1:30 am by Cher432.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

ButterscotchCherrie

I might have sampled this without the programme because the information on the cover conveys that the book offers an alternative perspective on the usual stories about Christianity. I won't buy it today, however, because reading about Christianity isn't a top priority for me at the moment and I wouldn't have time to read an academic book. I didn't notice any errors in the sample, so the book appears professionally edited. I liked the fresh ideas about Christianity best, such as the implication that it might have roots in Eastern religions. The subjects of mastership succession, attaining higher consciousness through mental discipline and gnostic mysticism are intriguing to me. A possible improvement would be to include more of the substance of the book in the sample. The first ten pages were almost all taken up with reviews so that I didn't really get to sample the author's work at all. I didn't see an OnlineBookClub review, which didn't affect my decision.

First Ten review added on December 21, 2018, at 1:52 am by ButterscotchCherrie.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

Momiji1987

I must say, the reviews at the front of the book were very intriguing, however, I was disappointed that the sample ended before I got to read anything but the book’s title. The painting and the title both caught my eye because I’ve had an interest in “lost” texts for a while, but admittedly, find them hard to understand because I’m so new to the Bible as well. From what I gather from the review on Book Club, the author explains Gnosticism very well and claims Jesus wasn’t so special as to die for everyone, but simply passed his mantel onto Judas. This teaching is very different from anything in the Old Testament, let alone the New, so I’m not sure I’m convinced as to its authenticity based on what I know so far. Nevertheless, I love reading books like this because I learn new things and also get new ideas I can go to God and ask Him about, since ultimately, He is the great teacher. The book appears to be very professional and I didn’t notice any errors. I will add it to my list for future reading.

First Ten review added on December 21, 2018, at 2:02 am by Momiji1987.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

anneloretrujillo

I would not have sampled this book based on the genre, blurb, OBC review, title and cover. I don't usually read non-fiction books, and I rarely get into books about religion. After reading the sample, I won't be finishing this book. About 3/4 of the sample was just made up of lengthy reviews of the book from different sources. This was very disappointing. The small chunk of actual content just restated what was in the Amazon blurb by saying that the Book of Judas had been misinterpreted by the panel. Again, this information isn't really interesting to me, and there definitely wasn't enough content present in the sampled to change my mind. It did seem to be professionally edited.

First Ten review added on December 21, 2018, at 3:49 am by anneloretrujillo.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

Mercy Bolo

Judging by the cover, I wasn't going to read this book, but the OBC review urged me on when it mentioned that the author takes an interesting approach to the relationship between Jesus and Judas Iscariot. When I read the sample, I liked that the author included informative reviews at the beginning of the book, but I was disappointed that it is too short. The only thing I would change about the book is to include a few pages of the first chapter in the sample. Since I noticed no errors, I will conclude that the text underwent professional editing, but I won't read the rest of the book because it doesn't appeal to me.

First Ten review added on December 21, 2018, at 3:59 am by Mercy Bolo.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

Vickie Noel

Nothing on earth would have made me touch this book outside the First Ten program. The title conveyed all I needed to know about its contents, so I would simply have gone on my way. One thing I observed in the sample was that so called "praise" for the work dominated 90%, and the remainder was a meager 10% which still did not contain close to the meat of the argument. I felt that was a subtle plea for believability from the readers by showing evidence of those who have read and accepted its message. Granted, all books have this feature, but in a case like this when reachers need to quickly reach a conclusion whether or not to purchase the book, this isn't the right time to get a sample full of what other people think and not thick enough to ensure that more people get to read it and forge their own opinions. For the introductory part I read, I found the reasoning preposterous. First, the author mentioned that the gospel story of the Betrayal of Jesus was "fictional." But in the OBC review, the reviewer made me understand that the author didn't discredit the Bible or Jesus being a real master. So how come he interpreted a part of the Bible's account to be fictional, but goes on to accept the other parts? That sounds like confusion. Secondly, Wahler states that " when Jesus and Judas spoke together before the handover to Jewish leaders, their conversation concerned the personal sacrifice of Judas to become one with the master." What, then, was "Judas' sacrifice" to assist the master for when this same author and his gnostic teachings insist that "Jesus did not die for anybody's sin?" It's obvious that this is all mumbo-jumbo heresy, and I can't be bothered to read such. At least, grammatical errors were not included in the chaotic mix, thanks to the professional editor.

First Ten review added on December 21, 2018, at 4:22 am by Vickie Noel.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

Dolor

I wouldn't have chosen to read this book without The First Ten program because I found the topic debatable. It did not spark any interest in me. The cover depicts Judas hugging and kissing Jesus on a cheek along with a few people with them. There could have been better and more festive cover than this almost similar to a dirty-doodled cartoon photo. The sample only presented the reviewer's review of this book - not one page from the contents if this book was shared. Naturally, I can't find any error from the contents because nothing was given. The reviewers' reviews including the official OBC review of this book did not get me pulled into reading this one. I decide to bypass reading it. Misreading Judas by Robert Wahler is a #NonFiction book about #Religion, #Bible #Analysis, #Gnosticism, and #Mysticism. This is Wahler's detailed story of how the New Testament canonical 'Betrayal of Jesus' became the inversion of the gnostic mastership installation story of James the Just, first-century savior.

First Ten review added on December 21, 2018, at 4:34 am by Dolor.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

Theresam

I like the cover and title of this book. I would have picked this book up based on the cover alone. I haven’t read a review of this book yet. The idea that the religious scholars misread the story of Judas is an interesting premise. The author seems to have done a considerable amount of research into the writings of Judas. I believe this book was professionally edited because I didn’t see any errors. I would like to finish reading this book because I am intrigued by the subject matter and am
interested to learn about the research the author has conducted.

First Ten review added on May 1, 2019, at 6:18 am by Theresam.
Do you plan to read the whole book? Yes!

Stephanie Elizabeth

Normally, I would not read a book solely about religion because I have limited knowledge. I have chosen to read the rest of the book to expand my knowledge.
There are no errors, and my favorite part of the book is the author's findings. My least favorite part is the complicated text. The book has an official OnlineBookClub review.

First Ten review added on May 1, 2019, at 6:40 am by Stephanie Elizabeth.
Do you plan to read the whole book? Yes!

danielleamy

I would not have sampled this book if not for this first ten program. The cover looks like an old history book, so it was not eye-catching or appealing to me. After reading the Official review, I was not persuaded to read the whole book as it is not a genre I enjoy reading. I am not interested in Biblical history so I would not have selected this book to read for myself.
I did not see any typos or grammatical errors in the sample that I read.
I like that the book seems well-researched and according to the reviews cited in the introduction of the book, it has been well-received by reviewers. However, I was not tempted to buy the book after reading the first ten pages.

First Ten review added on May 1, 2019, at 8:34 am by danielleamy.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

srividyag1

The cover page and the title describes what is expected of this book. I read the review and found it to be thorough. This book deals with a controversial topic and scholars have argued about this for many centuries. When I read the sample, I found that the book examines the Gospel of Judas, translated based on a collection of gnostic texts discovered in Egypt in 1945. The sample in Amazon consists of the reviews in various publications and the introduction. From those pages, I gathered that the author's tone is academic. It reads like research. In the introduction, the author says that Judas has been misinterpreted and that mysticism or true gnosticism has been largely ignored in favour of biblical beliefs. The book seems well-edited. Since I do not prefer to read spiritual or religious books, I am not going to read this book.

First Ten review added on May 1, 2019, at 9:20 am by srividyag1.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

lisalynn

The cover of Misreading Judas features an intricate stained glass panel, beautiful if not very colorful, and accurately represents the genre of this book. Judas is a well-known villain in the Christian narrative, so any title that promises to examine his role in the events surrounding Christ is intriguing. The first ten pages promise a scholarly evaluation of the theory that Judas wasn't the traitor he's made out to be. Personally, religious studies aren't the kinds of books that interest me, but for people who like to argue about history and theology, here's some good fodder. I didn't see any errors. No OnlineBookClub review influenced me.

First Ten review added on May 1, 2019, at 10:03 am by lisalynn.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

TuyetMai

I wouldn’t have read this book if it wasn’t for the program because I’m not interested in theses and Gnostic views of religious texts. There’s a lot of featured praises for the book. However, I couldn’t read the actual writing as the sample doesn’t go past the reviews. I won’t buy this book basing on just those good reviews, given my lack of interest. The book appears well-edited.

First Ten review added on May 1, 2019, at 11:05 am by TuyetMai.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

gen_g

I have not come across reviews of this book. It is also professionally edited. I find it fascinating that the author has chosen to view the Gospel of Judas through the Gnostic lens, where he argues that Judas is not the betrayer as so many people sees him as, but instead claims that the part where Judas delivers Jesus to the authorities is actually something tagged on as an afterthought of sorts to cement the Christian claim of Judas being the betrayer. Still this is a heavy book, and I would suggest that the author includes a brief introduction about Gnosticism, as well as a glossary of terms at the beginning to facilitate easy comprehension for the lay-reader. I will not be purchasing this book today, not because it is poorly constructed, but because discourse on religion is not the kind of topic in the books which I go for.

First Ten review added on May 1, 2019, at 11:46 am by gen_g.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

Firefawkes

The content of this book is not something that interests me, and so I will not be continuing to read this book. Having found no errors in the first 10 pages, I would say this book was professionally edited. My favourite part is the obvious passion the author has, seen when he talks about the values of various long-lost texts that may shine a whole new light on the way we view christianity. My least favourite part is, again, the highly religious nature of the book, something I am not interested in personally.

First Ten review added on May 1, 2019, at 12:44 pm by Firefawkes.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

unamilagra

Before sampling this book, I would not have picked it up because I am not religious and have no interest in this type of literature. After sampling the first ten pages, my opinion didn't change. The first ten pages consisted mainly of reviews from other sources, as well as the first two pages of the introduction. Not being religious, I only have the vaguest notion of the story of Judas, and the fact that he sold Jesus out to the Jews to be crucified. I found myself not really understanding what was going on in the first ten pages because I am not familiar with concepts such as Pauline propaganda or Gnosticism. I do not plan to continue reading this book. I did not notice any errors in the pages I read.

First Ten review added on May 1, 2019, at 1:46 pm by unamilagra.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

Nisha Ward

I'm almost not sure about this one. On the one hand, it contains a subject I'm interested in, but on the other the sample doesn't really give you much to go on. Having read the review, however, and looking at the introduction, I'm willing to give this book a chance. It helps that I can take it seriously because it doesn't have any errors, as far as I can see, and the cover makes me wonder about what's inside. Another one goes on my to read list.

First Ten review added on May 1, 2019, at 3:18 pm by Nisha Ward.
Do you plan to read the whole book? Yes!

Juliana_Isabella

I wouldn't have chosen this book because I don't usually look for spiritual information, but the review was definitely intriguing. After reading the first ten pages, I'm impressed with the depth of the author's research, but I'm not necessarily interested to hear more. Although I didn't find any grammatical errors, the author really needed to give more background for people who aren't biblical scholars. Because of this, I won't be buying the book.

First Ten review added on May 1, 2019, at 3:26 pm by Juliana_Isabella.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

Anthony__

The book is well-edited. The title and cover page design are intriguing. Gnosticism says that Judas did not betray Jesus. I am curious about the content. However, I will not want to read the book because of its theological and historical over-loaded information.

First Ten review added on May 1, 2019, at 3:44 pm by Anthony__.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

Bukari

Had it not been the program, I would have read the book because of the cover art that portrays Judas kissing Jesus. The illustration draws me closer to the work, as I am a lover of Christ. The genre of the work too could assist many people in building strong spiritual foundations. I won't buy this book because after reading the first ten pages, the main theme was unclear for me to understand the author's arguments. Exploring the whole narrative would be tedious to follow. I found a few errors in the first ten pages. An example was the omission or inappropriate use of punctuation marks, (" and '".) What I liked most about the book was the relationship between Jesus and Judas. I hope the author's arguments would be factual and not any unproven concepts. The work has an Official OnlineBookClub review, and it influenced my mind not to grab a copy. From the review, I knew the discussions might be misleading to follow.

First Ten review added on May 1, 2019, at 5:12 pm by Bukari.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

KristyKhem

Misreading Judas did not appeal to me based on its cover design, title, and blurb. The lengthy editorial reviews on Amazon and in the sample seemed overdone. The customer reviews were mixed. This seems like a controversial religious read, one that I would not have chosen to buy. The sample consisted of editorial reviews which all praised the book and a brief introduction. I didn’t feel as if I got a good gist of what the book entailed because the sample was so short. Basically, what I inferred was that following National Geographic’s discovery of the Gnostic story of Judas, the author found that the panel of experts chosen to analyze the text did not do a good job. The author then decided to write about it himself. According to him, Christ’s betrayal was fictional and Judas is the real ‘sacrifice’. I don’t necessarily agree with his points, but this is not a subject I am interested in. Therefore, I will not buy and read this book. I did not see any errors while reading so I assume that a full round of editing was done.

First Ten review added on May 1, 2019, at 9:05 pm by KristyKhem.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

Jbcitygirl

I don’t think I would have chosen to sample this book - my initial thought was that it seemed more suited to a church cell group discussion. However after sampling the first ten pages and reading the official OnlineBookClub review and following comments, I have to say that I am intrigued. The conspiracy theory or alternatively put; cover up aspect of this book is thought provoking to say the least. The very thought that the Biblical scholars misinterpreted or even covered up the truth about the role Judas played and the succession relationship for such a long time is a massive story. I like that it is a short book and easy to read. I disliked that the sample on amazon covered very few pages of the actual book, as I would have liked to sample a little more of what the author wrote. The book does appear to be professionally edited; I didn’t notice any errors.

First Ten review added on May 2, 2019, at 12:49 am by Jbcitygirl.
Do you plan to read the whole book? Yes!

Emy Katherine

Without The First Ten program, I would not have chosen to read and sample the book based on the genre. I do not enjoy reading religious non-fiction books; therefore, I did not change my mind after reading both the OBC review and the sample. Neither the cover nor the title appealed to me. Unfortunately, the sample only contains several editorial reviews about the book; consequently, I cannot say if the book was professionally edited. In his work, "Misreading Judas," Robert Wahler examines a collection of Gnostic texts (the Nag Hammadi Library) and the Gospel of Judas, a second-century text discovered in Egypt in the 1970s, to demonstrate that Judas did not betray Jesus. As I mentioned above, it is not a genre I enjoy reading; undoubtedly, this thought-provoking book will appeal to those interested in biblical history.

First Ten review added on May 2, 2019, at 5:34 am by Emy Katherine.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

Delaney35

This is not a book I would normally read. I am not a fan of religious non-fiction, though the official reviewer did have a lot of good things to say about this one. The beginning, though grammatically good, was a little hard to digest. First off, it just jumped into the main idea without a lot of introduction. I did not like that at all. The ideas did seem well-supported though, which was good. It talked about how Judas' character is often misinterpreted by scholars because they ignore bits of texts that are crucial to understand his role in the bible. This is an interesting idea, and one that I had never heard of before. However, I will not be finishing this book because I am not interested enough to work my way through the dense writing.

First Ten review added on May 2, 2019, at 6:28 pm by Delaney35.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

hsimone

If it wasn't for this program, I would not have sampled this read. I personally don't enjoy religious studies and/or much nonfiction texts. Therefore, the cover, title, blurb, and genre would be of no interest to me. The positive OBC ratings and the book's mixed customer ratings do not affect my opinion of the book. It is difficult to know and understand if the book is well-edited. The sample included solely of positive reviews of the book. It's good to hear that there are positive reviews of the book, so it makes sense that the author would like to include this in the beginning pages of the book. However, at the same time, it would have been nice to have included some of the actual book to full appreciate what the author is trying to express in *Misreading Judas*. Regardless of this fact, I still do not plan on buying and reading this book due to not enjoying religious-based books.

First Ten review added on May 2, 2019, at 8:04 pm by hsimone.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

Gravy

This one really doesn't interest me. The genre/subject is not one that I would read, so I would not have sampled it. The sample did not change my mind.
There is a review for this book, but my opinion would be the same without one.
Due to this simply not being of interest to me, I do not plan to continue reading it.

I did not notice any errors, but the amount of exclamation points was off putting for a text of this nature.
I had to reread a few bits for clarity, but most of it was presented in an easy to understand way.
I really can't offer a 'what I liked most' or 'least,' as this just isn't my sort of book.
If forced, I could note that I liked the amount of research the author seems to have put into this, and really didn't like the way the exclamation points made the whole thing seem unreliable and amateurish. This seems like the exact opposite of what the author wants to portray, so I would suggest thinking about editing some of them out.
Again, due to this not being something that interests me, I do not plan to read this.

First Ten review added on May 3, 2019, at 4:09 am by Gravy.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

Bianka Walter

I would not have sampled this book without the first ten program. I do not read religious texts as I am not a religious person. Unfortunately, the sample consists of only reviews about the book, so I wasn't able to glean anything about the writing or about the start of the book. The reviews were all complimentary, but none of them changed my mind. I would have liked to have sampled the first ten pages and to judge for myself. The reviews make it sound like a book packed with a bunch of conspiracy theories about Judas and Jesus, and again, that is not really something that I would like to read about. I can't tell if the book seems well edited because I didn't read any of it. The OBC review, although also complimentary, did not change my mind. I will not be reading this book.

First Ten review added on May 3, 2019, at 4:38 am by Bianka Walter.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

Ekta Kumari

I didn't get to read much of the book in the sample. But I did read some full-length reviews for this book, and those were more than enough to provide me a good understanding of the subjects discussed within this work. I wouldn't have read this book as I disregarded it as a religious book and wasn't interested in reading anything of that sort. But after reading the sample, I'm genuinely intrigued. I don't think this can be regarded as just a religious book as the author is essentially challenging some established beliefs and trying to present an alternative view of Christianity here. He is trying to shed more light on the gnostic traditions and provide his own interpretation of the Gospel of Judas. I find myself intrigued by the author's claims and arguments. I definitely want to know more, so I'm going to read this book. As for the editing, I didn't find any errors in the sample, and I think this book is fairly well edited. I read an official review before starting to read the sample, which, I think, details this book perfectly. I'm going to give this book a try and find out what the author has to say about his interpretation.

First Ten review added on May 3, 2019, at 4:46 am by Ekta Kumari.
Do you plan to read the whole book? Yes!

briellejee

Based on the cover and title, I think I would have sampled the book. I'm into biblical studies about misconceptions, and at first glance, this book is surely the thing I'm looking for. Both aspects caught my curiosity and is appealing enough not only to the target audience. As for the first few pages, I think it's a bummer that they put only reviews and introduction as a sample. Barely did I see the author's writing style, which is not good since I will not be able to know if I like it or not. However, based on the reviews, it's clear that there are misconceptions about Judas Iscariot as a disciple of Christ. Reading the introduction too, I find it interesting to know that this book is based on a certain perspective that some biblical scholars missed. Judas' betrayal was the biggest story back then, and finding evidence about the gnostic origin is as much as appealing as Dan Brown's Da Vinci Code. I'm still not sure whether to buy the book because the sample is too vague to put a decision on, so I think I have to pass up the book for now. I found no noticeable errors and the official OBC review is persuasive enough to tell me to sample this book.

First Ten review added on May 3, 2019, at 4:51 am by briellejee.
Do you plan to read the whole book? No

Total ~ 19%

Misreading Judas earned a score of 19%.

In other words, out of the top-level reviewers who read at least the first 10 pages of this book, 19% plan to read the whole book.

IMPORTANT: Any score over 10% is considered very good. And any score above 0% is acceptable.

Over a million books are published each year. Any given person could not even read .0001% of the books out there. This means readers have to be very selective. Even taking the time to look over reviews and blurbs, let alone read samples, is more time than most readers can afford for most books. The First Ten is a powerful focus group that addresses those issues. It creates a helpful tool for authors, publishers, and other readers.

Go to main Bookshelves page for Misreading Judas