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Shadow of the Cross ~ First Part

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Shadow of the Cross ~ First Part

Post Number:#1  Postby Scott » 11 Feb 2008, 12:22

Use this thread to discuss the first fourth of Shadow of the Cross by Carolyn Garriott. Please do not discuss anything past the first fourth.

If you have not read the first part of the book yet, please join this discussion whenever you have.

Thanks,
Scott
Last edited by Scott on 18 Feb 2008, 12:58, edited 1 time in total.
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Post Number:#2  Postby jerolyng » 12 Feb 2008, 08:38

I usually don’t like being the first to wade in on discussions like this, but I was wondering what the other readers felt about the first three chapters. It is clear that each chapter introduced us to the main characters, but why would the author spend a whole chapter on each character. I do have to admit that I liked Daniel though. Anyone who talks to himself has to be ok.
I like the way the rainbow myth was brought in, but was left wondering why?
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Post Number:#3  Postby avidlistener » 12 Feb 2008, 11:55

Whew-- I am glad someone else went first!
So, in regards to the first three chapters, I am not for sure what the author is going to do, BUT, I think that it will be interesting to see how long she keeps the character's bound to separate chapters. I don't know how many of you have read the Shipping News, but in it the author uses colors and scenery to mimic the emotional well-being of a character. I love the idea of involving the very fabric of the book with the essence of the character. Maybe, as the book goes on we will see less separation between the characters and it will be mimicked in the book's format. I am not sure because I haven't read the whole book, but we do know that Longrobe Ta-ni-hel and Haiki meet in the village and will be interacting. So, I guess in response to that, I am going to be paying more attention to how the characters are separated or joined through formatting.
I also really like the use of the Huron's belief stories. I wonder if any of them are based on the actual beliefs of First Nation's tribes.
Did any one else find her canine perspective interesting? I liked that it didn't get too anthropomorphic--at least they were not talking in a human sense. Thoughts?
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iroquois myths

Post Number:#4  Postby jerolyng » 14 Feb 2008, 08:53

avid listener got me going. I enjoyed the reference to the Sky Woman and Rainbow and thought the description of the colors of love was wonderful. But avid's question about its being based on Huron myths sent me to the library. I can find references to the creation myths of the Iroquois, and it seems that the reference to Sky Woman being pushed from the sky by her husband is part of the creation myth, I can find no reference to Rainbow? Can anyone else help me here?
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Post Number:#5  Postby Scott » 14 Feb 2008, 19:50

Not that much interested me in the first three chapters.

The canine perspective part was interesting. But I do not think it is possible to write from a canine perspective in a realistic way. I would never try to write in the perspective of an animal except in a humorous sense.
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Post Number:#6  Postby avidlistener » 14 Feb 2008, 21:43

I will agree and say that when I was reading the first three chapters, I was not that drawn in. I had to kind of force myself to continue reading. While I still think the writing is immature, after reading a few more chapters I am more interested in the plot-line. I am kind of surprised by the back flap endorsement which implies you'll want to read it all in one sit--not so for me. I am looking forward to discovering why this book has gotten a 5 star average on Amazon.
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Post Number:#7  Postby jerolyng » 14 Feb 2008, 22:13

I have to agree with you about the first three chapters - which is why I asked. I was wondering if I was the only person who kind of drilled my way through them. But by the time I got to the end of Chapter 7 I felt myself being drawn in. I am finding the author has a way of making me feel that I am watching real people. And I am beginning to react to them, much as I do when I meet a new group of people. I am beginning to like some, and feel uneasy about others. We will see. About Scott's comment about the canine perspective. Having been raised on a ranch in Montana and being around dogs all my life, it never even entered my head that there was anything to question. Our dogs were working dogs and they were always there. But I am going to read the parts about the canine perspective more carefully. Jury is still out on that one.
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Post Number:#8  Postby Gaia13 » 18 Feb 2008, 10:11

This is my first post on this forum and the first time I have participated in a discussion of a book since college!
So here it goes... I was very disappointed. I found the writing child-like and the story development unsophisticated. The conflict between the two religions, Native American Indians and French Catholicism is a very interesting one which should have been developed more thoroughly. The characters were not well developed and I do not like anthropomorphisizing and could live without the chapters from the wolves perspective.

Still, the book has its merits and would be a good introduction to cultures and religion albeit at the 7th grade level.
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