November Book of the Month

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Discuss The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

Members of the forum choose and read a new book every month together, and then discuss it. Each book of the month get's it's own whole subforum in this forum. Click here to nominate books for book of the month.

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Post Number:#16  Postby jimmy86 » 24 Jun 2010, 06:58

very nice thread
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Post Number:#17  Postby Jackoliver » 07 Oct 2010, 01:48

I have no red this books but really i want to read this as soon as possible.
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Post Number:#18  Postby Lennoc » 09 Oct 2010, 21:16

Just seconding the recommendation that if you found this book interesting you try 'Born on a Blue day'. It's non-fiction and written by someone who is autistic. A very interesting read.
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Post Number:#19  Postby Sophius » 08 Nov 2010, 19:04

I'm currently reading this book in my contemporray authors class, and though I am not one for realistic fiction I have found this bok to be enjoyable for the reasons stated above. It is interesting to have this book narrated in the manner that an autistic child thinks, and it honestly does shed some light on the disorder of autism. I also enjoyed what is skilfull addition of what is to be percieved as unintentioanl humor, which makes it all the more humoress.
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helped me to understand other people better

Post Number:#20  Postby Jeehey » 15 Nov 2010, 21:09

I read this book last month and really enjoyed it. I actually did not know Christopher was autistic though I knew he had a psycho-social condition. I don't think the book actually specifies it about Christopher being autistic. Anyway, it was nice to learn about a person who is experiencing different thought processes that most of us don't understand. Also, the fact that Christopher reacted so adversely about his dad "lying" to him made me think about how we tend to lie about things to our loved ones because we "care" about them. And, this often doesn't do any good at the end. Lastly, I found it fascinating how Christopher was aware exactly about what he likes and dislikes. I felt intrigued about how these clear distinctions made his life very difficult for him and for other people.

Overall, I would definitely recommend to other people. A great read.
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Post Number:#21  Postby MatDatPhatKat » 29 Mar 2011, 06:27

I read this book some time ago. I've got to say that I didn't enjoy it. I appreciate that it was quite clever, but, as a man with no experience of Aspergers Syndrome, I just found it dull. That's not to suggest that it isn't any good. I just prefer weightier, more epic tomes. I'd suggest that, like the Da Vinci Code, this book is in real danger of being over-hyped. If people expect too much from a book, they'll end up disappointed.
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Curious Incident

Post Number:#22  Postby Evapohler » 04 May 2011, 12:46

Hi All! I'm new to this forum and so glad I found it. I run a book club in San Antonio and would love to sync our picks with yours. We just read Curious Incident and most of us loved it. I agree with what most have said here that the pov is what makes this book interesting, but surprise twists also make it compelling.

I found the narrator believable, as one of my dear friend's sons has aspergers, and I could see his personality in the narrator.

I also enjoyed being taken through several logic and math problems by the narrator, and feel I learned a few new things! I loved the "Behind three doors" example.

I can see why some felt a tragic ending would be suitable, but I liked the near-happy ending. I wanted Christopher to have some peace of mind at last about his A-level maths!
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Post Number:#23  Postby Denysaputra » 07 May 2011, 09:36

It's is exciting, really recommended for all. I think all of nice word should give for the book.
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Post Number:#24  Postby Aileenhu » 31 May 2011, 05:18

How strange...

I got that book out of the library without realising!
:D Enjoy your day~
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Weird...

Post Number:#25  Postby garnicle » 22 Jul 2011, 05:19

I just got the email for the book of the month today(July 22nd 2011, first post seems to be January 2010 .. but i digress) ! I picked up this book without any knowledge of it whatsoever , I didn't even know our protagonist was autistic until I started reading it and I was pleasantly surprised ! I'd recommend it for people who are naturally curious, the fact that it's from a point of view that is entirely alien to us (normal people but even That is subjective) made the read all that more enjoyable. Anyhow, great read, highly recommended.
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Curious incident

Post Number:#26  Postby Geneen Karstens » 09 Aug 2011, 16:30

I just finished this book and realized it was similar to a book I read recently by Jodi Picoult/House Rules. In both books I couldn't help but feel a tremendous admiration for parents who raise these children. I found it trying enough with so- called normal kids. How tough it must be for SpecialNeeds! My heart goes out to both the parents and children. I really enjoyed both books and find them very thought provoking.
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Post Number:#27  Postby Timpane » 15 Aug 2011, 08:45

using a sort of jaded reasoning that often falls short to take the larger image into consideration. And finally, the scribe did a large job in displaying Chris's concerns without producing a mockery of him, humanizing Chris in such a way that I accept as factual most would empathize with him
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The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

Post Number:#28  Postby Florinda » 16 Aug 2011, 02:12

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time is a 2003 novel by British writer Mark Haddon. It won the 2003 Whitbread Book of the Year[1] and the 2004 Commonwealth Writers' Prize for Best First Book.[2] Its title is a quotation of a remark made by the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes in Arthur Conan Doyle's 1892 short story "Silver Blaze".

The story is written in the first-person perspective of Christopher John Francis Boone, a 15-year-old boy who describes himself as ‘a mathematician with some behavioural difficulties’ living in Swindon, Wiltshire. Although Christopher's condition within the autism spectrum is not stated explicitly within the novel, indeed, the words autism or Asperger's are not used by Christopher at all; the summary on the book's inside cover or back cover (depending on the edition) describes it as Asperger syndrome, high-functioning autism, or savant syndrome. In July 2009, Haddon stated on his blog that the book is not specifically about Asperger Syndrome and that he is not an expert on the subject.
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my review of the curious incident of the dog

Post Number:#29  Postby Russellc » 17 Aug 2011, 02:15

This story is just brimming with compassion and realism. It’s also easy to read, emotionally engaging, and I’m pretty sure would appeal to a huge range of people. It would make a great gift for anyone, maybe a teenager who needs encouragement to read.
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Re: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

Post Number:#30  Postby Fran » 17 Aug 2011, 04:02

Florinda wrote:The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time is a 2003 novel by British writer Mark Haddon. It won the 2003 Whitbread Book of the Year[1] and the 2004 Commonwealth Writers' Prize for Best First Book.[2] Its title is a quotation of a remark made by the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes in Arthur Conan Doyle's 1892 short story "Silver Blaze".

The story is written in the first-person perspective of Christopher John Francis Boone, a 15-year-old boy who describes himself as ‘a mathematician with some behavioural difficulties’ living in Swindon, Wiltshire. Although Christopher's condition within the autism spectrum is not stated explicitly within the novel, indeed, the words autism or Asperger's are not used by Christopher at all; the summary on the book's inside cover or back cover (depending on the edition) describes it as Asperger syndrome, high-functioning autism, or savant syndrome. In July 2009, Haddon stated on his blog that the book is not specifically about Asperger Syndrome and that he is not an expert on the subject.


@Florinda

Is this your own opinion or just copy & paste?
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